FIR Rims?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Bow, Jul 7, 2004.

  1. Bow

    Bow Guest

    Has anyone had any experience with FIR rims? The model I am looking at
    buying is the SRG 30 aero profile 28 spoke.

    Thanks

    Bow
     
    Tags:


  2. Peter Vesel

    Peter Vesel Guest

    "Bow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:sx5Hc.18501$%[email protected]
    > Has anyone had any experience with FIR rims? The model I am looking at
    > buying is the SRG 30 aero profile 28 spoke.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Bow
    >

    I had a pair made up a couple of years back(32 spoke bright gold finish).
    I experienced cracking around all the rear drive side spokes so took the
    wheel back and had the rim replaced for free.
    A couple of weeks later I hit a pothole and destroyed the new rim.
    I don't use the rear wheel now and the front wheel, which is fine, is in the
    garage. (would you like to buy it?;))

    Personally I don't think the rim is any better or worse than Australian made
    velocity deep V rims, which you should be able to find cheaper.

    Peter
     
  3. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Thu, 8 Jul 2004 16:07:12 +1000, "Bow" <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    >Has anyone had any experience with FIR rims? The model I am looking at
    >buying is the SRG 30 aero profile 28 spoke.


    MAPLE or SPRUCE may be stronger.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  4. MikeYankee

    MikeYankee Guest

    No info on that specific model, but I've build and ridden many wheels based on
    FIR EA-60 and EA-65 rims, which are similar to Mavic's Open Pro. One of 'em is
    a 24-spoke front wheel laced on a 36-hole rim (I weigh 175 lb).

    I consider these rims rugged and reliable. One of my EA-60 wheelsets has 23k
    miles and is still going strong except for [normal] wear on the braking
    surfaces.

    OTOH, I bought a used bike with FIR Nettuno cheap aero rims (1997 or
    thereabouts). They had small cracks around the nipple sockets (no eyelets). I
    thought they were crap.



    Mike Yankee

    (Address is munged to thwart spammers.
    To reply, delete everything after "com".)
     
  5. Chris

    Chris Guest

    "Peter Vesel" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:eek:[email protected]
    >
    > "Bow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:sx5Hc.18501$%[email protected]
    > > Has anyone had any experience with FIR rims? The model I am looking at
    > > buying is the SRG 30 aero profile 28 spoke.
    > >
    > > Thanks
    > >
    > > Bow
    > >

    > I had a pair made up a couple of years back(32 spoke bright gold finish).
    > I experienced cracking around all the rear drive side spokes so took the
    > wheel back and had the rim replaced for free.
    > A couple of weeks later I hit a pothole and destroyed the new rim.
    > I don't use the rear wheel now and the front wheel, which is fine, is in

    the
    > garage. (would you like to buy it?;))
    >
    > Personally I don't think the rim is any better or worse than Australian

    made
    > velocity deep V rims, which you should be able to find cheaper.


    And drilled any way you can think of.

    >
    > Peter
    >
    >
     
  6. Karl

    Karl Guest

    "Bow" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<sx5Hc.18501$%[email protected]>...
    > Has anyone had any experience with FIR rims? The model I am looking at
    > buying is the SRG 30 aero profile 28 spoke.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Bow


    I've used FIR on road and off over the years and have always had good
    luck with them.
    Karl
     
  7. ZeeExSixAre

    ZeeExSixAre Guest

    Bow wrote:
    > Has anyone had any experience with FIR rims?


    They used to have those before they started using metal... the younger
    generation here will remember "Oregon Trail" and all the broken yokes,
    tongues, axles, and wheels... wood (and thus, FIR) just wasn't reliable!
    Can't imagine why you'd put one on a bike in this day and age...

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training (where's Sorni when you need him?)
     
  8. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Thu, 8 Jul 2004 17:57:24 -0400, "ZeeExSixAre"
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >They used to have those before they started using metal... the younger
    >generation here will remember "Oregon Trail" and all the broken yokes,
    >tongues, axles, and wheels... wood (and thus, FIR) just wasn't reliable!


    Played it on an Apple IIe. Later bought it for Apple IIgs and PC,
    and still have the DOS version around somewhere (probably on 5.25"
    disks).

    >Can't imagine why you'd put one on a bike in this day and age...


    Me neither. Kiln-dried spruce is stronger.

    >Phil, Squid-in-Training (where's Sorni when you need him?)


    Boycotting this thread?
    --
    Rick "Sore-knee from changing fir wheel" Onanian
     
  9. S o r n i

    S o r n i Guest

    Rick Onanian wrote:
    > On Thu, 8 Jul 2004 17:57:24 -0400, "ZeeExSixAre"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> They used to have those before they started using metal... the
    >> younger generation here will remember "Oregon Trail" and all the
    >> broken yokes, tongues, axles, and wheels... wood (and thus, FIR)
    >> just wasn't reliable!

    >
    > Played it on an Apple IIe. Later bought it for Apple IIgs and PC,
    > and still have the DOS version around somewhere (probably on 5.25"
    > disks).
    >
    >> Can't imagine why you'd put one on a bike in this day and age...

    >
    > Me neither. Kiln-dried spruce is stronger.
    >
    >> Phil, Squid-in-Training (where's Sorni when you need him?)

    >
    > Boycotting this thread?


    My mouse finger was itchy, and now I know why! (Didn't notice my name first
    time, as newsreader sorta "dims" sigs and the Squid's remark was thus
    treated...uh, thusly.)

    Bill "FIR rims: soft ride, but the protesters throwing buckets of blood on
    you gets rather old" S.
     
  10. DRS

    DRS Guest

  11. S o r n i

    S o r n i Guest

  12. bfd

    bfd Guest

  13. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Rick Onanian wrote:

    > On Thu, 8 Jul 2004 16:07:12 +1000, "Bow" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Has anyone had any experience with FIR rims? The model I am looking at
    >>buying is the SRG 30 aero profile 28 spoke.

    >
    >
    > MAPLE or SPRUCE may be stronger.


    How wood you know?

    --
    Tom Sherman – Quad City Area
     
  14. S o r n i

    S o r n i Guest

    Tom Sherman wrote:
    > Rick Onanian wrote:


    >> MAPLE or SPRUCE may be stronger.

    >
    > How wood you know?


    That should finish this.

    Bill "going against the grain" S.
     
  15. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Sat, 10 Jul 2004 22:30:51 -0500, Tom Sherman
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> MAPLE or SPRUCE may be stronger.

    >
    >How wood you know?


    I'm in the construction business, so I mite (is that the best I can
    come up with?) know this sort of stuff.

    Er, seriously, engineers insist that kiln dried spruce is stronger,
    but it sure is brittle. IME, hem fir has proven itself to be much
    tougher, and I've yet to load KD spruce in any direction where it's
    stronger than hem fir.

    I hope you aren't board (hah! better...) of my lumbering (woo hoo!)
    prose.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  16. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Rick Onanian wrote:

    > On Sat, 10 Jul 2004 22:30:51 -0500, Tom Sherman
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>>MAPLE or SPRUCE may be stronger.

    >>
    >>How wood you know?

    >
    >
    > I'm in the construction business, so I mite (is that the best I can
    > come up with?) know this sort of stuff.
    >
    > Er, seriously, engineers insist that kiln dried spruce is stronger,
    > but it sure is brittle....


    Loaded longitudinally, tangentially, or radial to the grain?

    --
    Tom Sherman – Quad City Area
     
  17. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Mon, 12 Jul 2004 19:51:23 -0500, Tom Sherman
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Er, seriously, engineers insist that kiln dried spruce is stronger,
    >> but it sure is brittle....

    >
    >Loaded longitudinally, tangentially, or radial to the grain?


    In my experience, all of the above, in compression, stretch, span,
    beam, whatever types of loads. I've just not had a real-world
    experience where KD spruce has survived more load than hem fir.

    All combinations of the above loads do happen, between cutting,
    nailing, screwing, loading, removing, breaking, and all the other
    things you do with wood. I've used both species as parts of walls,
    staging, makeshift tools, pavement protection under heavy/sharp
    stuff, tables, and as ultra-rough-service boxes.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  18. Bow

    Bow Guest

    What have I started? I'm sorry I asked ;-)

    B

    "Rick Onanian" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Mon, 12 Jul 2004 19:51:23 -0500, Tom Sherman
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> Er, seriously, engineers insist that kiln dried spruce is stronger,
    > >> but it sure is brittle....

    > >
    > >Loaded longitudinally, tangentially, or radial to the grain?

    >
    > In my experience, all of the above, in compression, stretch, span,
    > beam, whatever types of loads. I've just not had a real-world
    > experience where KD spruce has survived more load than hem fir.
    >
    > All combinations of the above loads do happen, between cutting,
    > nailing, screwing, loading, removing, breaking, and all the other
    > things you do with wood. I've used both species as parts of walls,
    > staging, makeshift tools, pavement protection under heavy/sharp
    > stuff, tables, and as ultra-rough-service boxes.
    > --
    > Rick Onanian
     
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