Finally, a non-carbon Campy compact crank!



A

App

Guest
When will it be available? I see it is a Centaur model. Will there be
Chorus/Record?

TIA

App
 
A

Andrew Karre

Guest
But why must it have a proprietary BCD? Why can't it be 110? I would
buy this crank if it were 110, but I won't now because I don't want to
be limited to Campy rings (sorry, not going to pay a premium for "18%
better shifting" or any other nonsense) and I want to have
compatibility with my other 110 cranksets. I understand why they did
it, but I don't like it.

Andrew Karre
 
B

bfd

Guest
Actually, this has been discussed on ibob list and someone corresponded
with Campy and was told that the bcd WILL BE 110bcd!!!! Of course,
things may change, so we'll have to wait until it comes out to confirm.

Further, being that this is a Centaur-level crank, you'll get Campy
quality without paying Record prices!!!!

For those who "look down" at Centaur, remember that the majority of the
innards in the Centaur ergo levers and rear hub are basically the same
as Record. Centaur is arguably the best value from Campy!
 
K

Kinky Cowboy

Guest
On 3 Aug 2005 08:13:59 -0700, "Andrew Karre" <[email protected]>
wrote:

>But why must it have a proprietary BCD? Why can't it be 110? I would
>buy this crank if it were 110, but I won't now because I don't want to
>be limited to Campy rings (sorry, not going to pay a premium for "18%
>better shifting" or any other nonsense) and I want to have
>compatibility with my other 110 cranksets. I understand why they did
>it, but I don't like it.
>
>Andrew Karre


Is it patentable? If not, expect to see TA rings in the Campag compact
pattern before your first set wears out.


Kinky Cowboy*

*Batteries not included
May contain traces of nuts
Your milage may vary
 
T

Tom Reingold

Guest
What is a compact crank?

--
Tom Reingold
Noo Joizy
This email address works, but only for a short time.
 
B

bfd

Guest
People refer to double cranks with 110mm bolt circle diameter (bcd) as
"compact" cranks and allow a 33t small chainring. In contrast, the
smallest chainring you can use with Campy's 135 bcd is 39t; Shimano
130bcd allows only as low as a 38t.

Tyler Hamilton made this type of crank popular a few years ago when he
rode up the Alps with either a 52x36 or 50x36 FSA carbon crank. After
that, people who were afraid to use a triple, otherwise they would be
called a FRED or POSEUR, wanted one and the compact crank craze began.
Most mfrs, except Shimano, now offer one and its common to find.
 
T

Tom Reingold

Guest
bfd wrote:
> People refer to double cranks with 110mm bolt circle diameter (bcd) as
> "compact" cranks and allow a 33t small chainring. In contrast, the
> smallest chainring you can use with Campy's 135 bcd is 39t; Shimano
> 130bcd allows only as low as a 38t.
>
> Tyler Hamilton made this type of crank popular a few years ago when he
> rode up the Alps with either a 52x36 or 50x36 FSA carbon crank. After
> that, people who were afraid to use a triple, otherwise they would be
> called a FRED or POSEUR, wanted one and the compact crank craze began.
> Most mfrs, except Shimano, now offer one and its common to find.
>


Thanks!

I like to buy as little equipment as possible. I have an old Campy
crank, and the smallest chainring available is 42T. When I started
towing my kids in a trailer, I needed lower gears, so I put on a
freewheel that has a 34T sprocket for a low gear. I still ride this
setup. It's ugly, and the gears are widely spaced, but it works, and I
guess I'm a reverse snob.

A triple crank would be nice, coupled with close gears in the rear, but
I'm too cheap for that.

--
Tom Reingold
Noo Joizy
This email address works, but only for a short time.
 
S

Sheldon Brown

Guest
Tom Reingold asked:

> What is a compact crank?


See: http://sheldonbrown.com/gloss_cn-z.html#compactcrank

This is one of many cycling terms defined and explained in my Bicycle
Glossary.

http://sheldonbrown.com/glossary

Sheldon "Cyclexicographer" Brown
+-------------------------------------------------+
| I contend that we are both atheists. |
| I just believe in one fewer god than you do. |
| When you understand why you dismiss all the |
| other possible gods, you will understand |
| why I dismiss yours. --Stephen Roberts |
+-------------------------------------------------+
Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts
Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041
http://harriscyclery.com
Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
 
M

Michael Press

Guest
In article
<[email protected]>,
"bfd" <[email protected]> wrote:

> People refer to double cranks with 110mm bolt circle diameter (bcd) as
> "compact" cranks and allow a 33t small chainring. In contrast, the
> smallest chainring you can use with Campy's 135 bcd is 39t; Shimano
> 130bcd allows only as low as a 38t.
>
> Tyler Hamilton made this type of crank popular a few years ago when he
> rode up the Alps with either a 52x36 or 50x36 FSA carbon crank. After
> that, people who were afraid to use a triple, otherwise they would be
> called a FRED or POSEUR, wanted one and the compact crank craze began.
> Most mfrs, except Shimano, now offer one and its common to find.


Hi. A couple questions.
What is the origin of the expression "Fred?" Could it be the
creation Fat Freddy of Gilbert Shelton the cartoonist?

If a guy is running a triple when manly men only run a double, how
can the triple rider be called a poseur, since that triple is out
there to be seen? The essence of poseur is appearance. Thanks.

I absolutely understand the point that someone would run a doubble
for fear of being seen with a trippple. :)

--
Michael Press
 
B

bfd

Guest
Michael asks:

<What is the origin of the expression "Fred?" >

A few "definitions' from wreck.bike.racing:

A ~Fred~ is anyone you happen not to agree with or perhaps who does not

understand some of the finer points of cycling.

It is a derogatory term the use of which is intended to imply that the
user is a real hot-****.

OR

Someone who doesn't use google to research questions in the
rbr archive (which does bear some resemblance to Borges's Library
of Babel). Especially FAQs like this one, which has been
answered often, e.g.

http://groups.google.com/[email protected]

OR

If you do not wear underwear underneath your shorts you're a Fred.

If you do not have a mirror attached to your helmet you're a Fred.


If you wear a pro jersey then you're a pro. If you wear nothing but
Performance shorts, non-bibs, you ARE a Fred (in a major way).


If you use chamois gel for a 10 mile ride and have hairy legs then
of course you're a dork... err... Fred.


If you calculate your average speed to the 100th's of kph or mph then
you ARE a Fred. Pros train by hours. Freds aim for "19.34 mph on
today's 30 mile training ride."


< a guy is running a triple when manly men only run a double, how
can the triple rider be called a poseur, since that triple is out
there to be seen? The essence of poseur is appearance.>

Again, from rec.bike.racing:

poseur is not measured by the distance he can ride. A poseur is
measured by the ratio of ego to ability.

OR
 
A

App

Guest
(Mis?)quoth BFD:
>
> If you do not wear underwear underneath your shorts you're a Fred.
>
> If you do not have a mirror attached to your helmet you're a Fred.


?!

App
 
M

Michael Press

Guest
In article
<[email protected]>,
"bfd" <[email protected]> wrote:

> Michael asks:
>
> <What is the origin of the expression "Fred?" >
>
> A few "definitions' from wreck.bike.racing:
>
> A ~Fred~ is anyone you happen not to agree with or perhaps who does not
>
> understand some of the finer points of cycling.
>
> It is a derogatory term the use of which is intended to imply that the
> user is a real hot-****.
>
> OR
>
> Someone who doesn't use google to research questions in the
> rbr archive (which does bear some resemblance to Borges's Library
> of Babel). Especially FAQs like this one, which has been
> answered often, e.g.


Thanks, and all that.
I asked about the origin. I considered asking for the
etymology but predicted that you would tell me I'm off
topic and send me to sci.bio. Even my modest request
appears to have fried the remaining neurons you had to rub
together.

>
> http://groups.google.com/[email protected]


Yep, read it long since.

>
> OR
>
> If you do not wear underwear underneath your shorts you're a Fred.
>
> If you do not have a mirror attached to your helmet you're a Fred.
>
>
> If you wear a pro jersey then you're a pro. If you wear nothing but
> Performance shorts, non-bibs, you ARE a Fred (in a major way).
>
>
> If you use chamois gel for a 10 mile ride and have hairy legs then
> of course you're a dork... err... Fred.
>
>
> If you calculate your average speed to the 100th's of kph or mph then
> you ARE a Fred. Pros train by hours. Freds aim for "19.34 mph on
> today's 30 mile training ride."


Got me. 19.4 to 20.1 km/hr on a 50 km ride.

>
>
> < a guy is running a triple when manly men only run a double, how
> can the triple rider be called a poseur, since that triple is out
> there to be seen? The essence of poseur is appearance.>
>
> Again, from rec.bike.racing:
>
> poseur is not measured by the distance he can ride. A poseur is
> measured by the ratio of ego to ability.
>
> OR


Understood.

--
Michael Press
 
Q

Qui si parla Campagnolo

Guest
App wrote:
> When will it be available? I see it is a Centaur model. Will there be
> Chorus/Record?
>
> TIA
>
> App


Probably about December and Centaur, Veloce, Mirage. I'm sure the same
arms, different labels and then different rings. No aluminum for
Record/Chrosu. I wish these were around earlier, We could have sold a
boat load of them instead of the kinda crappy FSA one.
 
A

App

Guest
Peter C. wrote:

"...We could have sold a boat load of them instead of the kinda crappy
FSA one. "

Is it the bb or the crank that cranks you off?

I have an energy compact with the 2-bearing isis bb - carried me
through the Death Ride (or 11,000 vertical feet thereof) just fine at
with me at about 205 lbs. Probably got about 1,000 miles on the bb.

Just an N of one but I was wondering where your beef lies (does that
sound bad?!).

App
 
Q

Qui si parla Campagnolo

Guest
App wrote:
> Peter C. wrote:
>
> "...We could have sold a boat load of them instead of the kinda crappy
> FSA one. "
>
> Is it the bb or the crank that cranks you off?


Really inexpensive bearimngs, plastic seals and such, pretty soft
chainrings.
Long term reliability is my concern, plus the lack of Italian BBs.
>
> I have an energy compact with the 2-bearing isis bb - carried me
> through the Death Ride (or 11,000 vertical feet thereof) just fine at
> with me at about 205 lbs. Probably got about 1,000 miles on the bb.
>
> Just an N of one but I was wondering where your beef lies (does that
> sound bad?!).
>
> App
 
P

Phil Cox

Guest
Who is selling these? Where can I take a look at them? I could not find the
spec on the Campy site.

Phil
 
L

Llatikcuf

Guest
I folded a chainring and bent the spider of a FSA energy compact
crankset in a fast take off. Crank was only about 6 months old. FSA
warranty service was fast and good though.

-n

--


Llatikcuf-at-gmail-dot-com


Let the bridges I burn light my way...