Finally done!

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by sarah bennett, Dec 19, 2005.

  1. On Mon 19 Dec 2005 09:12:04p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Ken Davey?

    > Goomba38 wrote:
    >> Michael "Dog3" Lonergan wrote:
    >>
    >>> ROFL... Absinthe make the brain go yonder.
    >>>
    >>> Michael
    >>>

    >> oh god.. you're killing me here!! LOL
    >> <making note of all the Absinthe jokes>
    >>
    >> Goomba

    >
    > Actually the old saw went "Absinthe makes the heart grow fodder".
    > All in all it is an interesting drink and an acquired taste.
    > It does not deserve it's bad reputation.
    > http://www.absinthebuyersguide.com/history.html
    >
    > Ken.


    I've never tasted absinthe, but have read that Pernod is a decent
    substitute without absinthe's toxic characteristics. I'd say that for many
    people, Pernod is also an acquired taste. I happen to love it.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    _____________________________________________

    A chicken in every pot is a *LOT* of chicken!
     


  2. Wayne wrote:

    > Somewhere along the road of life I read that because of absinthe being
    > aged in wormwood, there was a toxin that leached into the liquid that
    > caused insanity if consumed with regularity. Old wive's tale? I don't
    > know.


    You're probably talking about thujone. The controversy rages on as to
    whether there's enough thujone in absinthe to do real damage to a human
    neurosystem. (Google for thujone to find such arguments.)

    Most of my Gothic friends went through a phase where they were interested in
    absinthe. In a discussion over its long-term effects, the comment I made
    was, "You can debate the issue as much as you like, but the specter of
    millions of crazed Frenchmen is hard to ignore."

    I was given two bottles of absinthe some years ago, and I eventually got
    around to tasting it. It's an extremely bitter admixture of licorice and
    pine flavors. I didn't like it, and I donated both bottles to a party
    earlier this year.

    Bob
     
  3. Wayne wrote:

    > I've never tasted absinthe, but have read that Pernod is a decent
    > substitute without absinthe's toxic characteristics. I'd say that
    > for many people, Pernod is also an acquired taste. I happen to love it.


    Pernod only has a passing resemblance to absinthe; it lacks the extreme
    bitterness (that comes from the wormwood) and the pine flavors.

    Speaking of wormwood, it can't be all THAT toxic or vermouth would be as
    verboten as absinthe. (The very name "vermouth" comes from the German word
    "wermut," meaning "wormwood.")

    Bob
     
  4. Ken Davey

    Ken Davey Guest

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Mon 19 Dec 2005 09:12:04p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Ken
    > Davey?
    >
    >> Goomba38 wrote:
    >>> Michael "Dog3" Lonergan wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> ROFL... Absinthe make the brain go yonder.
    >>>>
    >>>> Michael
    >>>>
    >>> oh god.. you're killing me here!! LOL
    >>> <making note of all the Absinthe jokes>
    >>>
    >>> Goomba

    >>
    >> Actually the old saw went "Absinthe makes the heart grow fodder".
    >> All in all it is an interesting drink and an acquired taste.
    >> It does not deserve it's bad reputation.
    >> http://www.absinthebuyersguide.com/history.html
    >>
    >> Ken.

    >
    > I've never tasted absinthe, but have read that Pernod is a decent
    > substitute without absinthe's toxic characteristics. I'd say that
    > for many people, Pernod is also an acquired taste. I happen to love
    > it.
    >


    The toxin in Absinthe is alpha-thujone, generally present in modern day
    Absinthe in concentrationsof 10PPM.
    http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20000401/fob4.asp

    "In today's absinthe, the most toxic compound is the alcohol"
    It (the booze, not the toxin) can be purchased in Canada. Alas - not cheap.

    Ken.



    --
    http://www.rupert.net/~solar
    Return address supplied by 'spammotel'
    http://www.spammotel.com
     
  5. On Mon 19 Dec 2005 09:33:11p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Bob
    Terwilliger?

    > Wayne wrote:
    >
    >> Somewhere along the road of life I read that because of absinthe being
    >> aged in wormwood, there was a toxin that leached into the liquid that
    >> caused insanity if consumed with regularity. Old wive's tale? I don't
    >> know.

    >
    > You're probably talking about thujone. The controversy rages on as to
    > whether there's enough thujone in absinthe to do real damage to a human
    > neurosystem. (Google for thujone to find such arguments.)
    >
    > Most of my Gothic friends went through a phase where they were
    > interested in absinthe. In a discussion over its long-term effects, the
    > comment I made was, "You can debate the issue as much as you like, but
    > the specter of millions of crazed Frenchmen is hard to ignore."
    >
    > I was given two bottles of absinthe some years ago, and I eventually got
    > around to tasting it. It's an extremely bitter admixture of licorice and
    > pine flavors. I didn't like it, and I donated both bottles to a party
    > earlier this year.


    Thanks for the interesting info!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    _____________________________________________

    A chicken in every pot is a *LOT* of chicken!
     
  6. On Mon 19 Dec 2005 09:36:09p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Bob
    Terwilliger?

    > Wayne wrote:
    >
    >> I've never tasted absinthe, but have read that Pernod is a decent
    >> substitute without absinthe's toxic characteristics. I'd say that for
    >> many people, Pernod is also an acquired taste. I happen to love it.

    >
    > Pernod only has a passing resemblance to absinthe; it lacks the extreme
    > bitterness (that comes from the wormwood) and the pine flavors.
    >
    > Speaking of wormwood, it can't be all THAT toxic or vermouth would be as
    > verboten as absinthe. (The very name "vermouth" comes from the German
    > word "wermut," meaning "wormwood.")


    And also for this!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    _____________________________________________

    A chicken in every pot is a *LOT* of chicken!
     
  7. On Mon 19 Dec 2005 09:39:11p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Ken Davey?

    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >> On Mon 19 Dec 2005 09:12:04p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Ken
    >> Davey?
    >>
    >>> Goomba38 wrote:
    >>>> Michael "Dog3" Lonergan wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> ROFL... Absinthe make the brain go yonder.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Michael
    >>>>>
    >>>> oh god.. you're killing me here!! LOL
    >>>> <making note of all the Absinthe jokes>
    >>>>
    >>>> Goomba
    >>>
    >>> Actually the old saw went "Absinthe makes the heart grow fodder".
    >>> All in all it is an interesting drink and an acquired taste.
    >>> It does not deserve it's bad reputation.
    >>> http://www.absinthebuyersguide.com/history.html
    >>>
    >>> Ken.

    >>
    >> I've never tasted absinthe, but have read that Pernod is a decent
    >> substitute without absinthe's toxic characteristics. I'd say that
    >> for many people, Pernod is also an acquired taste. I happen to love
    >> it.
    >>

    >
    > The toxin in Absinthe is alpha-thujone, generally present in modern day
    > Absinthe in concentrationsof 10PPM.
    > http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20000401/fob4.asp
    >
    > "In today's absinthe, the most toxic compound is the alcohol"
    > It (the booze, not the toxin) can be purchased in Canada. Alas - not
    > cheap.
    >
    > Ken.


    Thanks, Ken! I really would like to taste it sometime.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    _____________________________________________

    A chicken in every pot is a *LOT* of chicken!
     
  8. Vilco

    Vilco Guest

    Mi e' parso che Bob Terwilliger abbia scritto:

    > Pernod only has a passing resemblance to absinthe; it
    > lacks the extreme bitterness (that comes from the
    > wormwood) and the pine flavors.


    It also lacks the 80% alcool content. Or at least, here in Italy
    when you find absynthe it is around 80% alcool.
    And I too dislike that extreme bitterness, along with the
    tannicity, also this originating from the wood.
    --
    Vilco
    Think Pink , Drink Rose'
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Ken Davey" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> Actually the old saw went "Absinthe makes the heart grow fodder".


    I always thought it was "Absinthe makes the heart grow fonder." Was
    fodder a typo?
    --
    http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-18-05 - Church review (I think
    I'll become a critic - Rob's been calling me one for years!)
    and a toffee recipe.
     
  10. "Bob Terwilliger" <vir[email protected]_spammer.biz> looking for trouble
    wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > Wayne wrote:
    >
    >> Somewhere along the road of life I read that because of absinthe
    >> being aged in wormwood, there was a toxin that leached into the
    >> liquid that caused insanity if consumed with regularity. Old wive's
    >> tale? I don't know.

    >
    > You're probably talking about thujone. The controversy rages on as to
    > whether there's enough thujone in absinthe to do real damage to a
    > human neurosystem. (Google for thujone to find such arguments.)
    >
    > Most of my Gothic friends went through a phase where they were
    > interested in absinthe. In a discussion over its long-term effects,
    > the comment I made was, "You can debate the issue as much as you like,
    > but the specter of millions of crazed Frenchmen is hard to ignore."
    >
    > I was given two bottles of absinthe some years ago, and I eventually
    > got around to tasting it. It's an extremely bitter admixture of
    > licorice and pine flavors. I didn't like it, and I donated both
    > bottles to a party earlier this year.
    >
    > Bob


    My friend Martha smuggled some in from Greece last year. The stuff is
    nasty.

    Michael

    --
    ....Bacteria: The rear entrance to a cafeteria.

    All gramatical errors and misspellings due to Ramsey the cyber kitten. He
    now owns all keyboards and computing devices in the household and has the
    final say on what is, or is not, posted.
    Send email to dog30 at charter dot net
     
  11. Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> looking for trouble wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Mon 19 Dec 2005 09:12:04p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Ken
    > Davey?
    >
    >> Goomba38 wrote:
    >>> Michael "Dog3" Lonergan wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> ROFL... Absinthe make the brain go yonder.
    >>>>
    >>>> Michael
    >>>>
    >>> oh god.. you're killing me here!! LOL
    >>> <making note of all the Absinthe jokes>
    >>>
    >>> Goomba

    >>
    >> Actually the old saw went "Absinthe makes the heart grow fodder".
    >> All in all it is an interesting drink and an acquired taste.
    >> It does not deserve it's bad reputation.
    >> http://www.absinthebuyersguide.com/history.html
    >>
    >> Ken.

    >
    > I've never tasted absinthe, but have read that Pernod is a decent
    > substitute without absinthe's toxic characteristics. I'd say that for
    > many people, Pernod is also an acquired taste. I happen to love it.
    >


    Lush butt !!! ;)

    Michael

    --
    ....Bacteria: The rear entrance to a cafeteria.

    All gramatical errors and misspellings due to Ramsey the cyber kitten. He
    now owns all keyboards and computing devices in the household and has the
    final say on what is, or is not, posted.
    Send email to dog30 at charter dot net
     
  12. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Mon 19 Dec 2005 09:39:11p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Ken
    > Davey?
    >
    >> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >>> On Mon 19 Dec 2005 09:12:04p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Ken
    >>> Davey?
    >>>
    >>>> Goomba38 wrote:
    >>>>> Michael "Dog3" Lonergan wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> ROFL... Absinthe make the brain go yonder.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Michael
    >>>>>>
    >>>>> oh god.. you're killing me here!! LOL
    >>>>> <making note of all the Absinthe jokes>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Goomba
    >>>>
    >>>> Actually the old saw went "Absinthe makes the heart grow fodder".
    >>>> All in all it is an interesting drink and an acquired taste.
    >>>> It does not deserve it's bad reputation.
    >>>> http://www.absinthebuyersguide.com/history.html
    >>>>
    >>>> Ken.
    >>>
    >>> I've never tasted absinthe, but have read that Pernod is a decent
    >>> substitute without absinthe's toxic characteristics. I'd say that
    >>> for many people, Pernod is also an acquired taste. I happen to love
    >>> it.
    >>>

    >>
    >> The toxin in Absinthe is alpha-thujone, generally present in modern
    >> day Absinthe in concentrationsof 10PPM.
    >> http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20000401/fob4.asp
    >>
    >> "In today's absinthe, the most toxic compound is the alcohol"
    >> It (the booze, not the toxin) can be purchased in Canada. Alas - not
    >> cheap.
    >>
    >> Ken.

    >
    > Thanks, Ken! I really would like to taste it sometime.


    Aka 'The Green Fairy'... from what I've read it is to be consumed in a
    special glass and using a special spoon on which a cube of sugar has been
    placed... then you pour the Absinthe over the sugar cube on the spoon into
    the glass. Only the fact of it being banned (at least for a while; I'm not
    up on the current laws) peaks my interest.

    Jill
     
  13. aem

    aem Guest

    jmcquown wrote:
    > Aka 'The Green Fairy'... from what I've read it is to be consumed in a
    > special glass and using a special spoon on which a cube of sugar has been
    > placed... then you pour the Absinthe over the sugar cube on the spoon into
    > the glass. Only the fact of it being banned (at least for a while; I'm not
    > up on the current laws) peaks my interest.
    >

    That would be different from the way we used to drink it in Japan where
    it was (may still be, I dunno) legal. The absinthe was in a small
    glass, you held a sugar cube in a spoon over the glass and then poured
    a little water over the sugar into the absinthe. The water turned the
    absinthe from a clear green to a milky white. The taste was a good
    deal more bitter than Pernod, and the alcohol content was off the
    charts. I never figured out whether it was the absinthe itself that
    made me ralph, or just that I got so drunk from it. All part of the
    perils of being a G.I. -aem
     
  14. On Tue 20 Dec 2005 07:28:07a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Michael
    "Dog3" Lonergan?

    > Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> looking for trouble wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> On Mon 19 Dec 2005 09:12:04p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Ken
    >> Davey?
    >>
    >>> Goomba38 wrote:
    >>>> Michael "Dog3" Lonergan wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> ROFL... Absinthe make the brain go yonder.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Michael
    >>>>>
    >>>> oh god.. you're killing me here!! LOL
    >>>> <making note of all the Absinthe jokes>
    >>>>
    >>>> Goomba
    >>>
    >>> Actually the old saw went "Absinthe makes the heart grow fodder".
    >>> All in all it is an interesting drink and an acquired taste.
    >>> It does not deserve it's bad reputation.
    >>> http://www.absinthebuyersguide.com/history.html
    >>>
    >>> Ken.

    >>
    >> I've never tasted absinthe, but have read that Pernod is a decent
    >> substitute without absinthe's toxic characteristics. I'd say that for
    >> many people, Pernod is also an acquired taste. I happen to love it.
    >>

    >
    > Lush butt !!! ;)
    >
    > Michael
    >


    LOL! Well, I used to be. <g>

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    _____________________________________________

    A chicken in every pot is a *LOT* of chicken!
     
  15. On Tue 20 Dec 2005 04:44:05p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it jmcquown?

    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >> On Mon 19 Dec 2005 09:39:11p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Ken
    >> Davey?
    >>
    >>> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >>>> On Mon 19 Dec 2005 09:12:04p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Ken
    >>>> Davey?
    >>>>
    >>>>> Goomba38 wrote:
    >>>>>> Michael "Dog3" Lonergan wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> ROFL... Absinthe make the brain go yonder.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Michael
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>> oh god.. you're killing me here!! LOL
    >>>>>> <making note of all the Absinthe jokes>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Goomba
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Actually the old saw went "Absinthe makes the heart grow fodder".
    >>>>> All in all it is an interesting drink and an acquired taste.
    >>>>> It does not deserve it's bad reputation.
    >>>>> http://www.absinthebuyersguide.com/history.html
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Ken.
    >>>>
    >>>> I've never tasted absinthe, but have read that Pernod is a decent
    >>>> substitute without absinthe's toxic characteristics. I'd say that
    >>>> for many people, Pernod is also an acquired taste. I happen to love
    >>>> it.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> The toxin in Absinthe is alpha-thujone, generally present in modern
    >>> day Absinthe in concentrationsof 10PPM.
    >>> http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20000401/fob4.asp
    >>>
    >>> "In today's absinthe, the most toxic compound is the alcohol"
    >>> It (the booze, not the toxin) can be purchased in Canada. Alas - not
    >>> cheap.
    >>>
    >>> Ken.

    >>
    >> Thanks, Ken! I really would like to taste it sometime.

    >
    > Aka 'The Green Fairy'... from what I've read it is to be consumed in a
    > special glass and using a special spoon on which a cube of sugar has
    > been placed... then you pour the Absinthe over the sugar cube on the
    > spoon into the glass. Only the fact of it being banned (at least for a
    > while; I'm not up on the current laws) peaks my interest.
    >
    > Jill


    IIRC, it was the drink "Madame X" drowned her sorrows in, in the movie of
    the same name.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    _____________________________________________

    A chicken in every pot is a *LOT* of chicken!
     
  16. In article <[email protected]>,
    Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Ken Davey" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >> Actually the old saw went "Absinthe makes the heart grow fodder".

    >
    > I always thought it was "Absinthe makes the heart grow fonder." Was
    > fodder a typo?


    The old saying was "absence makes the heart grow fonder".

    Oscar Wilde said "Absinthe makes the fond grow hotter".

    I believe that although it's illegal to sell the stuff here in the US,
    it's legal to buy it and to drink it. I've seen ads on various web sites
    for it lately.

    Isaac
     
  17. In article <[email protected]>,
    Isaac Wingfield <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > "Ken Davey" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > > >> Actually the old saw went "Absinthe makes the heart grow fodder".

    > >
    > > I always thought it was "Absinthe makes the heart grow fonder." Was
    > > fodder a typo?

    >
    > The old saying was "absence makes the heart grow fonder".
    >
    > Oscar Wilde said "Absinthe makes the fond grow hotter".
    >
    > I believe that although it's illegal to sell the stuff here in the US,
    > it's legal to buy it and to drink it. I've seen ads on various web sites
    > for it lately.
    >
    > Isaac


    thanks. A fine sentiment however it's expressed, :)
    --
    http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-18-05 - Church review (I think
    I'll become a critic - Rob's been calling me one for years!)
    and a toffee recipe.
     
  18. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    aem wrote:
    > jmcquown wrote:
    >> Aka 'The Green Fairy'... from what I've read it is to be consumed in
    >> a special glass and using a special spoon on which a cube of sugar
    >> has been placed... then you pour the Absinthe over the sugar cube on
    >> the spoon into the glass. Only the fact of it being banned (at
    >> least for a while; I'm not up on the current laws) peaks my interest.
    >>

    > That would be different from the way we used to drink it in Japan
    > where
    > it was (may still be, I dunno) legal. The absinthe was in a small
    > glass, you held a sugar cube in a spoon over the glass and then poured
    > a little water over the sugar into the absinthe. The water turned the
    > absinthe from a clear green to a milky white. The taste was a good
    > deal more bitter than Pernod, and the alcohol content was off the
    > charts. I never figured out whether it was the absinthe itself that
    > made me ralph, or just that I got so drunk from it. All part of the
    > perils of being a G.I. -aem


    You are probably correct. I just remember there was a sugar cube and a
    spoon involved which always conjurs up images of a different sort in my
    mind. I've never had an opportunity to try Absinthe.

    Jill
     
  19. On Wed 21 Dec 2005 09:11:58a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it jmcquown?

    > aem wrote:
    >> jmcquown wrote:
    >>> Aka 'The Green Fairy'... from what I've read it is to be consumed in
    >>> a special glass and using a special spoon on which a cube of sugar
    >>> has been placed... then you pour the Absinthe over the sugar cube on
    >>> the spoon into the glass. Only the fact of it being banned (at
    >>> least for a while; I'm not up on the current laws) peaks my interest.
    >>>

    >> That would be different from the way we used to drink it in Japan
    >> where it was (may still be, I dunno) legal. The absinthe was in a
    >> small glass, you held a sugar cube in a spoon over the glass and then
    >> poured a little water over the sugar into the absinthe. The water
    >> turned the absinthe from a clear green to a milky white. The taste
    >> was a good deal more bitter than Pernod, and the alcohol content was
    >> off the charts. I never figured out whether it was the absinthe
    >> itself that made me ralph, or just that I got so drunk from it. All
    >> part of the perils of being a G.I. -aem


    Adding water to Pernod also turns it a milky white. But the same is true
    when you add water to Pine-Sol. <g>

    > You are probably correct. I just remember there was a sugar cube and a
    > spoon involved which always conjurs up images of a different sort in my
    > mind. I've never had an opportunity to try Absinthe.
    >
    > Jill


    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    _____________________________________________

    A chicken in every pot is a *LOT* of chicken!
     
  20. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    aem wrote:

    > That would be different from the way we used to drink it in Japan where
    > it was (may still be, I dunno) legal. The absinthe was in a small
    > glass, you held a sugar cube in a spoon over the glass and then poured
    > a little water over the sugar into the absinthe. The water turned the
    > absinthe from a clear green to a milky white. The taste was a good
    > deal more bitter than Pernod, and the alcohol content was off the
    > charts. I never figured out whether it was the absinthe itself that
    > made me ralph, or just that I got so drunk from it. All part of the
    > perils of being a G.I. -aem


    It was probably the alcohol. My son orders it by mail from the Czech Republic. I
    would not recommend it to anyone who does not like Pernod, which is not one of my
    favourites. And Absinthe packs a heck of a wallop.
     
Loading...