Finding a mirror that is not a piece of crap...

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Reid Priedhorsky, Sep 2, 2004.

  1. On Fri, 03 Sep 2004 23:03:51 +0000, Bill wrote:
    >
    > Reid might benefit from looking beyond his preconceptions unless he is
    > so far forward that he'd have to look back instead of glancing down to
    > see an effective bar end mirror.


    I did try a bar-end mirror, possibly the Third Eye that's been
    recommended. The reason I want it up by the brake levers is because a
    mirror in that position requires only a quick glance -- eye movement only,
    no head movement, which the bar-end needed. Other than that, the bar-end
    was much nicer in terms of vibration and sturdiness.

    I'm thinking of perhaps hacking up some old handlebars and attaching them
    to the real bars via pipe clamps or something (properly protected against
    scratching, to prevent stress risers) so I can position a bar-end where I
    want. Or perhaps some other widgetry. If I do this I'll post pics.

    Other posters have recommended head-mounted mirrors, which I've also tried
    and found very disorienting... apparently one can get over this, but also
    I couldn't find a position where I could see behind without head movement.

    My main feeling is, the position by the brake hood says "Yes Yes Yes" to
    me and I'm just frustrated that I can't seem to find such a mirror that
    doesn't suck.

    Thanks for the ongoing help, everyone.

    Reid
     


  2. Emily

    Emily Guest

    "Rich Clark" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I've used a Take-A-Look for years, swear by it; using it is so natural to

    me
    > it's like part of my head. I miss it when I'm walking down the street.


    I'm with you Rich. The Take-A-Look is a wonderful mirror. It was
    recommended to me by several folks in my bike club last summer, and now that
    I have one, I recommend it to anyone who will listen. It doesn't vibrate at
    all, stays put, and provides a great rear view. I never have to turn my
    head, and there is truly no blind spot. I ride 4000 or so miles per year
    and would not feel safe without my Take-A-Look.

    I miss mine when hiking in the woods! ;-)

    Emily
     
  3. GaryG

    GaryG Guest

    "Chalo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "GaryG" <[email protected]_SPAMBEGONE_software.com> wrote:
    > >
    > > "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote
    > > > :: http://users.rcn.com/icebike/Equipment/cyclingmirrors.htm
    > > > ::
    > > > :: http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/Extras/product_86204.shtml
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > Do you have the long or short version?
    > > >

    > >
    > > I have the long version. I might try the short version at some point,

    but I
    > > suspect that my 50-something eyes would not be able to focus it well.

    >
    > You're not focusing on the mirror, but the objects reflected in it.
    > Putting the mirror closer to your eye is better because it means a
    > smaller mirror gives you a wider field of view without demagnifying
    > effects.
    >
    > > FWIW, I tried one of those tiny, stick-on-inside-the-glasses-lens

    mirrors a
    > > couple of years back, and found it completely worthless due to the focus
    > > issue.

    >
    > You must wear eye correction then. The problem is not the mirror's
    > proximity to your eye, but the fact that the image in it is
    > uncorrected, being placed before the correcting lens.


    Nope...I've had LASIK and my eyes are 20-20. I just did an experiment
    holding a mirror within a few inches of my face. It's much easier seeing
    things in the mirror with my reading glasses than without.

    GG

    > Chalo Colina
     
  4. GaryG wrote:

    > "Chalo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>
    >>You must wear eye correction then. The problem is not the mirror's
    >>proximity to your eye, but the fact that the image in it is
    >>uncorrected, being placed before the correcting lens.

    >
    >
    > Nope...I've had LASIK and my eyes are 20-20. I just did an experiment
    > holding a mirror within a few inches of my face. It's much easier seeing
    > things in the mirror with my reading glasses than without.


    ???

    Are you talking about _distant_ things, seen through a flat mirror? If
    so, this is one of those times that someone's description of events
    indicates a physical impossibility.

    If you look at the mirror itself - say, scratches or dust on its surface
    - your eyes will have to focus close. But if you're looking "through"
    the mirror at objects reflected in it, you focus at a distance equal to
    the distance the light waves travel.

    --
    --------------------+
    Frank Krygowski [To reply, remove rodent and vegetable dot com,
    replace with cc.ysu dot edu]
     
  5. Emily wrote:

    >
    >
    > I miss mine when hiking in the woods! ;-)


    My homemade eyeglass mirror has proven very useful kayaking with friends.

    --
    --------------------+
    Frank Krygowski [To reply, remove rodent and vegetable dot com,
    replace with cc.ysu dot edu]
     
  6. Reid Priedhorsky wrote:

    >
    > Other posters have recommended head-mounted mirrors, which I've also tried
    > and found very disorienting... apparently one can get over this, but also
    > I couldn't find a position where I could see behind without head movement.


    Mine does require head movement, but it's very natural. I've got it set
    so it takes about the same head movement as I use when checking my car's
    side view mirror. The reflexes transfer perfectly.

    BTW, one advantage relates to the mirror length issue mentioned earlier.
    If I do turn my head just a bit (maybe 15 degrees) it causes the
    mirror to move leftward enough to clear my shoulder, or a jacket hood,
    etc. It also keeps the mirror within the viewing area of my glasses -
    right at the top left corner of the field of view.

    Hmm. Maybe that's why some people have trouble using an eyeglass
    mirror. Maybe they try to set it up so no head motion is necessary.
    That may be a bad idea.


    --
    --------------------+
    Frank Krygowski [To reply, remove rodent and vegetable dot com,
    replace with cc.ysu dot edu]
     
  7. Rich Clark

    Rich Clark Guest

    "Reid Priedhorsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > Other posters have recommended head-mounted mirrors, which I've also tried
    > and found very disorienting... apparently one can get over this, but also
    > I couldn't find a position where I could see behind without head movement.


    Of course it requires head movement. What rear-view mirror doesn't? Do you
    stare at your brake hood the entire time you're riding? Do you stare
    continuously at the mirror on the door of your car?

    In all cases, the mirror (whether it's on the doors or ceiling of your car,
    on your handlebar, or on your helmet or your glasses) is occupying a point
    in space, and you have to train yourself to look at that point to see the
    reflection of the object you want to view.

    With a head-mounted mirror you happen to be moving the mirror into its
    required position while you simultaneously look at that point in space, so
    the training includes the head movement. It takes a couple of days, maybe
    more, but it *does* become automatic, and once it does the head-mounted
    mirror offers a much larger and easier-to-resolve field of view than
    bar-mounted mirrors do. Among other benefits, the head-mounted mirror lets
    you scan for things that are behind you to the right as well as to the left;
    with most bike-mounted mirrors your body blocks this view.

    Head-mount mirrors do require a period of training and adjustment, no
    argument. The benefits are worth it.

    RichC
     
  8. Neil Cherry

    Neil Cherry Guest

    On Fri, 03 Sep 2004 22:31:33 -0400, Frank Krygowski wrote:
    > Reid Priedhorsky wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Other posters have recommended head-mounted mirrors, which I've also tried
    >> and found very disorienting... apparently one can get over this, but also
    >> I couldn't find a position where I could see behind without head movement.

    >
    > Mine does require head movement, but it's very natural. I've got it set
    > so it takes about the same head movement as I use when checking my car's
    > side view mirror. The reflexes transfer perfectly.


    I'm one of those folks who can't use a mirror on my head or glasses
    because I can't seem to focus on the mirror without a lot of pain. So
    I gave up on them. I do use a mirror which fits over the left hood of
    my STI. I've broken one mirror but found another (on the road a day or
    2 later, wow :). I've saved the parts and if I break another I'll
    take it to a local glass shop and see if they can make a new mirror. I
    think it was a mirror made by Rhodes. I'm one of the few who has no
    problem with a mirror on my STI. I've had it for 15 years. Makes me
    look like a Fred but I don't care.

    --
    Linux Home Automation Neil Cherry [email protected]
    http://home.comcast.net/~ncherry/ (Text only)
    http://linuxha.sourceforge.net/ (SourceForge)
    http://hcs.sourceforge.net/ (HCS II)
     
  9. cheg

    cheg Guest

    "Reid Priedhorsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > On Fri, 03 Sep 2004 23:03:51 +0000, Bill wrote:
    > >

    > I'm thinking of perhaps hacking up some old handlebars and attaching them
    > to the real bars via pipe clamps or something (properly protected against
    > scratching, to prevent stress risers) so I can position a bar-end where I
    > want. Or perhaps some other widgetry. If I do this I'll post pics.
    >


    You could try a Minorua Space Grip for a clamp-on adjustable mount, though it
    might not be rigid enough with the weight of a mirror on it. Have you thought
    about kluging up a brace to stiffen one of the available hood mirrors? I used to
    use a Rhode Gear mirror when I had barend shifters and it seemed that a lot of
    the motion was at the flex joint. I thought about attaching a piece of aluminum
    to the back to stiffen the mirror but switched to cowhorn bars before I got
    around to trying it,
     
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