Finding a mirror that is not a piece of crap...

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Reid Priedhorsky, Sep 2, 2004.

  1. Hello all,

    I'd like to find a mirror that works for me and isn't a piece of crap.
    I've been having trouble in this. I'd like the following:

    1. Attached to the handlebars (drop bars) in the vicinity of the left
    brake lever. (Head-mounted mirrors I find disorienting, and bar-end
    mirrors are placed too low.)

    2. Stiffly attached to the bars. No wiggly plastic bits to amplify
    vibrations.

    3. Holds adjustment well, and proper adjustment is easy to recover after
    being bumped.

    4. Reasonably sturdy and resistant to breakage.

    Currently I have a Blackburn mirror which fails all but #1.

    Does such a beast exist?

    Reid
     
    Tags:


  2. Mike Schwab

    Mike Schwab Guest

    I prefer a mirror built into my helmet. http://www.reevu.com

    Reid Priedhorsky wrote:
    >
    > Hello all,
    >
    > I'd like to find a mirror that works for me and isn't a piece of crap.
    > I've been having trouble in this. I'd like the following:
    >
    > 1. Attached to the handlebars (drop bars) in the vicinity of the left
    > brake lever. (Head-mounted mirrors I find disorienting, and bar-end
    > mirrors are placed too low.)
    >
    > 2. Stiffly attached to the bars. No wiggly plastic bits to amplify
    > vibrations.
    >
    > 3. Holds adjustment well, and proper adjustment is easy to recover after
    > being bumped.
    >
    > 4. Reasonably sturdy and resistant to breakage.
    >
    > Currently I have a Blackburn mirror which fails all but #1.
    >
    > Does such a beast exist?
    >
    > Reid
     
  3. Reid Priedhorsky wrote:

    > I'd like to find a mirror that works for me and isn't a piece of crap.


    Mirrycle are the only bike-mounted ones I've ever found any good. The firm
    has come and gone a few times, I understand, but if you shop around they can
    definitely still be had.

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at Washington
    University
     
  4. GaryG

    GaryG Guest

    "Reid Priedhorsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > Hello all,
    >
    > I'd like to find a mirror that works for me and isn't a piece of crap.
    > I've been having trouble in this. I'd like the following:
    >
    > 1. Attached to the handlebars (drop bars) in the vicinity of the left
    > brake lever. (Head-mounted mirrors I find disorienting, and bar-end
    > mirrors are placed too low.)
    >
    > 2. Stiffly attached to the bars. No wiggly plastic bits to amplify
    > vibrations.
    >
    > 3. Holds adjustment well, and proper adjustment is easy to recover after
    > being bumped.
    >
    > 4. Reasonably sturdy and resistant to breakage.
    >
    > Currently I have a Blackburn mirror which fails all but #1.
    >
    > Does such a beast exist?
    >
    > Reid


    I have tried a number of different mirror styles. For bar-mounted mirrors,
    the only one I liked was the Cateye bar-end mirror. It's cheap, and
    provides a good sized view. Unfortunately, like all bar mounted mirrors, it
    suffers from vibration. The Cateye was better than most in this regard and
    worked reasonably well on smooth roads. But, on "chip and seal" roads it
    vibrated so much as to be nearly useless.

    By far the best mirror I have ever used is the "Take a Look" mirror. It
    attaches to your glasses, is highly adjustable, and provides a large clear
    field of vision. It's made in America from steel and brass, and is of a
    much higher quality than the similarly mounted Third Eye mirrors.

    Here are some reviews for the Take a Look:

    http://users.rcn.com/icebike/Equipment/cyclingmirrors.htm

    http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/Extras/product_86204.shtml


    --
    ~_-*
    ....G/ \G
    http://www.CycliStats.com
    CycliStats - Software for Cyclists
     
  5. Jeff Starr

    Jeff Starr Guest

    On Thu, 02 Sep 2004 20:33:00 -0500, Reid Priedhorsky
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hello all,
    >
    >I'd like to find a mirror that works for me and isn't a piece of crap.
    >I've been having trouble in this. I'd like the following:
    >
    >1. Attached to the handlebars (drop bars) in the vicinity of the left
    >brake lever. (Head-mounted mirrors I find disorienting, and bar-end
    >mirrors are placed too low.)
    >
    >2. Stiffly attached to the bars. No wiggly plastic bits to amplify
    >vibrations.
    >
    >3. Holds adjustment well, and proper adjustment is easy to recover after
    >being bumped.
    >
    >4. Reasonably sturdy and resistant to breakage.
    >
    >Currently I have a Blackburn mirror which fails all but #1.
    >
    >Does such a beast exist?
    >
    >Reid


    Hi, I use a Blackburn that is made to mount on the brakehood, but I
    mount it to the lower curve of the drop bar.
    Mine has held up well, once adjusted, stays in place, although it did
    take a couple of rides for it to settle in.
    My only complaint is that it mildly interferes with my riding in that
    part of the drop, although I can do it. I spend most of my riding time
    on the hoods, and there it was in the way.

    If you email me, I can send you photos of how mine is mounted. Just
    swap people for animal.


    Life is Good!
    Jeff
     
  6. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    GaryG wrote:
    :: "Reid Priedhorsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    :: news:p[email protected]
    ::: Hello all,
    :::
    ::: I'd like to find a mirror that works for me and isn't a piece of
    ::: crap. I've been having trouble in this. I'd like the following:
    :::
    ::: 1. Attached to the handlebars (drop bars) in the vicinity of the
    ::: left brake lever. (Head-mounted mirrors I find disorienting, and
    ::: bar-end mirrors are placed too low.)
    :::
    ::: 2. Stiffly attached to the bars. No wiggly plastic bits to amplify
    ::: vibrations.
    :::
    ::: 3. Holds adjustment well, and proper adjustment is easy to recover
    ::: after being bumped.
    :::
    ::: 4. Reasonably sturdy and resistant to breakage.
    :::
    ::: Currently I have a Blackburn mirror which fails all but #1.
    :::
    ::: Does such a beast exist?
    :::
    ::: Reid
    ::
    :: I have tried a number of different mirror styles. For bar-mounted
    :: mirrors, the only one I liked was the Cateye bar-end mirror. It's
    :: cheap, and provides a good sized view. Unfortunately, like all bar
    :: mounted mirrors, it suffers from vibration. The Cateye was better
    :: than most in this regard and worked reasonably well on smooth roads.
    :: But, on "chip and seal" roads it vibrated so much as to be nearly
    :: useless.
    ::
    :: By far the best mirror I have ever used is the "Take a Look" mirror.
    :: It attaches to your glasses, is highly adjustable, and provides a
    :: large clear field of vision. It's made in America from steel and
    :: brass, and is of a much higher quality than the similarly mounted
    :: Third Eye mirrors.
    ::
    :: Here are some reviews for the Take a Look:
    ::
    :: http://users.rcn.com/icebike/Equipment/cyclingmirrors.htm
    ::
    :: http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/Extras/product_86204.shtml


    Do you have the long or short version?
     
  7. GaryG

    GaryG Guest

    "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > GaryG wrote:
    > :: "Reid Priedhorsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > :: news:p[email protected]
    > ::: Hello all,
    > :::
    > ::: I'd like to find a mirror that works for me and isn't a piece of
    > ::: crap. I've been having trouble in this. I'd like the following:
    > :::
    > ::: 1. Attached to the handlebars (drop bars) in the vicinity of the
    > ::: left brake lever. (Head-mounted mirrors I find disorienting, and
    > ::: bar-end mirrors are placed too low.)
    > :::
    > ::: 2. Stiffly attached to the bars. No wiggly plastic bits to amplify
    > ::: vibrations.
    > :::
    > ::: 3. Holds adjustment well, and proper adjustment is easy to recover
    > ::: after being bumped.
    > :::
    > ::: 4. Reasonably sturdy and resistant to breakage.
    > :::
    > ::: Currently I have a Blackburn mirror which fails all but #1.
    > :::
    > ::: Does such a beast exist?
    > :::
    > ::: Reid
    > ::
    > :: I have tried a number of different mirror styles. For bar-mounted
    > :: mirrors, the only one I liked was the Cateye bar-end mirror. It's
    > :: cheap, and provides a good sized view. Unfortunately, like all bar
    > :: mounted mirrors, it suffers from vibration. The Cateye was better
    > :: than most in this regard and worked reasonably well on smooth roads.
    > :: But, on "chip and seal" roads it vibrated so much as to be nearly
    > :: useless.
    > ::
    > :: By far the best mirror I have ever used is the "Take a Look" mirror.
    > :: It attaches to your glasses, is highly adjustable, and provides a
    > :: large clear field of vision. It's made in America from steel and
    > :: brass, and is of a much higher quality than the similarly mounted
    > :: Third Eye mirrors.
    > ::
    > :: Here are some reviews for the Take a Look:
    > ::
    > :: http://users.rcn.com/icebike/Equipment/cyclingmirrors.htm
    > ::
    > :: http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/Extras/product_86204.shtml
    >
    >
    > Do you have the long or short version?
    >


    I have the long version. I might try the short version at some point, but I
    suspect that my 50-something eyes would not be able to focus it well.

    FWIW, I tried one of those tiny, stick-on-inside-the-glasses-lens mirrors a
    couple of years back, and found it completely worthless due to the focus
    issue.

    GG
     
  8. Rich Clark

    Rich Clark Guest

    "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > :: Here are some reviews for the Take a Look:
    > ::
    > :: http://users.rcn.com/icebike/Equipment/cyclingmirrors.htm
    > ::
    > :: http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/Extras/product_86204.shtml
    >
    >
    > Do you have the long or short version?


    ??

    I've used a Take-A-Look for years, swear by it; using it is so natural to me
    it's like part of my head. I miss it when I'm walking down the street.

    I never saw more than one version. Is the version that's been widely sold
    everywhere for the last many years the "long" one or the "short" one? And
    where have you seen more than one version? (Aside from the fact that the
    same mirror is sold with and without a helmet adapter, and in
    left-side/right side versions.)

    RichC (having a hard time imagining why there needs to be more than one
    length)
     
  9. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    GaryG wrote:
    :: "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    :: news:[email protected]
    ::: GaryG wrote:
    ::::: "Reid Priedhorsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    ::::: news:p[email protected]
    :::::: Hello all,
    ::::::
    :::::: I'd like to find a mirror that works for me and isn't a piece of
    :::::: crap. I've been having trouble in this. I'd like the following:
    ::::::
    :::::: 1. Attached to the handlebars (drop bars) in the vicinity of the
    :::::: left brake lever. (Head-mounted mirrors I find disorienting, and
    :::::: bar-end mirrors are placed too low.)
    ::::::
    :::::: 2. Stiffly attached to the bars. No wiggly plastic bits to
    :::::: amplify vibrations.
    ::::::
    :::::: 3. Holds adjustment well, and proper adjustment is easy to
    :::::: recover after being bumped.
    ::::::
    :::::: 4. Reasonably sturdy and resistant to breakage.
    ::::::
    :::::: Currently I have a Blackburn mirror which fails all but #1.
    ::::::
    :::::: Does such a beast exist?
    ::::::
    :::::: Reid
    :::::
    ::::: I have tried a number of different mirror styles. For bar-mounted
    ::::: mirrors, the only one I liked was the Cateye bar-end mirror. It's
    ::::: cheap, and provides a good sized view. Unfortunately, like all
    ::::: bar mounted mirrors, it suffers from vibration. The Cateye was
    ::::: better than most in this regard and worked reasonably well on
    ::::: smooth roads. But, on "chip and seal" roads it vibrated so much
    ::::: as to be nearly useless.
    :::::
    ::::: By far the best mirror I have ever used is the "Take a Look"
    ::::: mirror. It attaches to your glasses, is highly adjustable, and
    ::::: provides a large clear field of vision. It's made in America
    ::::: from steel and brass, and is of a much higher quality than the
    ::::: similarly mounted Third Eye mirrors.
    :::::
    ::::: Here are some reviews for the Take a Look:
    :::::
    ::::: http://users.rcn.com/icebike/Equipment/cyclingmirrors.htm
    :::::
    ::::: http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/Extras/product_86204.shtml
    :::
    :::
    ::: Do you have the long or short version?
    :::
    ::
    :: I have the long version. I might try the short version at some
    :: point, but I suspect that my 50-something eyes would not be able to
    :: focus it well.
    ::
    :: FWIW, I tried one of those tiny, stick-on-inside-the-glasses-lens
    :: mirrors a couple of years back, and found it completely worthless
    :: due to the focus issue.

    Good info. One guy, on the second link you gave, did comment that he
    thought the shorter version was superior because of the need for less head
    motion to get a good rear view. Maybe he has a long neck :)

    I would not be able to function with a stick-on mirror. funny how, in
    cycling, so many of the products are poorly suited for their intended task.
    You'd think a rag like Bicycling would scout and root out all of the
    ill-suited products.

    ::
    :: GG
     
  10. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    Rich Clark wrote:
    :: "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    :: news:[email protected]
    ::::: Here are some reviews for the Take a Look:
    :::::
    ::::: http://users.rcn.com/icebike/Equipment/cyclingmirrors.htm
    :::::
    ::::: http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/Extras/product_86204.shtml
    :::
    :::
    ::: Do you have the long or short version?
    ::
    :: ??
    ::
    :: I've used a Take-A-Look for years, swear by it; using it is so
    :: natural to me it's like part of my head. I miss it when I'm walking
    :: down the street.

    Thanks for the recommendation.

    ::
    :: I never saw more than one version. Is the version that's been widely
    :: sold everywhere for the last many years the "long" one or the
    :: "short" one?

    Yes, according to my conversation with the wife and the man that make them
    this morning. One is about 5 inches long and the other is about 3 inches
    long.

    And where have you seen more than one version? (Aside
    :: from the fact that the same mirror is sold with and without a helmet
    :: adapter, and in left-side/right side versions.)

    See above.

    ::
    :: RichC (having a hard time imagining why there needs to be more than
    :: one length)

    http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/Extras/product_86204.shtml

    "1. The LONG version is way too long for use on eyeglasses. It sticks out
    way to far, which means that you have to pop your head up further to get a
    view behind you, and it is always catching on things if you wear it off the
    bike. Get the short one for eyeglasses, and the long one for helmet-mount. "
     
  11. Badger_South

    Badger_South Guest

    On Fri, 3 Sep 2004 12:35:40 -0400, "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Good info. One guy, on the second link you gave, did comment that he
    >thought the shorter version was superior because of the need for less head
    >motion to get a good rear view. Maybe he has a long neck :)
    >
    >I would not be able to function with a stick-on mirror. funny how, in
    >cycling, so many of the products are poorly suited for their intended task.
    >You'd think a rag like Bicycling would scout and root out all of the
    >ill-suited products.


    FWIW, I've now adapted really well to the third-eye type of mirror,
    although it took a week of fiddling to get it adjusted. At first it seemed
    like I needed to look down and then turn slightly, and it was a bit
    annoying and difficult to get adjusted to, but now I use it all the time.
    Just a quick, and slight turn of the head and I've got a good view of the
    traffic behind - it seems very natural.

    -B
     
  12. GaryG

    GaryG Guest

    "Rich Clark" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > :: Here are some reviews for the Take a Look:
    > > ::
    > > :: http://users.rcn.com/icebike/Equipment/cyclingmirrors.htm
    > > ::
    > > :: http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/Extras/product_86204.shtml
    > >
    > >
    > > Do you have the long or short version?

    >
    > ??
    >
    > I've used a Take-A-Look for years, swear by it; using it is so natural to

    me
    > it's like part of my head. I miss it when I'm walking down the street.
    >
    > I never saw more than one version. Is the version that's been widely sold
    > everywhere for the last many years the "long" one or the "short" one? And
    > where have you seen more than one version? (Aside from the fact that the
    > same mirror is sold with and without a helmet adapter, and in
    > left-side/right side versions.)
    >
    > RichC (having a hard time imagining why there needs to be more than one
    > length)
    >


    The Long version is the original model. I think the shorter version was
    just released in the last few years. Most of my riding friends use the long
    version, and none of us has noticed any problems with using it. The
    situational awareness provided by this mirror is outstanding - I always know
    exactly where cars are in the lane behind me, and can keep a close eye on
    them as they pass. Much easier than trying to listen for overtaking traffic
    (wind noise and modern cars/tires make this problematic), or twisting around
    to look over your shoulder.

    --
    ~_-*
    ....G/ \G
    http://www.CycliStats.com
    CycliStats - Software for Cyclists
     
  13. Don DeMair

    Don DeMair Guest

    "Reid Priedhorsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > Hello all,
    >
    > I'd like to find a mirror that works for me and isn't a piece of crap.
    > I've been having trouble in this. I'd like the following:
    >
    > 1. Attached to the handlebars (drop bars) in the vicinity of the left
    > brake lever. (Head-mounted mirrors I find disorienting, and bar-end
    > mirrors are placed too low.)
    >
    > 2. Stiffly attached to the bars. No wiggly plastic bits to amplify
    > vibrations.
    >
    > 3. Holds adjustment well, and proper adjustment is easy to recover after
    > being bumped.
    >
    > 4. Reasonably sturdy and resistant to breakage.
    >
    > Currently I have a Blackburn mirror which fails all but #1.
    >
    > Does such a beast exist?
    >
    > Reid


    I have the Third Eye bar end mirror. Unlike other bar end mirrors that I've
    seen, this one does not have an arm that moves the mirror further out. It
    plugs directly into the end of the bar. When I look back I catch a view of
    a little of my thigh, but that's much like any car rear view mirror. It
    does vibrate a little on rough roads, but it's fine for 80% of the riding I
    do. I think the arm on the other models accentuates the vibration.

    You can see the one I'm talking about here:
    http://www.3rd-eye.com/welcome.html. Even though they show it on a straight
    bar, it works fine on drop bars too. I monitor traffic with it and if the
    road is straight, I can even make left-hand turns without turning around
    (but I don't recommend it).

    Ride on, behind aware,
    Don
     
  14. Roger Zoul wrote:

    >
    > You'd think a rag like Bicycling would scout and root out all of the
    > ill-suited products.


    Hah!

    Buycycling exists to make you buy products. They sell _you_ to their
    advertisers.

    Oh, they have to do a token "product sacrifice" once in a while, to keep
    the newbies fooled, but root out _all_ the unsuitable products? No way,
    never.


    "The multi-colored high-intensity-discharge spoke illuminator was
    somewhat dim in 'puce' mode. For $500, we expected better. We give it
    just four chainwheels out of five."


    --
    Frank Krygowski [To reply, remove rodent and vegetable dot com.
    Substitute cc dot ysu dot
    edu]
     
  15. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    Frank Krygowski wrote:
    :: Roger Zoul wrote:
    ::
    :::
    ::: You'd think a rag like Bicycling would scout and root out all of the
    ::: ill-suited products.
    ::
    :: Hah!
    ::
    :: Buycycling exists to make you buy products. They sell _you_ to their
    :: advertisers.
    ::
    :: Oh, they have to do a token "product sacrifice" once in a while, to
    :: keep the newbies fooled, but root out _all_ the unsuitable products?
    :: No way, never.
    ::
    ::
    :: "The multi-colored high-intensity-discharge spoke illuminator was
    :: somewhat dim in 'puce' mode. For $500, we expected better. We
    :: give it just four chainwheels out of five."

    I guess there are just not enough cyclist spending money in the US to make a
    good rag worthwhile, like those for computers and home theater equipment?

    That seems hard to believe. My subscription to Buycycling is ending soon
    and will not be renewed. I'm going to let them know why.
     
  16. Bill

    Bill Guest

    "Don DeMair" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > I have the Third Eye bar end mirror. Unlike other bar end mirrors that

    I've
    > seen, this one does not have an arm that moves the mirror further out. It
    > plugs directly into the end of the bar. When I look back I catch a view

    of
    > a little of my thigh, but that's much like any car rear view mirror. It
    > does vibrate a little on rough roads, but it's fine for 80% of the riding

    I
    > do. I think the arm on the other models accentuates the vibration.
    >
    > You can see the one I'm talking about here:
    > http://www.3rd-eye.com/welcome.html. Even though they show it on a

    straight
    > bar, it works fine on drop bars too. I monitor traffic with it and if the
    > road is straight, I can even make left-hand turns without turning around
    > (but I don't recommend it).
    >
    > Ride on, behind aware,
    > Don
    >
    >

    Third Eye bar end gets my vote. I've been using them on all my bikes for at
    least 10 years. They are harde enough to find that I keep a spare. Position
    makes the view to the rear very natural. No more difficult than the rear
    view mirror in the car. Very little vibration because it plugs directly into
    the bar with no extension to amplify movement. My only complaint is that it
    won't work with my touring bike with bar-end shifters. I'm right eye
    dominant so helmet mirrors aren't satisfactory.
    Bill Brannon
     
  17. DaveH

    DaveH Guest

    On Fri, 03 Sep 2004 19:42:09 GMT, "Don DeMair"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Reid Priedhorsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:p[email protected]
    >> Hello all,
    >>
    >> I'd like to find a mirror that works for me and isn't a piece of crap.
    >> I've been having trouble in this. I'd like the following:
    >>
    >> 1. Attached to the handlebars (drop bars) in the vicinity of the left
    >> brake lever. (Head-mounted mirrors I find disorienting, and bar-end
    >> mirrors are placed too low.)
    >>
    >> 2. Stiffly attached to the bars. No wiggly plastic bits to amplify
    >> vibrations.
    >>
    >> 3. Holds adjustment well, and proper adjustment is easy to recover after
    >> being bumped.
    >>
    >> 4. Reasonably sturdy and resistant to breakage.
    >>
    >> Currently I have a Blackburn mirror which fails all but #1.
    >>
    >> Does such a beast exist?
    >>
    >> Reid

    >
    >I have the Third Eye bar end mirror. Unlike other bar end mirrors that I've
    >seen, this one does not have an arm that moves the mirror further out. It
    >plugs directly into the end of the bar. When I look back I catch a view of
    >a little of my thigh, but that's much like any car rear view mirror. It
    >does vibrate a little on rough roads, but it's fine for 80% of the riding I
    >do. I think the arm on the other models accentuates the vibration.
    >
    >You can see the one I'm talking about here:
    >http://www.3rd-eye.com/welcome.html. Even though they show it on a straight
    >bar, it works fine on drop bars too. I monitor traffic with it and if the
    >road is straight, I can even make left-hand turns without turning around
    >(but I don't recommend it).
    >
    >Ride on, behind aware,
    >Don
    >

    The Zefal round mirror with right-angle arm portion of mount removed
    and mounted on the bar end doesn't vibrate at all.

    I purposely had my bike set up with bar-end shifter for rear and down
    tube shifter for front derailleur to accomodate the Zefal.

    Trouble is, Don does not want a bar-end mount mirror.
    Dave
     
  18. Bill

    Bill Guest

    "DaveH" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Fri, 03 Sep 2004 19:42:09 GMT, "Don DeMair"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"Reid Priedhorsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:p[email protected]
    > >> Hello all,
    > >>
    > >> I'd like to find a mirror that works for me and isn't a piece of crap.
    > >> I've been having trouble in this. I'd like the following:
    > >>
    > >> 1. Attached to the handlebars (drop bars) in the vicinity of the left
    > >> brake lever. (Head-mounted mirrors I find disorienting, and bar-end
    > >> mirrors are placed too low.)
    > >>
    > >> 2. Stiffly attached to the bars. No wiggly plastic bits to amplify
    > >> vibrations.
    > >>
    > >> 3. Holds adjustment well, and proper adjustment is easy to recover

    after
    > >> being bumped.
    > >>
    > >> 4. Reasonably sturdy and resistant to breakage.
    > >>
    > >> Currently I have a Blackburn mirror which fails all but #1.
    > >>
    > >> Does such a beast exist?
    > >>
    > >> Reid

    > >
    > >I have the Third Eye bar end mirror. Unlike other bar end mirrors that

    I've
    > >seen, this one does not have an arm that moves the mirror further out.

    It
    > >plugs directly into the end of the bar. When I look back I catch a view

    of
    > >a little of my thigh, but that's much like any car rear view mirror. It
    > >does vibrate a little on rough roads, but it's fine for 80% of the riding

    I
    > >do. I think the arm on the other models accentuates the vibration.
    > >
    > >You can see the one I'm talking about here:
    > >http://www.3rd-eye.com/welcome.html. Even though they show it on a

    straight
    > >bar, it works fine on drop bars too. I monitor traffic with it and if

    the
    > >road is straight, I can even make left-hand turns without turning around
    > >(but I don't recommend it).
    > >
    > >Ride on, behind aware,
    > >Don
    > >

    > The Zefal round mirror with right-angle arm portion of mount removed
    > and mounted on the bar end doesn't vibrate at all.
    >
    > I purposely had my bike set up with bar-end shifter for rear and down
    > tube shifter for front derailleur to accomodate the Zefal.
    >
    > Trouble is, Don does not want a bar-end mount mirror.
    > Dave
    >

    Don's got a bar end mirror. Reid might benefit from looking beyond his
    preconceptions unless he is so far forward that he'd have to look back
    instead of glancing down to see an effective bar end mirror.
    Bill Brannon
     
  19. DaveH

    DaveH Guest

    On Fri, 03 Sep 2004 23:03:51 GMT, "Bill" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"DaveH" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> On Fri, 03 Sep 2004 19:42:09 GMT, "Don DeMair"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> >
    >> >"Reid Priedhorsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >news:p[email protected]
    >> >> Hello all,
    >> >>
    >> >> I'd like to find a mirror that works for me and isn't a piece of crap.
    >> >> I've been having trouble in this. I'd like the following:
    >> >>
    >> >> 1. Attached to the handlebars (drop bars) in the vicinity of the left
    >> >> brake lever. (Head-mounted mirrors I find disorienting, and bar-end
    >> >> mirrors are placed too low.)
    >> >>
    >> >> 2. Stiffly attached to the bars. No wiggly plastic bits to amplify
    >> >> vibrations.
    >> >>
    >> >> 3. Holds adjustment well, and proper adjustment is easy to recover

    >after
    >> >> being bumped.
    >> >>
    >> >> 4. Reasonably sturdy and resistant to breakage.
    >> >>
    >> >> Currently I have a Blackburn mirror which fails all but #1.
    >> >>
    >> >> Does such a beast exist?
    >> >>
    >> >> Reid
    >> >
    >> >I have the Third Eye bar end mirror. Unlike other bar end mirrors that

    >I've
    >> >seen, this one does not have an arm that moves the mirror further out.

    >It
    >> >plugs directly into the end of the bar. When I look back I catch a view

    >of
    >> >a little of my thigh, but that's much like any car rear view mirror. It
    >> >does vibrate a little on rough roads, but it's fine for 80% of the riding

    >I
    >> >do. I think the arm on the other models accentuates the vibration.
    >> >
    >> >You can see the one I'm talking about here:
    >> >http://www.3rd-eye.com/welcome.html. Even though they show it on a

    >straight
    >> >bar, it works fine on drop bars too. I monitor traffic with it and if

    >the
    >> >road is straight, I can even make left-hand turns without turning around
    >> >(but I don't recommend it).
    >> >
    >> >Ride on, behind aware,
    >> >Don
    >> >

    >> The Zefal round mirror with right-angle arm portion of mount removed
    >> and mounted on the bar end doesn't vibrate at all.
    >>
    >> I purposely had my bike set up with bar-end shifter for rear and down
    >> tube shifter for front derailleur to accomodate the Zefal.
    >>
    >> Trouble is, Don does not want a bar-end mount mirror.
    >> Dave
    >>

    >Don's got a bar end mirror. Reid might benefit from looking beyond his
    >preconceptions unless he is so far forward that he'd have to look back
    >instead of glancing down to see an effective bar end mirror.
    >Bill Brannon

    My mistake, meant Reid.
     
  20. Chalo

    Chalo Guest

    "GaryG" <[email protected]_SPAMBEGONE_software.com> wrote:
    >
    > "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote
    > > :: http://users.rcn.com/icebike/Equipment/cyclingmirrors.htm
    > > ::
    > > :: http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/Extras/product_86204.shtml
    > >
    > >
    > > Do you have the long or short version?
    > >

    >
    > I have the long version. I might try the short version at some point, but I
    > suspect that my 50-something eyes would not be able to focus it well.


    You're not focusing on the mirror, but the objects reflected in it.
    Putting the mirror closer to your eye is better because it means a
    smaller mirror gives you a wider field of view without demagnifying
    effects.

    > FWIW, I tried one of those tiny, stick-on-inside-the-glasses-lens mirrors a
    > couple of years back, and found it completely worthless due to the focus
    > issue.


    You must wear eye correction then. The problem is not the mirror's
    proximity to your eye, but the fact that the image in it is
    uncorrected, being placed before the correcting lens.

    Chalo Colina
     
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