Find spokes for the shimano wh-r535 wheels

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by mrvlhs, Mar 18, 2016.

  1. mrvlhs

    mrvlhs New Member

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    I have the front wheel damaged so I'm thinking about either selling the spokes or getting more. Does anyone know where I could get them and for what price? No luck searching for now.

    Also, I'd appreciate if someone has some guide on how to remove the spokes on these weird wheels.

    PS: I've been looking all around but I can't find the part number for the spokes nor the nipples, so it would be of great help to know that.

    Thank you in advance!
     

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  2. mrvlhs

    mrvlhs New Member

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    Another pic. Also, what would be an equivalent set of wheels nowadays?

    [​IMG]
     
    #2 mrvlhs, Mar 18, 2016
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2016
  3. e_guevara

    e_guevara New Member

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    That is a pretty old wheelset. It's pretty hard looking for replacement spokes for that. A shop near where I work sell replacement spokes for those wheels. It's also difficult to true those wheels because of the lacing pattern.

    I suggest replacing/upgrading your wheelset. The new line of Shimano's entry-level wheels are the RS (road sport) series. Look at the RS10, RS11, and RS21 models.
     
  4. mrvlhs

    mrvlhs New Member

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    Do you believe those would be an upgrade? I'd still like to know the part number of the spokes and nipples though.
     
  5. e_guevara

    e_guevara New Member

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    Here's an online retailer for Shimano wheel parts (spioke + nipples)

    http://www.moruyabicycles.com.au/contents/en-uk/d58_spokes-shimano.html

    If you scroll down all the way to WH-R535 you will see that the part is longer available (red Shimano item code).

    Doing a Google search for the part number (Y4AC98030) this comes up

    http://www.eurobike.si/en/napera-shimano-y4ac98030.html

    But at 5.00EUR/pc I don't think it's worth it. Plus you would need a special spoke wrench to true the wheel.

    Any of the models I have recommended above is going to be an upgrade from the R535.
     
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  6. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Every season, it seems, we get a customer with one of these with a broken spoke and doesn't want to spring for a new wheel. If we can salvage the washer, we use an inverted straight gauge spoke with an oversize nipple. And tell them there are better wheels available now.
     
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  7. mrvlhs

    mrvlhs New Member

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    I'll probably upgrade to one of those models and see what I can get for these. Thank you guys!
     
  8. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    In defense of those customers...I never sprung for new wheels just because of a popped spoke.

    I take your point about shimNO's (and every manufacturer for that matter) planned obsolescence and short product life cycles.

    If OEM spokes can be found for a reasonable price I would buy a half-dozen and use the wheels for training until the rims cracked.

    And I'll add another vote for the RS21/RS24 shimaNO wheels as being good for training, durable and (at this point in time, at least) rebuildable. They are almost a give away price when found on sale at the online stores.
     
  9. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    When making a decision on a damaged component, you have to look at the extent of the damage, the probability of the damage recurring, the availability of replacement parts, and the lifecycle of the component. In this case we're looking at a novel wheel design that was new around 14 years ago, that was played out around 2007 (if not earlier), for which replacement spokes are virtually impossible to find. And the warranty expired.

    What else do you need?

    I've got wheels from the '70s and '80s that get used and maintained that I won't give up on until I can't get spare parts.
     
  10. Mr. Beanz

    Mr. Beanz Well-Known Member

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    Throw them in the trash! You are talking about a damaged FRONT wheel here. You could be setting up another rider for serious injury for a few measly bucks. :(
     
  11. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    I've never been a fan of paired-spoke wheels. Santana thinks they are strong enough to offer as both standard and upgrade wheels on highly stressed racing and touring tandems using both disc brake and rim brake variants. Evidently, spare pieces parts are still available?



    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    http://santanatandem.com/Techno/Sweet16.html

    Didn't Rolf, Bontrager and Lightweight offer similar spoking once upon a time? Like Campagnolo's 'G3' spoke pattern, being different has its disadvantages when it comes to replacement parts and service.

    Looks like $125-$150 for a decent used set of 535's or 540's on eBay, plus shipping. At those prices the newer shimaNO models are a much better way to go.
     

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    #11 CAMPYBOB, Mar 30, 2016
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2016
  12. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Presuming the rim isn't damaged, couldn't the wheel be re-built with a set of off-the-shelf 14g spokes?

    And, presuming the hubs are 'good' BUT if the rim (on almost any wheel) is damaged, couldn't a replacement rim with equidistantly spaced spoke holes be used?

    For example, I have a similar vintage Dura Ace 7700 wheelset whose hubs I have temporarily laced to some off-the-shelf 16h (Alex) rims ...

    I just (well over a half dozen years later!!) haven't gotten around to cutting the J-bend off & threading the ends.
    Yes, it's less than an ideal situation ... perhaps dodgy ... but, they are nice hubs which are worth using ...

    OR, it has been a case of throwing good-money-after-bad (for the rims) + it will (eventually) be the time it will take to unlace the rims & "cut" (actually, roll) the threads & then re-lacing & tensioning the spokes!?!
    I think that ONLY (?) wheels which use T-ended spokes (like MAVIC's) would be difficult to rebuild with standard spokes.
     
  13. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Sort of what I said, alf, and I've been doing it for customers who aren't ready to spring for new wheels. These wheels have a J-shaped spoke, but the direction is reversed. The J goes into the rim with a proprietary alloy washer, and exits through the side, above the braking flat. The nipple is at the hub in a kind of nailhead arrangement.

    Shimano made a spoke wrench that worked from the bottom of the nipple. One problem is when you use standard nipples, you need to use a standard spoke wrench, and it's tight quarters at the hub end of things. So you don't want to true a wheel with 16 of these. But it can be done if you have a thing for these wheels and you have a the time. Most shops won't touch them. The last time I saw one that wasn't in our shop for repair was hanging from a hook over the counter at Boulder Sports Recycling. That was a few years ago. Maybe it's still there.

    Bontrager gave up on paired spokes around 2008 or '09. The spokes tended to crack at the nipple, especially under heavier riders. We'll occasionally get one for truing that isn't cracked. Most of them in our area have either been replaced or are sitting in garages on bikes that are no longer used. Giant had a paired-spoke wheel, too but that disappeared around the same time. It seemed more durable, but it was a lot heavier than the Bontragers. Campagnolo's boutique wheels used standard radial spoking in front and a triple pattern in the rear--one radial spoke from one side and a pair of tangential spokes from the other..This is sort of like Mavic's pattern, except Mavic spaced the spokes evenly around the wheel.

    By passing the spoke through the side of the rim Shimano seems to have made a stronger wheel. But my rule is, if more than two or three spokes have broken, or they're starting to break more frequently, it's time to do something drastic. That is, either rebuild the wheel with new spokes and rim, or get a new wheel. The quality and condition of the hub, and the availability of spokes and rims will guide that decision.

    It looks like Rolf is still making these wheels, but every Rolf wheel I've seen was on a bike that was at least eight years old. Maybe the triathletes are still buying Rolf wheels.

    And "skip-lacing" a standard rim to work with a paired-spoke hub doesn't work because the holes in the hub are not at regular intervals and the skew between the left and right flanges does not correlate to the drill patter of a standard rim. I imagine someone out there has done this, but it would require different length spokes on the same side of the wheel.
     
  14. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Rolf sponsored a couple of ProTour/Pro continental teams for awhile...no clue if they still do. I just cruised their website and they are still into the paired-spoke format big time. They're manufacturing carbon tubs and clinchers in that format, but using what look like conventional J-Head spokes mounted in the conventional position.

    I still have a Park Tool shimaNO spoke wrench for the inverted J-Head spokes. Probably make a good museum tool along with my BB taps.
     
  15. mrvlhs

    mrvlhs New Member

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    I wouldn't be selling the wheel as new, in fact, it's pretty clear that it is damaged. In any case, my intention is to sell the spokes, nipples and hub in case someone actually needs to fix a good wheel instead of throwing hard to find material in the trash. At least if I broke a spoke on them I'd rather replace it than spend a heavy bill on new wheels. To each it's own.
     
  16. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FYI/FWIW. The WH-7700 wheelset used a J-bend spoke, too, along with the special "washers" to reinforce the poorly spec'd extrusion ...

    Not that Shimano cares what I think, but I think that passing the spoke through the sidewall of the rim was another one of those WTF ideas which Shimano has (fortunately!?!) abandoned ...

    Which is to say that (as actually implemented) I don't think that Shimano made the wheel "stronger" ... EITHER the extrusion needed to be more robust OR the alloy needed to be different OR the washer needed to be re-engineered ...

    It's not that a regular rim can't be cracked ... but, there were probably a lot of cracked Shimano rims due to insufficient load spreading with those special "washers" ...

    As YOU may-or-may-not recall, the holes in older low profile rims were offset from the center-line of the rim for presumably the same effect of amplifying the spoke's entry angle ...

    A lot of presumably 'good ideas' were abandoned when the use of stainless steel spokes became the norm.​

    The BONTRAGER wheels probably cracked because someone decided that less than 24 spokes would be okay OR the spokes were tensioned to too high an amount for the rim's specs.
    BTW. As far as tensioning the spokes, a FLAT HEAD screwdriver which will fit into the hub's recess could be used to adjust the tension on the spokes, and while a a special tool might be nice, it was/is not necessary.

    BTW2. As I mentioned, I long-ago laced my WH-7700 hubs to equidistant 16h rims ... the dodgy part is that there will be (is!) a slight bend in the spoke at the hub end (so, ideally there will be NO exposed threads at that end of those spokes!!!) ...

    Since the spokes are not tensioned, yet, it's not clear that the interlaced spokes will actually make contact & thereby provide any lateral resistance.

    Obviously, re-threading the OTHER END (i.e., the J-bend end) of the spokes is a low priority for me.


     
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