"Firm up the handlebars"???

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Pete Biggs, Jan 21, 2005.

  1. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

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  2. M. Chandler

    M. Chandler Guest

  3. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    On Fri, 21 Jan 2005 18:02:02 -0000, "Pete Biggs"
    <pwrinkledgrape{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote:

    >http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=7129546972
    >
    >"Keen cyclists will know that this gadget is used to firm up the
    >handle-bars."
    >
    >I thought I was keen but I've never heard of anything like this. Is it
    >meant for repairs or what? Firming is nonsense, I guess.


    I wonder why they don't make bars with a piece of wood, plastic, or CF
    in the bar at the clamping area. When the bar failed, you'd get time
    to bring the bicycle safely to a stop. I am told that this is a trick
    that they used to do with steerer tubes when failures were not
    uncommon.
     
  4. like a shock tower to shock tower bar on the front end above the engine
    with engine mount type bushings or not.
    metal flexes! some auto designs shake and rattle up there under
    non-commute loads.
    consider the: on the seat, off the seat or one pedal down one up or
    best both even when cornering. The frame, a truss like a roof truss has
    + and - pressure areas that shift around in action. best loaded
    evenly at the bottom to reduce compressive loads squeezing down from
    the seat seated
    may not be noticeable BUTBUTBUT!

    add a gorilla or slide the volvo over a dirt road at 80
    and then metal parts then begin to flex noticeably.
     
  5. On Fri, 21 Jan 2005 18:02:02 -0000, "Pete Biggs"
    <pwrinkledgrape{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote:

    >http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=7129546972
    >
    >"Keen cyclists will know that this gadget is used to firm up the
    >handle-bars."
    >
    >I thought I was keen but I've never heard of anything like this. Is it
    >meant for repairs or what? Firming is nonsense, I guess.
    >
    >~PB


    Dear Pete,

    I doubt that the add-on brace helps short, flat, straight
    off-road bicycle handlebars.

    But handlebar braces are quite common in the off-road
    motorcycle world where handlebars are wider and their curve
    is quite different:

    With an add-on brace, this:
    ______ ________
    \ /
    \__c_c__/

    becomes this:

    ______ _______
    x----------x
    \__c__c__/

    and the flexing at the handlebar clamps "c" is greatly
    reduced, leading to much longer handlebar life.

    Carl Fogel
     
  6. MSA

    MSA Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > >I thought I was keen but I've never heard of anything like this. Is it
    > >meant for repairs or what? Firming is nonsense, I guess.

    >


    I remember these well Pete, from my Mountain bike days of the past.
    Wouldn't fancy putting them on the drops on my bike now though!
    --
    Mark (MSA)
    ______________________________________________
    Remember, half the people you know are below average
     
  7. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Fri, 21 Jan 2005 18:02:02 -0000, "Pete Biggs"
    <pwrinkledgrape{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> may have said:

    >http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=7129546972
    >
    >"Keen cyclists will know that this gadget is used to firm up the
    >handle-bars."
    >
    >I thought I was keen but I've never heard of anything like this. Is it
    >meant for repairs or what? Firming is nonsense, I guess.


    Trick-bike stuff used with long riser bars. I've seen a couple of
    them on freeride bikes. I've also seen a bike that was more of an art
    project which used two such crossbars to provide additional space to
    mount stuff. (Not sorry that I don't have pictures; think of it as a
    rolling testament to the color pink.)

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  8. Chalo

    Chalo Guest

    Pete Biggs wrote:
    > http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=7129546972
    >
    > "Keen cyclists will know that this gadget is used to firm up the
    > handle-bars."
    >
    > I thought I was keen but I've never heard of anything like this. Is

    it
    > meant for repairs or what? Firming is nonsense, I guess.


    No, it does what it's supposed to do. I have such devices on three of
    my bikes, and I have handlebars with welded crossbars on many others
    (at least six, but it's difficult to keep track).

    Handlebars flex around. The taller or wider they are, or the more
    force you apply, the more they flex. A crossbar allows one side to
    support the other, which greatly increases strength and rigidity-- much
    the same way that your bike is stiffer and stronger with a top tube
    than it would be without one.

    Chalo Colina
     
  9. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    M. Chandler wrote:
    > Pete Biggs wrote:
    >> http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=7129546972
    >>
    >> "Keen cyclists will know that this gadget is used to firm up the
    >> handle-bars."
    >>
    >> I thought I was keen but I've never heard of anything like this. Is
    >> it meant for repairs or what? Firming is nonsense, I guess.

    >
    > Looks like a bolt-on crossbard for (mtb) riser bars.


    Thanks Mark and everyone, that does make sense.

    Obviously I'm not a keen mountain biker :-$

    ~PB
     
  10. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > like a shock tower to shock tower bar on the front end above the engine
    > with engine mount type bushings or not.
    > metal flexes! some auto designs shake and rattle up there under
    > non-commute loads.
    > consider the: on the seat, off the seat or one pedal down one up or
    > best both even when cornering. The frame, a truss like a roof truss has
    > + and - pressure areas that shift around in action. best loaded
    > evenly at the bottom to reduce compressive loads squeezing down from
    > the seat seated
    > may not be noticeable BUTBUTBUT!
    >
    > add a gorilla or slide the volvo over a dirt road at 80
    > and then metal parts then begin to flex noticeably.


    The bike riding gorilla: <http://www.easyracers.com/images/ape1.jpg>. ;)

    --
    Tom Sherman - Near Rock Island
     
  11. meb

    meb New Member

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    I brought my gorilla suit to ride in the recumbent section of our Halloween parade. Since I arrived late for muster, I didn't change into my suit, but a bent tandem rider did have a gorilla suit.
     
  12. Jeff Starr

    Jeff Starr Guest

    On Fri, 21 Jan 2005 22:26:39 -0600, Tom Sherman
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >> add a gorilla or slide the volvo over a dirt road at 80
    >> and then metal parts then begin to flex noticeably.

    >
    >The bike riding gorilla: <http://www.easyracers.com/images/ape1.jpg>. ;)


    Oh, so that is what Chalo looks like, I always wondered;-)


    Life is Good!
    Jeff
     
  13. RonSonic

    RonSonic Guest

    On Fri, 21 Jan 2005 18:02:02 -0000, "Pete Biggs"
    <pwrinkledgrape{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote:

    >http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=7129546972
    >
    >"Keen cyclists will know that this gadget is used to firm up the
    >handle-bars."
    >
    >I thought I was keen but I've never heard of anything like this. Is it
    >meant for repairs or what? Firming is nonsense, I guess.


    What like we're not used to nonsense in cycling goods.

    I seem to recall these being used on BMX bikes back in the dark ages.

    Ron
     
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