Ferrari interview on cyclingnews.com

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Robert Chung, May 12, 2003.

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  1. Nick Burns

    Nick Burns Guest

  2. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

  3. "Nick Burns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > His method allows him to compare the performance of his athletes to the competition. If you only
    > use power production, you only have your own athletes values. These guys want to win races, not
    > run light bulbs.

    sustainable wattage/kilogram

    is a more accurate measure of uphill ability.

    A problem with his method is that variables like wind, though small, still affect uphill velocity.
     
  4. Hawke

    Hawke Guest

  5. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

  6. Nick Burns

    Nick Burns Guest

    I dunno about that. The most value comes from measuring it all the time. If you know how much power
    you need to produce for an event, you can ramp up in a predictable and consistent way. In fact, the
    only reason to measure it during competition is to develop training intensities.

    "Hawke" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Robert Chung" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > http://www.cyclingnews.com/riders/2003/interviews/?id=ferrari03
    > >
    > > The guy hasn't heard of watts?
    >
    > Wattage is good only for measuring performance not as a training regime function.
    >
    > Hawke
     
  7. Andy Coggan

    Andy Coggan Guest

    "Robert Chung" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > http://www.cyclingnews.com/riders/2003/interviews/?id=ferrari03
    >
    > The guy hasn't heard of watts?

    Well, obviously V.A.M. = W/kg if the slope is steep enough to negate the effects of wind
    resistance...I therefore assumed that Ferrari has just continued to use the simple
    tests/measurements he started with before powermeters were so widely available. (Clearly it helps to
    have ready access to appropriate climbs as Ferrari seemingly does.)

    Andy Coggan
     
  8. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

    "Andy Coggan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Robert Chung" wrote
    > > http://www.cyclingnews.com/riders/2003/interviews/?id=ferrari03
    > >
    > > The guy hasn't heard of watts?
    >
    > Well, obviously V.A.M. = W/kg if the slope is steep enough to negate the effects of wind
    > resistance...I therefore assumed that Ferrari has just continued to use the simple
    > tests/measurements he started with before powermeters were so widely available. (Clearly it helps
    > to have ready
    access
    > to appropriate climbs as Ferrari seemingly does.)

    Out of curiosity, did you take a glance at the (partial) articles on his website?
     
  9. Andy Coggan

    Andy Coggan Guest

    "Robert Chung" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Andy Coggan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > "Robert Chung" wrote
    > > > http://www.cyclingnews.com/riders/2003/interviews/?id=ferrari03
    > > >
    > > > The guy hasn't heard of watts?
    > >
    > > Well, obviously V.A.M. = W/kg if the slope is steep enough to negate the effects of wind
    > > resistance...I therefore assumed that Ferrari has just continued to use the simple
    > > tests/measurements he started with before powermeters were so widely available. (Clearly it
    > > helps to have ready
    > access
    > > to appropriate climbs as Ferrari seemingly does.)
    >
    > Out of curiosity, did you take a glance at the (partial) articles on his website?

    No, I didn't - although a poster on another forum indicated that after taking an online interview,
    the website suggested that he sign up for their standard training plan for 800 Euro. After reading
    that, I realized that the cyclingnews.com was largely an informercial, i.e., the normally reticent
    Dr. Ferrari decided to grant it because he's got something to sell. Not that I blame him, but it
    significantly reduced my curiousity about what was on the website.

    Andy Coggan
     
  10. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

    "Andy Coggan" <[email protected]> wrote
    > > Out of curiosity, did you take a glance at the (partial) articles on his website?
    >
    > No, I didn't - although a poster on another forum indicated that after taking an online interview,
    > the website suggested that he sign up for
    their
    > standard training plan for 800 Euro. After reading that, I realized that
    the
    > cyclingnews.com was largely an informercial, i.e., the normally reticent
    Dr.
    > Ferrari decided to grant it because he's got something to sell. Not that I blame him, but it
    > significantly reduced my curiousity about what was on
    the
    > website.

    Yeah, after I clicked on the site I came to the same realization. What I found interesting,
    however, was the parts of the articles that he was supplying as come-ons to entice the reader into
    signing up. Yow.
     
  11. Andy Coggan

    Andy Coggan Guest

    "Robert Chung" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Andy Coggan" <[email protected]> wrote
    > > > Out of curiosity, did you take a glance at the (partial) articles on
    his
    > > > website?
    > >
    > > No, I didn't - although a poster on another forum indicated that after taking an online
    > > interview, the website suggested that he sign up for
    > their
    > > standard training plan for 800 Euro. After reading that, I realized that
    > the
    > > cyclingnews.com was largely an informercial, i.e., the normally reticent
    > Dr.
    > > Ferrari decided to grant it because he's got something to sell. Not that
    I
    > > blame him, but it significantly reduced my curiousity about what was on
    > the
    > > website.
    >
    > Yeah, after I clicked on the site I came to the same realization. What I found interesting,
    > however, was the parts of the articles that he was supplying as come-ons to entice the reader into
    > signing up. Yow.

    Yow? Because of the content, or simply because of the approach? Doesn't seem too likely that you're
    referring to the former, since most of them only have an introductory paragraph or two...although
    there's enough of the "High Pedaling Cadence" article there to show that Dr. Ferrari doesn't know
    much about the factors regulating/influencing muscle blood flow. OTOH, the article "Hematocrit in
    Athletes - State of the Art" was a pretty good summary of the factors affecting hematocrit, although
    it doesn't focus all that much on athletes (and it doesn't reference any of the excellent research
    done on the topic by David Martin of the AIS).

    Maybe I should launch my own website, and charge people to read review articles I write? ;-)

    Andy Coggan
     
  12. Warren

    Warren Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Andy Coggan
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Maybe I should launch my own website, and charge people to read review articles I write? ;-)

    You'll put CC out of business in no time.

    -WG
     
  13. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

    "Andy Coggan" <[email protected]> wrote
    > >
    > > Yeah, after I clicked on the site I came to the same realization. What I found interesting,
    > > however, was the parts of the articles that he was supplying as come-ons to entice the reader
    > > into signing up. Yow.
    >
    > Yow? Because of the content, or simply because of the approach? Doesn't
    seem
    > too likely that you're referring to the former, since most of them only
    have
    > an introductory paragraph or two...although there's enough of the "High Pedaling Cadence"
    > article there to show that Dr. Ferrari doesn't know much about the factors
    > regulating/influencing muscle blood flow. OTOH, the article "Hematocrit in Athletes - State of
    > the Art" was a pretty good summary of the factors affecting hematocrit, although it doesn't
    > focus all that much on athletes (and it doesn't reference any of the excellent research done on
    > the topic by David Martin of the AIS).

    I didn't get as far as the hematocrit article. My head was still vibrating after reading the
    pedaling cadence and VAM things.
     
  14. Andy Coggan

    Andy Coggan Guest

    "Robert Chung" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Andy Coggan" <[email protected]> wrote
    > > >
    > > > Yeah, after I clicked on the site I came to the same realization. What
    I
    > > > found interesting, however, was the parts of the articles that he was supplying as come-ons to
    > > > entice the reader into signing up. Yow.
    > >
    > > Yow? Because of the content, or simply because of the approach? Doesn't
    > seem
    > > too likely that you're referring to the former, since most of them only
    > have
    > > an introductory paragraph or two...although there's enough of the "High Pedaling Cadence"
    > > article there to show that Dr. Ferrari doesn't know
    much
    > > about the factors regulating/influencing muscle blood flow. OTOH, the article "Hematocrit in
    > > Athletes - State of the Art" was a pretty good summary of the factors affecting hematocrit,
    > > although it doesn't focus
    all
    > > that much on athletes (and it doesn't reference any of the excellent research done on the topic
    > > by David Martin of the AIS).
    >
    > I didn't get as far as the hematocrit article. My head was still vibrating after reading the
    > pedaling cadence and VAM things.

    I got the impression during my quick perusal that you had to pay to be able to read the entire
    article - is that not true?

    Andy Coggan
     
  15. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

    "Andy Coggan" <[email protected]> wrote
    > I got the impression during my quick perusal that you had to pay to be
    able
    > to read the entire article - is that not true?

    My understanding, too. Which is sort of odd, when you think about it. You might think that if that
    were the case you'd want to put your very best foot forward, or your most tantalizing bit of info up
    front. That stuff about VAM and cadence turned me off.

    I don't think you'd be successful selling your stuff on a website. You don't appear to be enough of
    a huckster.
     
  16. Hawke

    Hawke Guest

    "Andy Coggan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Robert Chung" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "Andy Coggan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > "Robert Chung" wrote
    > > > > http://www.cyclingnews.com/riders/2003/interviews/?id=ferrari03
    > > > >
    > > > > The guy hasn't heard of watts?
    > > >
    > > > Well, obviously V.A.M. = W/kg if the slope is steep enough to negate
    the
    > > > effects of wind resistance...I therefore assumed that Ferrari has just continued to use the
    > > > simple tests/measurements he started with before powermeters were so widely available.
    > > > (Clearly it helps to have ready
    > > access
    > > > to appropriate climbs as Ferrari seemingly does.)
    > >
    > > Out of curiosity, did you take a glance at the (partial) articles on his website?
    >
    > No, I didn't - although a poster on another forum indicated that after taking an online interview,
    > the website suggested that he sign up for
    their
    > standard training plan for 800 Euro. After reading that, I realized that
    the
    > cyclingnews.com was largely an informercial, i.e., the normally reticent
    Dr.
    > Ferrari decided to grant it because he's got something to sell. Not that I blame him, but it
    > significantly reduced my curiousity about what was on
    the
    > website.
    >
    > Andy Coggan

    but, but, but Andy, aren't you promoting the PowerTap?

    Hawke
     
  17. Hawke

    Hawke Guest

    "Andy Coggan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:D[email protected]...
    > "Robert Chung" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "Andy Coggan" <[email protected]> wrote
    > > > > Out of curiosity, did you take a glance at the (partial) articles on
    > his
    > > > > website?
    > > >
    > > > No, I didn't - although a poster on another forum indicated that after taking an online
    > > > interview, the website suggested that he sign up for
    > > their
    > > > standard training plan for 800 Euro. After reading that, I realized
    that
    > > the
    > > > cyclingnews.com was largely an informercial, i.e., the normally
    reticent
    > > Dr.
    > > > Ferrari decided to grant it because he's got something to sell. Not
    that
    > I
    > > > blame him, but it significantly reduced my curiousity about what was
    on
    > > the
    > > > website.
    > >
    > > Yeah, after I clicked on the site I came to the same realization. What I found interesting,
    > > however, was the parts of the articles that he was supplying as come-ons to entice the reader
    > > into signing up. Yow.
    >
    > Yow? Because of the content, or simply because of the approach? Doesn't
    seem
    > too likely that you're referring to the former, since most of them only
    have
    > an introductory paragraph or two...although there's enough of the "High Pedaling Cadence"
    > article there to show that Dr. Ferrari doesn't know much about the factors
    > regulating/influencing muscle blood flow. OTOH, the article "Hematocrit in Athletes - State of
    > the Art" was a pretty good summary of the factors affecting hematocrit, although it doesn't
    > focus all that much on athletes (and it doesn't reference any of the excellent research done on
    > the topic by David Martin of the AIS).
    >
    > Maybe I should launch my own website, and charge people to read review articles I write? ;-)
    >
    > Andy Coggan

    Good idea, but don't give up your day job!

    Hawke
     
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