Finding Riding A Recumbent Trike Rather Cold

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Connie858, Mar 20, 2015.

  1. Connie858

    Connie858 New Member

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    I'm new to recumbents and have had to purchase a recumbent trike due to health reasons.

    I'm finding that I seem to be a lot colder riding the recumbent trike than I thought I used to be on any of my DF bikes. Is it just because I can't put as much effort in any more? I'm currently a lot slower than I used to be, but I know a lot of that is to do with 5 months in bed, and some of the on going health issues, but overall I seem to be having to wear a lot more than I was expecting to despite the 18lb in weight I have put on... :eek:
     
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  2. blazingpedals

    blazingpedals New Member

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    I've always found that I'm warmer on a bent. If you find you need more protection, you can always get a fairing.
     
  3. sylvia_louise

    sylvia_louise New Member

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    I am wondering, if you are colder because you are closer to the ground? Hmm. I don't know, just a thought because I have no experience to compare. I do know when I go out on colder mornings, I layer my clothes, wear a scarf, and put on some gloves. Then, as I heat up, I remove some of the layers. I can not stand in when I am in a wind tunnel! Brr.
     
  4. joshposh

    joshposh Banned

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    Closer to the ground or your body is at a relaxer state cause you got a softer seat to ride in. Therefore you aren't using as much upper body motion to heat up. Just a thought. It's a sound theory. If you aren't moving much, then you get cold.
     
  5. DancingLady

    DancingLady Member

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    There are probably several factors here. First of all, the recumbent position likely does not promote engaging your core nearly as much as a typical bicycle does, so you are not working as many muscle groups at the same time to the same extent. I personally find that engaging my core warms me up faster than anything.

    Second, you may have lost quite a bit of muscle due to your illness and not being able to move around. Muscle is what generates heat. As you recover and exercise more and more, your muscles will rebuild and you will be able to warm up more quickly.
     
  6. adfnio

    adfnio New Member

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    I agree with the both of you. Lower riding, and less core strength usage equals to less body heat and used energy.
     
  7. blazingpedals

    blazingpedals New Member

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    Hopefully your cold-weather symptoms have gotten better as the season has progressed. If I may make a few observations.
    1. You've been inactive for months. Along with muscle loss, you probably have lost aerobic fitness. Getting the ticker going will make a big difference in how warm you are. Getting your heart rate up is the key, not which muscles are doing the work.
    2. Recumbent riders tend to notice their bladders more in cold weather. It's positional, but the effect is real.
    3. On an upright, the air forms a pocket of high pressure in your lap, forcing the cold through your jacket. On a recumbent, it tends to flow past you. You still get wind chill, but the chill doesn't penetrate as much. I tend to need one less layer compared to my upright-riding friends.
    4. As with any bike, if your hands and feet are cold, the rest of you will be cold. That's where fairings help. Consider catalytic toe warmers in cold weather.

    In the summer, heat becomes more of an issue. On a hot sunny day, riding six inches off the hot pavement can be sweltering. Drink lots of water, keep moving so you get air flow, and when you stop - stop in the shade.
     
  8. BikeBikeBikeBike

    BikeBikeBikeBike Well-Known Member

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    I find the less I am working the less I heat up. I jump on the recumbent at the gym from time to time and it's a little more relaxed, I don't sweat as much. I suppose this could be one factor, there are probably more I think a poster above was on to something with the closer to the ground too.
     
  9. JoanMcWench

    JoanMcWench Member

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    I think blood flow has a lot to do with it as well as being closer to the ground. The wind blowing toward you is off the ground so is usually colder. In short, I agree with most posts above. I think if you give it time & make it a point to set goals you'll be back to a warmer place. The cool air down there might be a positive of your ride. :p
     
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