finding a Seat that agrees with my perineum

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by rastakaram, Oct 20, 2004.

  1. rastakaram

    rastakaram New Member

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    I recently started cycling, and my Trek 1500 came with a Trek CRZ saddle. When I ride I have no problems with my butt hurting, but my perineum kills me.
    I want a new saddle that will not chafe the bottom of my scrotum.
    I also want a saddle that is light weight. Can the two really go together, or can beggars not be chosers?
    I've seen pictures online of the San Marco Aero, which has a cut out in the middle, meant to help with this type of problem. BUT, I this saddle is heavier than other San Marco saddles.
    The San Marco ASPIDE, which seems to have a significant groove and is supposedly an "all day" saddle, is in the weight range that I want. But do you think it will help me with my problem?
    Any info on this Saddle or recommendations of others would help greatly...

    THANKS,
    Rasta
     
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  2. ed073

    ed073 New Member

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  3. Julian Radowsky

    Julian Radowsky New Member

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    I recently switched from a Selle Italia SLR Trans Am saddle (which at the time was the most comfortable saddle I had ever used) to a Selle San Marco Aspide FX saddle (got one as a gift).

    The Aspide FX saddle totally blows the SLR away in terms of comfort and positioning (especially noticible on 2hr+ rides).

    The SLR was not uncomfortable in the perineal area (no numbness or pain at all), but the actual seat area of the saddle flares out slightly wider and more rapidly than the Aspide, this wider flaring would eventually make its presence felt by digging into the bottom of my glutes, and became really painful after two hours. The Aspide does not dig into the bottom of my glutes at all.

    Remember, saddles are very personal, what works for my butt might not work for you.
     
  4. 62vette

    62vette Well-Known Member

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    I noticed in a local shop recently the new Specialized saddles come in different widths that could be a good thing to check out. Also with a cutaway. They have a thing in the store to measure the width of your bum bones.

    Can you imagine anyone other than a cyclist going to a store and getting their butt measured? Keep your minds out of the gutter :)
     
  5. 62vette

    62vette Well-Known Member

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    Oh and I second the chamois cream thing. Make sure your shorts are not loose too.
     
  6. rule62

    rule62 New Member

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    I have had really good luck with the Specialized Body Geometry saddles. I ride an 04 Milano on my trainer, and an 05 Avatart Gel and 05 Alias on the road. The 05 saddles are sized, which really helps with fit. And although the V groove and window don't work for everybody, it definitely works for my nut sack.
     
  7. Big Daddy

    Big Daddy New Member

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    Saddles are very personel

    But having tried a few my vote is for the Selle Italia Pro Link Gel.

    I have ridden with the Pro Link Trans Am (same saddle but with the cut out) and found thet the cut out was more painful than the non cut out version as the edge arround the cut out was noticable.

    I also suggest a Chamois cream I even use vaseline in a pinch and it works great in reducing friction in this most sensitive of areas
     
  8. darrenf

    darrenf New Member

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    I had the same problem with the old perinium area and have now solved it with a variety of adjustments (and new saddle):-

    1. raise handlebars. I had a 10cm height difference between top of saddle and top of handlebar (saddle higher). This is now around 7cm and this made an immediate difference as it transferred weight away from the perinium area to my fleshier ass as I am no longer leaning as far forward.

    2. ensure tip of saddle is slightly higher than centre of saddle. If this is not the case, you can slip forward on to the narrow area of the saddle which has no support.

    3. I bought a selle italia flite genuine gel saddle which has a wider back than my old saddle (which was quite rounded and narrow). Again, this gives more support and keeps the weight off where it shouldn't be. I think this is more to do with the wider/squarer rear of the saddle rather then the gel though.

    Good luck
     
  9. nssane

    nssane New Member

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    Same prblem with the stock seat on my Trek 2300. Bought a Selle San Marco Arami Gelaround and...OMG. Love it. Problem solved.

    Good Luck
     
  10. RC2

    RC2 New Member

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  11. OCRoadie

    OCRoadie New Member

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    Unfortunately, finding the right saddle for your body can be an expensive trial & error process. Personally, I had similar problems and have found the Fizik Arione saddle to be the best so far. Specialized had the new Alias saddle that comes in 3 sizes to help you fit better. Keep in mind that for a high end saddle that will stay comfortable over long hours you will probably be spending $100 - $200. Also, if you are new to cycling, keep in mind that much of the pain and discomfort decreases as you put your time in.
     
  12. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    Agree it takes time and miles to get used to riding in general. Most any saddle is going to feel uncomfortable to a new rider. Just keep the rides short, stand up often, and use chamois butter...comfort will improve over time as you put on miles.

    Also I'd say beginners in general should stay away from narrow, minimal race saddles like the SSM Aspide, unless they are small-framed lightweights. Saving a few grams doesn't mean a thing compared to comfort....you're not going to continue riding if your saddle is torturing you.
     
  13. RC2

    RC2 New Member

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    Another fizik arione lover here...mmm mmm... it's by far the best saddle I've used. So comfortable while not being bulky or heavy. Spendy though. But yes, saddles are a personal thing, you may hate it.
     
  14. RWillieK

    RWillieK New Member

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    Having recently started back into the sport, I bought an older Trek with a racing seat. The seat was comfortable, but my sit bones definatly hurt.

    I spotted a seat at Walmart thats made by Schwinn for $16....pretty comfy. My brother has the same seat in leather and he loves his too.......can't beat it for $16!

    Robbie
     
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