Festina Brewing??

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by B. Lafferty, Feb 11, 2004.

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  1. B. Lafferty

    B. Lafferty Guest

    Perhaps rider health profiles should be extended to all rider, not just the French based teams. Or
    just let them dope with peoper provisions. It's all probably just malcontents and no-hopers.

    http://www.procycling.com/news_main.asp?newsId=4917 French Federation’s doctor warns of EPO use

    French paper Le Monde has printed extracts of a letter written by Armand Mégret, the doctor of the
    French Cycling Federation (FFC), and sent to FFC president Jean Pitallier and Professional Cycling
    League president (LCP) Thierry Cazeneuve in which Mégret warns of an apparent increase in EPO use
    among professional and amateur riders in France. [snip]

    Mégret bases his concerns on medical tests undertaken at three different points of last season on a
    group of 700 French or foreign riders based in French teams. In particular, Mégret highlights the
    increase during the season in the number of riders whose tests showed the presence of reticulocytes
    (immature red blood cells). Among the pros, Mégret writes, "the numbers pass from 1.8% when the
    first test was done in 2003 to 29.2% when the third was done." That third test was done on June 28,
    just before the French road championships and a week before the start of the Tour de France.

    "It is clear that there was some external stimulation of the production of red blood cells among
    29.2% of the 154 riders tested," Mégret says, adding: "The hypothesis that stimulation has been via
    EPO must be considered." Mégret also states that the abnormal level of ferritin, a protein that
    stores iron in the body, in 30% of riders tested indicates use of EPO. Chillingly, he explains that
    an excess of iron can lead to liver problems, including cancer.

    Mégret also indicates in his letter that 6-7% of riders tested show signs of damage to the adrenal
    gland and in 90% of cases this is due to "taking corticoids in either a licit or an illicit
    fashion." This type of damage, says Mégret even more chillingly, could lead to death at any time.
    ............
     
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  2. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    In a slightly horrible way this should demonstrate to you that drug use is NOT universal in the pro
    peloton Brian.

    "B. Lafferty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Perhaps rider health profiles should be extended to all rider, not just
    the
    > French based teams. Or just let them dope with peoper provisions. It's
    all
    > probably just malcontents and no-hopers.
    >
    >
    > http://www.procycling.com/news_main.asp?newsId=4917 French Federation's doctor warns of EPO use
    >
    > French paper Le Monde has printed extracts of a letter written by Armand Mégret, the doctor of
    > the French Cycling Federation (FFC), and sent to FFC president Jean Pitallier and Professional
    > Cycling League president (LCP) Thierry Cazeneuve in which Mégret warns of an apparent increase in
    > EPO use among professional and amateur riders in France. [snip]
    >
    > Mégret bases his concerns on medical tests undertaken at three different points of last season on
    > a group of 700 French or foreign riders based in French teams. In particular, Mégret highlights
    > the increase during the season in the number of riders whose tests showed the presence of
    > reticulocytes (immature red blood cells). Among the pros, Mégret writes, "the numbers pass from
    > 1.8% when the first test was done in 2003 to 29.2% when the third was done." That third test was
    > done on June 28, just before the French road championships and a week before the start of the Tour
    > de France.
    >
    > "It is clear that there was some external stimulation of the production of red blood cells among
    > 29.2% of the 154 riders tested," Mégret says,
    adding:
    > "The hypothesis that stimulation has been via EPO must be considered." Mégret also states that the
    > abnormal level of ferritin, a protein that stores iron in the body, in 30% of riders tested
    > indicates use of EPO. Chillingly, he explains that an excess of iron can lead to liver problems,
    > including cancer.
    >
    > Mégret also indicates in his letter that 6-7% of riders tested show signs
    of
    > damage to the adrenal gland and in 90% of cases this is due to "taking corticoids in either a
    > licit or an illicit fashion." This type of damage, says Mégret even more chillingly, could lead to
    > death at any time. ............
     
  3. B. Lafferty

    B. Lafferty Guest

    Dearest Tom,

    I've never said that drug use was "universal" in the peloton. That's your polemic nature coming
    to the fore. But, 30% probable for just one drug, EPO is hardly insignificant. I 'd be
    interested to know the extent of cross-over between the EPO and corticoid indicators. And which
    drugs being used, such as HgH, might not be picked up by the health profiling?

    "Tom Kunich" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In a slightly horrible way this should demonstrate to you that drug use is NOT universal in the
    > pro peloton Brian.
    >
    > "B. Lafferty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Perhaps rider health profiles should be extended to all rider, not just
    > the
    > > French based teams. Or just let them dope with peoper provisions. It's
    > all
    > > probably just malcontents and no-hopers.
    > >
    > >
    > > http://www.procycling.com/news_main.asp?newsId=4917 French Federation's doctor warns of EPO use
    > >
    > > French paper Le Monde has printed extracts of a letter written by
    Armand
    > > Mégret, the doctor of the French Cycling Federation (FFC), and sent to
    FFC
    > > president Jean Pitallier and Professional Cycling League president (LCP) Thierry Cazeneuve in
    > > which Mégret warns of an apparent increase in EPO
    use
    > > among professional and amateur riders in France. [snip]
    > >
    > > Mégret bases his concerns on medical tests undertaken at three different points of last season
    > > on a group of 700 French or foreign riders based
    in
    > > French teams. In particular, Mégret highlights the increase during the season in the number of
    > > riders whose tests showed the presence of reticulocytes (immature red blood cells). Among the
    > > pros, Mégret writes, "the numbers pass from 1.8% when the first test was done in 2003 to
    29.2%
    > > when the third was done." That third test was done on June 28, just
    before
    > > the French road championships and a week before the start of the Tour de France.
    > >
    > > "It is clear that there was some external stimulation of the production
    of
    > > red blood cells among 29.2% of the 154 riders tested," Mégret says,
    > adding:
    > > "The hypothesis that stimulation has been via EPO must be considered." Mégret also states that
    > > the abnormal level of ferritin, a protein that stores iron in the body, in 30% of riders tested
    > > indicates use of EPO. Chillingly, he explains that an excess of iron can lead to liver
    problems,
    > > including cancer.
    > >
    > > Mégret also indicates in his letter that 6-7% of riders tested show
    signs
    > of
    > > damage to the adrenal gland and in 90% of cases this is due to "taking corticoids in either a
    > > licit or an illicit fashion." This type of
    damage,
    > > says Mégret even more chillingly, could lead to death at any time. ............
    > >
    >
     
  4. Dan Connelly

    Dan Connelly Guest

    B. Lafferty wrote:
    > Dearest Tom,
    >
    > I've never said that drug use was "universal" in the peloton. That's your polemic nature
    > coming to the fore. But, 30% probable for just one drug, EPO is hardly insignificant. I 'd be
    > interested to know the extent of cross-over between the EPO and corticoid indicators. And
    > which drugs being used, such as HgH, might not be picked up by the health profiling?
    >

    Clearly it's a big number. But it's at the low end of what one'd believe by the rumors. If you
    profiled athletes in US Football leagues for androgen use, I suggest the number would be much
    higher. For US sports, though, drugs really aren't a big issue, even if G. "43" W. B. is on the
    problem even as we speak.

    Dan
     
  5. Jay Hill

    Jay Hill Guest

    Dan Connelly wrote:

    > if G. "43" W. B. is on the problem even as we speak.

    What's 43?
     
  6. Dan Connelly

    Dan Connelly Guest

    Jay Hill wrote:
    > Dan Connelly wrote:
    >
    >> if G. "43" W. B. is on the problem even as we speak.
    >
    >
    > What's 43?
    >

    As opposed to G. "1" W., etc.
     
  7. Howard Kveck

    Howard Kveck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Jay Hill <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Dan Connelly wrote:
    >
    > > if G. "43" W. B. is on the problem even as we speak.
    >
    > What's 43?

    Richard Petty's number, but that's a different subject. GW Bush = 43 (43rd president) vs. GHW
    Bush (aka Bush 41).

    http://www.mnftiu.cc/mnftiu.cc/war31.html

    --
    tanx, Howard

    "We're not laughing -at- you, we're laughing -with- you..) "But... I'm not
    laughing???" Happiness

    remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
     
  8. On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 04:34:31 GMT, Howard Kveck wrote:
    > Jay Hill <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> What's 43?
    >
    > Richard Petty's number

    It is however not a "curious or interesting" number.
     
  9. Amit

    Amit Guest

    Ewoud Dronkert <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 04:34:31 GMT, Howard Kveck wrote:
    > > Jay Hill <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> What's 43?
    > >
    > > Richard Petty's number
    >
    > It is however not a "curious or interesting" number.

    Dumbass, I disagree.

    It's a prime number.
     
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