first bench meet

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by [email protected], Mar 25, 2005.

  1. .... for a friend. I've never observed or participated in one either.
    I imagine IPA rules will apply. What kind of strategy should be used
    in selecting weights for the three attempts? He's going to try for a
    max of 375-380 - a weight he's never done without a slight spot from
    me at the bottom sticking point.
     
    Tags:


  2. <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > ... for a friend. I've never observed or participated in one either.
    > I imagine IPA rules will apply. What kind of strategy should be used
    > in selecting weights for the three attempts? He's going to try for a
    > max of 375-380 - a weight he's never done without a slight spot from
    > me at the bottom sticking point.


    http://www.usapowerlifting.com/newsletter/05/features/features.html

    Agrees with what I've heard. First attempt should be something you've
    tripled in the gym, second should be something you're still pretty sure
    of getting, often a slight PR if training and taper has been going well.

    -S-
    http://www.kbnj.com
     
  3. <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:eek:[email protected]
    > On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 13:58:15 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>http://www.usapowerlifting.com/newsletter/05/features/features.html
    >>
    >>Agrees with what I've heard. First attempt should be something you've
    >>tripled in the gym, second should be something you're still pretty
    >>sure
    >>of getting, often a slight PR if training and taper has been going
    >>well.

    >
    > Thanx Steve


    No problem. In the two meets I've done, it's the approach I've used and
    I went 8 for 9 both times so it seems about right to me.

    -S-
    http://www.kbnj.com
     
  4. On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 18:11:34 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    <stev[email protected]> wrote:

    ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:eek:[email protected]
    >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 13:58:15 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>http://www.usapowerlifting.com/newsletter/05/features/features.html
    >>>
    >>>Agrees with what I've heard. First attempt should be something you've
    >>>tripled in the gym, second should be something you're still pretty
    >>>sure
    >>>of getting, often a slight PR if training and taper has been going
    >>>well.

    >>
    >> Thanx Steve

    >
    >No problem. In the two meets I've done, it's the approach I've used and
    >I went 8 for 9 both times so it seems about right to me.
    >
    >-S-
    >http://www.kbnj.com


    What about spotters? The meets supply their own, right? One for each
    side of the bar?
     
  5. <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 18:11:34 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:eek:[email protected]
    >>> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 13:58:15 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>http://www.usapowerlifting.com/newsletter/05/features/features.html
    >>>>
    >>>>Agrees with what I've heard. First attempt should be something
    >>>>you've
    >>>>tripled in the gym, second should be something you're still pretty
    >>>>sure
    >>>>of getting, often a slight PR if training and taper has been going
    >>>>well.
    >>>
    >>> Thanx Steve

    >>
    >>No problem. In the two meets I've done, it's the approach I've used
    >>and
    >>I went 8 for 9 both times so it seems about right to me.
    >>
    >>-S-
    >>http://www.kbnj.com

    >
    > What about spotters? The meets supply their own, right? One for each
    > side of the bar?


    The meets I've been at have supplied more than enough spotters, but for
    bench, a lifter often prefers to supply his own person to take the
    center position for hand-off if that's possible.

    -S-
     
  6. On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 20:08:48 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 18:11:34 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>news:eek:[email protected]
    >>>> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 13:58:15 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    >>>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>http://www.usapowerlifting.com/newsletter/05/features/features.html
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Agrees with what I've heard. First attempt should be something
    >>>>>you've
    >>>>>tripled in the gym, second should be something you're still pretty
    >>>>>sure
    >>>>>of getting, often a slight PR if training and taper has been going
    >>>>>well.
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanx Steve
    >>>
    >>>No problem. In the two meets I've done, it's the approach I've used
    >>>and
    >>>I went 8 for 9 both times so it seems about right to me.
    >>>
    >>>-S-
    >>>http://www.kbnj.com

    >>
    >> What about spotters? The meets supply their own, right? One for each
    >> side of the bar?

    >
    >The meets I've been at have supplied more than enough spotters, but for
    >bench, a lifter often prefers to supply his own person to take the
    >center position for hand-off if that's possible.
    >
    >-S-


    Why is one person in the middle better than one at each end? I was
    spotting my friend today and he did worse with me spotting than by
    unracking it himself. If I'm not mistaken (but I could be), the meet
    requires spotters to unrack the bar and give it to the lifter at
    lockout. I know I can't do that by myself standing behind his head
    with a 380 lb bar.
     
  7. [email protected] wrote:
    <snip>

    > If I'm not mistaken (but I could be), the meet
    > requires spotters to unrack the bar and give it to the lifter at
    > lockout. I know I can't do that by myself standing behind his head
    > with a 380 lb bar.


    lol no you wouldn't want to try that i don't think...
     
  8. Hobbes

    Hobbes Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 20:08:48 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]
    > >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 18:11:34 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    > >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>><[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >>>news:eek:[email protected]
    > >>>> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 13:58:15 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    > >>>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>>>
    > >>>>>http://www.usapowerlifting.com/newsletter/05/features/features.html
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>>Agrees with what I've heard. First attempt should be something
    > >>>>>you've
    > >>>>>tripled in the gym, second should be something you're still pretty
    > >>>>>sure
    > >>>>>of getting, often a slight PR if training and taper has been going
    > >>>>>well.
    > >>>>
    > >>>> Thanx Steve
    > >>>
    > >>>No problem. In the two meets I've done, it's the approach I've used
    > >>>and
    > >>>I went 8 for 9 both times so it seems about right to me.
    > >>>
    > >>>-S-
    > >>>http://www.kbnj.com
    > >>
    > >> What about spotters? The meets supply their own, right? One for each
    > >> side of the bar?

    > >
    > >The meets I've been at have supplied more than enough spotters, but for
    > >bench, a lifter often prefers to supply his own person to take the
    > >center position for hand-off if that's possible.
    > >
    > >-S-

    >
    > Why is one person in the middle better than one at each end? I was
    > spotting my friend today and he did worse with me spotting than by
    > unracking it himself. If I'm not mistaken (but I could be), the meet
    > requires spotters to unrack the bar and give it to the lifter at
    > lockout. I know I can't do that by myself standing behind his head
    > with a 380 lb bar.


    I've done a few world meets and actually been requested to give the hand
    off by some lifters attempting records. (At CPU/IPF meets you can't have
    your own guy do the hand off.)

    I've been told it makes a difference. I've also done hand offs for lifters
    doing over 600 lbs. You don't have to take all the weight, obviously.

    What I try and do is get the bar to the perfect position for the lifter -
    normally out over their chest - and then let the bar go in such a way that
    it feels light for the lifter. So I take as much weight off as I can, get
    the bar to where the lifter wants it, and then let the remainder of the
    weight drop onto the lifter gradually - I don't just 'plonk' the bar onto
    them.

    It can depend on the lifter, but with a 400 or so bench I felt the hand
    off could be worth 10-15 lbs for me.

    --
    Keith
     
  9. On 26 Mar 2005 18:49:19 -0800, [email protected] wrote:

    >
    >[email protected] wrote:
    ><snip>
    >
    >> If I'm not mistaken (but I could be), the meet
    >> requires spotters to unrack the bar and give it to the lifter at
    >> lockout. I know I can't do that by myself standing behind his head
    >> with a 380 lb bar.

    >
    >lol no you wouldn't want to try that i don't think...


    No way!

    As I said, my training partner was far more successful unracking the
    bar himself than having me assist him in unracking it.
    He thought it might be helpful to have me assist to get him used to
    the feeling of being handed the bar. I'm not sure I agree. I imagine
    being handed the bar in a lockout feels very different than being
    given a small assist in unracking it. But I don't know anything about
    all this. I don't bench and I've never observed a meet.
     
  10. On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 22:49:12 -0600, [email protected] (Hobbes)
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    >[email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 20:08:48 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >news:[email protected]
    >> >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 18:11:34 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    >> >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >>><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >>>news:eek:[email protected]
    >> >>>> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 13:58:15 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    >> >>>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >>>>
    >> >>>>>http://www.usapowerlifting.com/newsletter/05/features/features.html
    >> >>>>>
    >> >>>>>Agrees with what I've heard. First attempt should be something
    >> >>>>>you've
    >> >>>>>tripled in the gym, second should be something you're still pretty
    >> >>>>>sure
    >> >>>>>of getting, often a slight PR if training and taper has been going
    >> >>>>>well.
    >> >>>>
    >> >>>> Thanx Steve
    >> >>>
    >> >>>No problem. In the two meets I've done, it's the approach I've used
    >> >>>and
    >> >>>I went 8 for 9 both times so it seems about right to me.
    >> >>>
    >> >>>-S-
    >> >>>http://www.kbnj.com
    >> >>
    >> >> What about spotters? The meets supply their own, right? One for each
    >> >> side of the bar?
    >> >
    >> >The meets I've been at have supplied more than enough spotters, but for
    >> >bench, a lifter often prefers to supply his own person to take the
    >> >center position for hand-off if that's possible.
    >> >
    >> >-S-

    >>
    >> Why is one person in the middle better than one at each end? I was
    >> spotting my friend today and he did worse with me spotting than by
    >> unracking it himself. If I'm not mistaken (but I could be), the meet
    >> requires spotters to unrack the bar and give it to the lifter at
    >> lockout. I know I can't do that by myself standing behind his head
    >> with a 380 lb bar.

    >
    >I've done a few world meets and actually been requested to give the hand
    >off by some lifters attempting records. (At CPU/IPF meets you can't have
    >your own guy do the hand off.)
    >
    >I've been told it makes a difference. I've also done hand offs for lifters
    >doing over 600 lbs. You don't have to take all the weight, obviously.
    >
    >What I try and do is get the bar to the perfect position for the lifter -
    >normally out over their chest - and then let the bar go in such a way that
    >it feels light for the lifter. So I take as much weight off as I can, get
    >the bar to where the lifter wants it, and then let the remainder of the
    >weight drop onto the lifter gradually - I don't just 'plonk' the bar onto
    >them.
    >
    >It can depend on the lifter, but with a 400 or so bench I felt the hand
    >off could be worth 10-15 lbs for me.


    Interesting Keith. You feel one guy in the middle can be better than
    one guy at each end?

    What are the critical stats/factors for one guy doing a hand off to
    someone benching 380? Should the spotter be able to DL and/or Good
    Morning a certain amount? My training partner uses the top pin on the
    bench. I'm 5'10" Should I be standing on an elevated platform?
    (I was.) If so, how high should the platform be? Exactly how are you
    positioned to help get the bar over the lifter's chest and then
    gradually release the remainder of the weight onto the lifter?
     
  11. John Hanson

    John Hanson Guest

    On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 22:49:12 -0600, [email protected] (Hobbes) wrote
    in misc.fitness.weights:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    >[email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 20:08:48 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >news:[email protected]
    >> >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 18:11:34 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    >> >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >>><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >>>news:eek:[email protected]
    >> >>>> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 13:58:15 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    >> >>>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >>>>
    >> >>>>>http://www.usapowerlifting.com/newsletter/05/features/features.html
    >> >>>>>
    >> >>>>>Agrees with what I've heard. First attempt should be something
    >> >>>>>you've
    >> >>>>>tripled in the gym, second should be something you're still pretty
    >> >>>>>sure
    >> >>>>>of getting, often a slight PR if training and taper has been going
    >> >>>>>well.
    >> >>>>
    >> >>>> Thanx Steve
    >> >>>
    >> >>>No problem. In the two meets I've done, it's the approach I've used
    >> >>>and
    >> >>>I went 8 for 9 both times so it seems about right to me.
    >> >>>
    >> >>>-S-
    >> >>>http://www.kbnj.com
    >> >>
    >> >> What about spotters? The meets supply their own, right? One for each
    >> >> side of the bar?
    >> >
    >> >The meets I've been at have supplied more than enough spotters, but for
    >> >bench, a lifter often prefers to supply his own person to take the
    >> >center position for hand-off if that's possible.
    >> >
    >> >-S-

    >>
    >> Why is one person in the middle better than one at each end? I was
    >> spotting my friend today and he did worse with me spotting than by
    >> unracking it himself. If I'm not mistaken (but I could be), the meet
    >> requires spotters to unrack the bar and give it to the lifter at
    >> lockout. I know I can't do that by myself standing behind his head
    >> with a 380 lb bar.

    >
    >I've done a few world meets and actually been requested to give the hand
    >off by some lifters attempting records. (At CPU/IPF meets you can't have
    >your own guy do the hand off.)


    At USAPL national meets, they have a hand off guy and you can't use
    your own. At least that is what I have observed but I've never seen
    anything about it in the rules. The guy who handed off to me at
    Masters Nationals last year gave me the best hand offs ever. Any
    other USAPL meet, you can have your own guy.

    >
    >I've been told it makes a difference. I've also done hand offs for lifters
    >doing over 600 lbs. You don't have to take all the weight, obviously.
    >
    >What I try and do is get the bar to the perfect position for the lifter -
    >normally out over their chest - and then let the bar go in such a way that
    >it feels light for the lifter. So I take as much weight off as I can, get
    >the bar to where the lifter wants it, and then let the remainder of the
    >weight drop onto the lifter gradually - I don't just 'plonk' the bar onto
    >them.
    >
    >It can depend on the lifter, but with a 400 or so bench I felt the hand
    >off could be worth 10-15 lbs for me.
     
  12. Hobbes

    Hobbes Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    da[email protected] wrote:

    > On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 22:49:12 -0600, [email protected] (Hobbes)
    > wrote:
    >
    > >In article <[email protected]>,
    > >[email protected] wrote:
    > >
    > >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 20:08:48 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    > >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> >news:[email protected]
    > >> >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 18:11:34 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    > >> >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> >>
    > >> >>><[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> >>>news:eek:[email protected]
    > >> >>>> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 13:58:15 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    > >> >>>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> >>>>
    > >> >>>>>http://www.usapowerlifting.com/newsletter/05/features/features.html
    > >> >>>>>
    > >> >>>>>Agrees with what I've heard. First attempt should be something
    > >> >>>>>you've
    > >> >>>>>tripled in the gym, second should be something you're still pretty
    > >> >>>>>sure
    > >> >>>>>of getting, often a slight PR if training and taper has been going
    > >> >>>>>well.
    > >> >>>>
    > >> >>>> Thanx Steve
    > >> >>>
    > >> >>>No problem. In the two meets I've done, it's the approach I've used
    > >> >>>and
    > >> >>>I went 8 for 9 both times so it seems about right to me.
    > >> >>>
    > >> >>>-S-
    > >> >>>http://www.kbnj.com
    > >> >>
    > >> >> What about spotters? The meets supply their own, right? One for each
    > >> >> side of the bar?
    > >> >
    > >> >The meets I've been at have supplied more than enough spotters, but for
    > >> >bench, a lifter often prefers to supply his own person to take the
    > >> >center position for hand-off if that's possible.
    > >> >
    > >> >-S-
    > >>
    > >> Why is one person in the middle better than one at each end? I was
    > >> spotting my friend today and he did worse with me spotting than by
    > >> unracking it himself. If I'm not mistaken (but I could be), the meet
    > >> requires spotters to unrack the bar and give it to the lifter at
    > >> lockout. I know I can't do that by myself standing behind his head
    > >> with a 380 lb bar.

    > >
    > >I've done a few world meets and actually been requested to give the hand
    > >off by some lifters attempting records. (At CPU/IPF meets you can't have
    > >your own guy do the hand off.)
    > >
    > >I've been told it makes a difference. I've also done hand offs for lifters
    > >doing over 600 lbs. You don't have to take all the weight, obviously.
    > >
    > >What I try and do is get the bar to the perfect position for the lifter -
    > >normally out over their chest - and then let the bar go in such a way that
    > >it feels light for the lifter. So I take as much weight off as I can, get
    > >the bar to where the lifter wants it, and then let the remainder of the
    > >weight drop onto the lifter gradually - I don't just 'plonk' the bar onto
    > >them.
    > >
    > >It can depend on the lifter, but with a 400 or so bench I felt the hand
    > >off could be worth 10-15 lbs for me.

    >
    > Interesting Keith. You feel one guy in the middle can be better than
    > one guy at each end?
    >
    > What are the critical stats/factors for one guy doing a hand off to
    > someone benching 380? Should the spotter be able to DL and/or Good
    > Morning a certain amount? My training partner uses the top pin on the
    > bench. I'm 5'10" Should I be standing on an elevated platform?
    > (I was.) If so, how high should the platform be? Exactly how are you
    > positioned to help get the bar over the lifter's chest and then
    > gradually release the remainder of the weight onto the lifter?


    I think it isn't the amount lifted, but giving it to the person in the
    right position and then letting the weight onto the person smoothly. The
    two people never give it to you perfectly evenly. I've used two people in
    a meet if the guy in the back was crappy because at least then you have a
    chance to get the bar over your chest. In a meet you want to set up well
    down the bench so you don't worry about bouncing the uprights.

    But if you have someone good I think it is more a matter of the person
    being smooth and reading your lift. On the first attempt I try and see how
    the person lifts and remember so I can get the bar into the right groove
    for them. I don't think there is a requirement for being able to do so
    much weight, but obviously a strong guy has an easier time getting the bar
    there.

    --
    Keith
     
  13. Hobbes

    Hobbes Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, John Hanson
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 22:49:12 -0600, [email protected] (Hobbes) wrote
    > in misc.fitness.weights:
    >
    > >In article <[email protected]>,
    > >[email protected] wrote:
    > >
    > >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 20:08:48 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    > >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> >news:[email protected]
    > >> >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 18:11:34 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    > >> >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> >>
    > >> >>><[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> >>>news:eek:[email protected]
    > >> >>>> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 13:58:15 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    > >> >>>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> >>>>
    > >> >>>>>http://www.usapowerlifting.com/newsletter/05/features/features.html
    > >> >>>>>
    > >> >>>>>Agrees with what I've heard. First attempt should be something
    > >> >>>>>you've
    > >> >>>>>tripled in the gym, second should be something you're still pretty
    > >> >>>>>sure
    > >> >>>>>of getting, often a slight PR if training and taper has been going
    > >> >>>>>well.
    > >> >>>>
    > >> >>>> Thanx Steve
    > >> >>>
    > >> >>>No problem. In the two meets I've done, it's the approach I've used
    > >> >>>and
    > >> >>>I went 8 for 9 both times so it seems about right to me.
    > >> >>>
    > >> >>>-S-
    > >> >>>http://www.kbnj.com
    > >> >>
    > >> >> What about spotters? The meets supply their own, right? One for each
    > >> >> side of the bar?
    > >> >
    > >> >The meets I've been at have supplied more than enough spotters, but for
    > >> >bench, a lifter often prefers to supply his own person to take the
    > >> >center position for hand-off if that's possible.
    > >> >
    > >> >-S-
    > >>
    > >> Why is one person in the middle better than one at each end? I was
    > >> spotting my friend today and he did worse with me spotting than by
    > >> unracking it himself. If I'm not mistaken (but I could be), the meet
    > >> requires spotters to unrack the bar and give it to the lifter at
    > >> lockout. I know I can't do that by myself standing behind his head
    > >> with a 380 lb bar.

    > >
    > >I've done a few world meets and actually been requested to give the hand
    > >off by some lifters attempting records. (At CPU/IPF meets you can't have
    > >your own guy do the hand off.)

    >
    > At USAPL national meets, they have a hand off guy and you can't use
    > your own. At least that is what I have observed but I've never seen
    > anything about it in the rules. The guy who handed off to me at
    > Masters Nationals last year gave me the best hand offs ever. Any
    > other USAPL meet, you can have your own guy.


    Then you agree a good hand off can make a difference?

    --
    Keith
     
  14. John Hanson

    John Hanson Guest

    On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 23:06:48 -0600, [email protected] (Hobbes) wrote
    in misc.fitness.weights:

    >In article <[email protected]>, John Hanson
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 22:49:12 -0600, [email protected] (Hobbes) wrote
    >> in misc.fitness.weights:
    >>
    >> >In article <[email protected]>,
    >> >[email protected] wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 20:08:48 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    >> >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >> ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >> >news:[email protected]
    >> >> >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 18:11:34 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    >> >> >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >>><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >> >>>news:eek:[email protected]
    >> >> >>>> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 13:58:15 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    >> >> >>>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >> >>>>
    >> >> >>>>>http://www.usapowerlifting.com/newsletter/05/features/features.html
    >> >> >>>>>
    >> >> >>>>>Agrees with what I've heard. First attempt should be something
    >> >> >>>>>you've
    >> >> >>>>>tripled in the gym, second should be something you're still pretty
    >> >> >>>>>sure
    >> >> >>>>>of getting, often a slight PR if training and taper has been going
    >> >> >>>>>well.
    >> >> >>>>
    >> >> >>>> Thanx Steve
    >> >> >>>
    >> >> >>>No problem. In the two meets I've done, it's the approach I've used
    >> >> >>>and
    >> >> >>>I went 8 for 9 both times so it seems about right to me.
    >> >> >>>
    >> >> >>>-S-
    >> >> >>>http://www.kbnj.com
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> What about spotters? The meets supply their own, right? One for each
    >> >> >> side of the bar?
    >> >> >
    >> >> >The meets I've been at have supplied more than enough spotters, but for
    >> >> >bench, a lifter often prefers to supply his own person to take the
    >> >> >center position for hand-off if that's possible.
    >> >> >
    >> >> >-S-
    >> >>
    >> >> Why is one person in the middle better than one at each end? I was
    >> >> spotting my friend today and he did worse with me spotting than by
    >> >> unracking it himself. If I'm not mistaken (but I could be), the meet
    >> >> requires spotters to unrack the bar and give it to the lifter at
    >> >> lockout. I know I can't do that by myself standing behind his head
    >> >> with a 380 lb bar.
    >> >
    >> >I've done a few world meets and actually been requested to give the hand
    >> >off by some lifters attempting records. (At CPU/IPF meets you can't have
    >> >your own guy do the hand off.)

    >>
    >> At USAPL national meets, they have a hand off guy and you can't use
    >> your own. At least that is what I have observed but I've never seen
    >> anything about it in the rules. The guy who handed off to me at
    >> Masters Nationals last year gave me the best hand offs ever. Any
    >> other USAPL meet, you can have your own guy.

    >
    >Then you agree a good hand off can make a difference?


    All the difference in the world. I've gotten hand offs in the gym
    where I thought I was going to drop it on my face because that is
    where they let go off the bar. I like it right in line with my
    nipples.
     
  15. On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 23:06:00 -0600, [email protected] (Hobbes)
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    >[email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 22:49:12 -0600, [email protected] (Hobbes)
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >> >In article <[email protected]>,
    >> >[email protected] wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 20:08:48 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    >> >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >> ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >> >news:[email protected]
    >> >> >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 18:11:34 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    >> >> >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >>><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >> >>>news:eek:[email protected]
    >> >> >>>> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 13:58:15 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    >> >> >>>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >> >>>>
    >> >> >>>>>http://www.usapowerlifting.com/newsletter/05/features/features.html
    >> >> >>>>>
    >> >> >>>>>Agrees with what I've heard. First attempt should be something
    >> >> >>>>>you've
    >> >> >>>>>tripled in the gym, second should be something you're still pretty
    >> >> >>>>>sure
    >> >> >>>>>of getting, often a slight PR if training and taper has been going
    >> >> >>>>>well.
    >> >> >>>>
    >> >> >>>> Thanx Steve
    >> >> >>>
    >> >> >>>No problem. In the two meets I've done, it's the approach I've used
    >> >> >>>and
    >> >> >>>I went 8 for 9 both times so it seems about right to me.
    >> >> >>>
    >> >> >>>-S-
    >> >> >>>http://www.kbnj.com
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> What about spotters? The meets supply their own, right? One for each
    >> >> >> side of the bar?
    >> >> >
    >> >> >The meets I've been at have supplied more than enough spotters, but for
    >> >> >bench, a lifter often prefers to supply his own person to take the
    >> >> >center position for hand-off if that's possible.
    >> >> >
    >> >> >-S-
    >> >>
    >> >> Why is one person in the middle better than one at each end? I was
    >> >> spotting my friend today and he did worse with me spotting than by
    >> >> unracking it himself. If I'm not mistaken (but I could be), the meet
    >> >> requires spotters to unrack the bar and give it to the lifter at
    >> >> lockout. I know I can't do that by myself standing behind his head
    >> >> with a 380 lb bar.
    >> >
    >> >I've done a few world meets and actually been requested to give the hand
    >> >off by some lifters attempting records. (At CPU/IPF meets you can't have
    >> >your own guy do the hand off.)
    >> >
    >> >I've been told it makes a difference. I've also done hand offs for lifters
    >> >doing over 600 lbs. You don't have to take all the weight, obviously.
    >> >
    >> >What I try and do is get the bar to the perfect position for the lifter -
    >> >normally out over their chest - and then let the bar go in such a way that
    >> >it feels light for the lifter. So I take as much weight off as I can, get
    >> >the bar to where the lifter wants it, and then let the remainder of the
    >> >weight drop onto the lifter gradually - I don't just 'plonk' the bar onto
    >> >them.
    >> >
    >> >It can depend on the lifter, but with a 400 or so bench I felt the hand
    >> >off could be worth 10-15 lbs for me.

    >>
    >> Interesting Keith. You feel one guy in the middle can be better than
    >> one guy at each end?
    >>
    >> What are the critical stats/factors for one guy doing a hand off to
    >> someone benching 380? Should the spotter be able to DL and/or Good
    >> Morning a certain amount? My training partner uses the top pin on the
    >> bench. I'm 5'10" Should I be standing on an elevated platform?
    >> (I was.) If so, how high should the platform be? Exactly how are you
    >> positioned to help get the bar over the lifter's chest and then
    >> gradually release the remainder of the weight onto the lifter?

    >
    >I think it isn't the amount lifted, but giving it to the person in the
    >right position and then letting the weight onto the person smoothly. The
    >two people never give it to you perfectly evenly. I've used two people in
    >a meet if the guy in the back was crappy because at least then you have a
    >chance to get the bar over your chest. In a meet you want to set up well
    >down the bench so you don't worry about bouncing the uprights.
    >
    >But if you have someone good I think it is more a matter of the person
    >being smooth and reading your lift. On the first attempt I try and see how
    >the person lifts and remember so I can get the bar into the right groove
    >for them. I don't think there is a requirement for being able to do so
    >much weight, but obviously a strong guy has an easier time getting the bar
    >there.


    I'd like to see an online tutorial, video, or jpg sequence
    illustrating the "spot lift."

    What are the biomechanics of this lift? Knees slightly bent, mixed
    grip, back slightly forward, gaze always downward, etc.?

    How high should the spotter's platform be? How tall should the
    spotter be relative to the pin the bar is resting on?

    How should the bencher and the spotter be positioned relative to each
    other so that the spotter doesn't have to move the bar too far forward
    to get it into the right position for the controlled descent?

    I'm assuming the bencher is always helping (unracking the bar and
    bringing it to the correct position) and that the spotter is not
    unracking the bar and bringing it to the correct position and then
    gradually lowering it to the bencher's outstretched hands all by
    himself.

    I ask these questions because I'm the spotter for a guy who wants to
    max out at 275-280 at a meet two weeks away. We work together in
    unracking the bar and getting it to the correct position for him, but
    his performance is a lot worse when I "help" him. (I'm not
    overlooking the fact that he started pausing a split-second longer at
    bottom when I started helping him unrack and position the bar. (He
    never "bounces" it.) The total time under tension is doubtless
    longer. My sense is that I'm not giving him all that much help
    unracking the bar and that my assistance is negligible as the bar
    moves forward (away from me) to get it into the correct pposition for
    him.

    I don't get the "give it to him smoothly" part although that sounds
    great. How do you do this and tell when you have and haven't done
    this right?
     
  16. John Hanson

    John Hanson Guest

    On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 17:40:33 GMT, [email protected] wrote in
    misc.fitness.weights:

    >On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 23:06:00 -0600, [email protected] (Hobbes)
    >wrote:
    >
    >>In article <[email protected]>,
    >>[email protected] wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 22:49:12 -0600, [email protected] (Hobbes)
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> >In article <[email protected]>,
    >>> >[email protected] wrote:
    >>> >
    >>> >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 20:08:48 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    >>> >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> >>
    >>> >> ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> >> >news:[email protected]
    >>> >> >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 18:11:34 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    >>> >> >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> >> >>
    >>> >> >>><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> >> >>>news:eek:[email protected]
    >>> >> >>>> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 13:58:15 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    >>> >> >>>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> >> >>>>
    >>> >> >>>>>http://www.usapowerlifting.com/newsletter/05/features/features.html
    >>> >> >>>>>
    >>> >> >>>>>Agrees with what I've heard. First attempt should be something
    >>> >> >>>>>you've
    >>> >> >>>>>tripled in the gym, second should be something you're still pretty
    >>> >> >>>>>sure
    >>> >> >>>>>of getting, often a slight PR if training and taper has been going
    >>> >> >>>>>well.
    >>> >> >>>>
    >>> >> >>>> Thanx Steve
    >>> >> >>>
    >>> >> >>>No problem. In the two meets I've done, it's the approach I've used
    >>> >> >>>and
    >>> >> >>>I went 8 for 9 both times so it seems about right to me.
    >>> >> >>>
    >>> >> >>>-S-
    >>> >> >>>http://www.kbnj.com
    >>> >> >>
    >>> >> >> What about spotters? The meets supply their own, right? One for each
    >>> >> >> side of the bar?
    >>> >> >
    >>> >> >The meets I've been at have supplied more than enough spotters, but for
    >>> >> >bench, a lifter often prefers to supply his own person to take the
    >>> >> >center position for hand-off if that's possible.
    >>> >> >
    >>> >> >-S-
    >>> >>
    >>> >> Why is one person in the middle better than one at each end? I was
    >>> >> spotting my friend today and he did worse with me spotting than by
    >>> >> unracking it himself. If I'm not mistaken (but I could be), the meet
    >>> >> requires spotters to unrack the bar and give it to the lifter at
    >>> >> lockout. I know I can't do that by myself standing behind his head
    >>> >> with a 380 lb bar.
    >>> >
    >>> >I've done a few world meets and actually been requested to give the hand
    >>> >off by some lifters attempting records. (At CPU/IPF meets you can't have
    >>> >your own guy do the hand off.)
    >>> >
    >>> >I've been told it makes a difference. I've also done hand offs for lifters
    >>> >doing over 600 lbs. You don't have to take all the weight, obviously.
    >>> >
    >>> >What I try and do is get the bar to the perfect position for the lifter -
    >>> >normally out over their chest - and then let the bar go in such a way that
    >>> >it feels light for the lifter. So I take as much weight off as I can, get
    >>> >the bar to where the lifter wants it, and then let the remainder of the
    >>> >weight drop onto the lifter gradually - I don't just 'plonk' the bar onto
    >>> >them.
    >>> >
    >>> >It can depend on the lifter, but with a 400 or so bench I felt the hand
    >>> >off could be worth 10-15 lbs for me.
    >>>
    >>> Interesting Keith. You feel one guy in the middle can be better than
    >>> one guy at each end?
    >>>
    >>> What are the critical stats/factors for one guy doing a hand off to
    >>> someone benching 380? Should the spotter be able to DL and/or Good
    >>> Morning a certain amount? My training partner uses the top pin on the
    >>> bench. I'm 5'10" Should I be standing on an elevated platform?
    >>> (I was.) If so, how high should the platform be? Exactly how are you
    >>> positioned to help get the bar over the lifter's chest and then
    >>> gradually release the remainder of the weight onto the lifter?

    >>
    >>I think it isn't the amount lifted, but giving it to the person in the
    >>right position and then letting the weight onto the person smoothly. The
    >>two people never give it to you perfectly evenly. I've used two people in
    >>a meet if the guy in the back was crappy because at least then you have a
    >>chance to get the bar over your chest. In a meet you want to set up well
    >>down the bench so you don't worry about bouncing the uprights.
    >>
    >>But if you have someone good I think it is more a matter of the person
    >>being smooth and reading your lift. On the first attempt I try and see how
    >>the person lifts and remember so I can get the bar into the right groove
    >>for them. I don't think there is a requirement for being able to do so
    >>much weight, but obviously a strong guy has an easier time getting the bar
    >>there.

    >
    >I'd like to see an online tutorial, video, or jpg sequence
    >illustrating the "spot lift."
    >
    >What are the biomechanics of this lift? Knees slightly bent, mixed
    >grip, back slightly forward, gaze always downward, etc.?
    >
    >How high should the spotter's platform be? How tall should the
    >spotter be relative to the pin the bar is resting on?
    >
    >How should the bencher and the spotter be positioned relative to each
    >other so that the spotter doesn't have to move the bar too far forward
    >to get it into the right position for the controlled descent?
    >
    >I'm assuming the bencher is always helping (unracking the bar and
    >bringing it to the correct position) and that the spotter is not
    >unracking the bar and bringing it to the correct position and then
    >gradually lowering it to the bencher's outstretched hands all by
    >himself.
    >
    >I ask these questions because I'm the spotter for a guy who wants to
    >max out at 275-280 at a meet two weeks away. We work together in
    >unracking the bar and getting it to the correct position for him, but
    >his performance is a lot worse when I "help" him. (I'm not
    >overlooking the fact that he started pausing a split-second longer at
    >bottom when I started helping him unrack and position the bar. (He
    >never "bounces" it.) The total time under tension is doubtless
    >longer. My sense is that I'm not giving him all that much help
    >unracking the bar and that my assistance is negligible as the bar
    >moves forward (away from me) to get it into the correct pposition for
    >him.
    >
    >I don't get the "give it to him smoothly" part although that sounds
    >great. How do you do this and tell when you have and haven't done
    >this right?


    Practice makes perfect. You should also have some idea from when
    people give you a "pick".
     
  17. Hobbes

    Hobbes Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 23:06:00 -0600, [email protected] (Hobbes)
    > wrote:
    >
    > >In article <[email protected]>,
    > >[email protected] wrote:
    > >
    > >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 22:49:12 -0600, [email protected] (Hobbes)
    > >> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >In article <[email protected]>,
    > >> >[email protected] wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 20:08:48 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    > >> >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> >>
    > >> >> ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> >> >news:[email protected]
    > >> >> >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 18:11:34 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    > >> >> >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >>><[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> >> >>>news:eek:[email protected]
    > >> >> >>>> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 13:58:15 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    > >> >> >>>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> >> >>>>
    > >> >> >>>>>http://www.usapowerlifting.com/newsletter/05/features/features.html
    > >> >> >>>>>
    > >> >> >>>>>Agrees with what I've heard. First attempt should be something
    > >> >> >>>>>you've
    > >> >> >>>>>tripled in the gym, second should be something you're still pretty
    > >> >> >>>>>sure
    > >> >> >>>>>of getting, often a slight PR if training and taper has been going
    > >> >> >>>>>well.
    > >> >> >>>>
    > >> >> >>>> Thanx Steve
    > >> >> >>>
    > >> >> >>>No problem. In the two meets I've done, it's the approach I've used
    > >> >> >>>and
    > >> >> >>>I went 8 for 9 both times so it seems about right to me.
    > >> >> >>>
    > >> >> >>>-S-
    > >> >> >>>http://www.kbnj.com
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> What about spotters? The meets supply their own, right? One

    for each
    > >> >> >> side of the bar?
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >The meets I've been at have supplied more than enough spotters,

    but for
    > >> >> >bench, a lifter often prefers to supply his own person to take the
    > >> >> >center position for hand-off if that's possible.
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >-S-
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Why is one person in the middle better than one at each end? I was
    > >> >> spotting my friend today and he did worse with me spotting than by
    > >> >> unracking it himself. If I'm not mistaken (but I could be), the meet
    > >> >> requires spotters to unrack the bar and give it to the lifter at
    > >> >> lockout. I know I can't do that by myself standing behind his head
    > >> >> with a 380 lb bar.
    > >> >
    > >> >I've done a few world meets and actually been requested to give the hand
    > >> >off by some lifters attempting records. (At CPU/IPF meets you can't have
    > >> >your own guy do the hand off.)
    > >> >
    > >> >I've been told it makes a difference. I've also done hand offs for lifters
    > >> >doing over 600 lbs. You don't have to take all the weight, obviously.
    > >> >
    > >> >What I try and do is get the bar to the perfect position for the lifter -
    > >> >normally out over their chest - and then let the bar go in such a way that
    > >> >it feels light for the lifter. So I take as much weight off as I can, get
    > >> >the bar to where the lifter wants it, and then let the remainder of the
    > >> >weight drop onto the lifter gradually - I don't just 'plonk' the bar onto
    > >> >them.
    > >> >
    > >> >It can depend on the lifter, but with a 400 or so bench I felt the hand
    > >> >off could be worth 10-15 lbs for me.
    > >>
    > >> Interesting Keith. You feel one guy in the middle can be better than
    > >> one guy at each end?
    > >>
    > >> What are the critical stats/factors for one guy doing a hand off to
    > >> someone benching 380? Should the spotter be able to DL and/or Good
    > >> Morning a certain amount? My training partner uses the top pin on the
    > >> bench. I'm 5'10" Should I be standing on an elevated platform?
    > >> (I was.) If so, how high should the platform be? Exactly how are you
    > >> positioned to help get the bar over the lifter's chest and then
    > >> gradually release the remainder of the weight onto the lifter?

    > >
    > >I think it isn't the amount lifted, but giving it to the person in the
    > >right position and then letting the weight onto the person smoothly. The
    > >two people never give it to you perfectly evenly. I've used two people in
    > >a meet if the guy in the back was crappy because at least then you have a
    > >chance to get the bar over your chest. In a meet you want to set up well
    > >down the bench so you don't worry about bouncing the uprights.
    > >
    > >But if you have someone good I think it is more a matter of the person
    > >being smooth and reading your lift. On the first attempt I try and see how
    > >the person lifts and remember so I can get the bar into the right groove
    > >for them. I don't think there is a requirement for being able to do so
    > >much weight, but obviously a strong guy has an easier time getting the bar
    > >there.

    >
    > I'd like to see an online tutorial, video, or jpg sequence
    > illustrating the "spot lift."


    Go to the IPF site and watch the video of the bench lifts.
    >
    > What are the biomechanics of this lift? Knees slightly bent, mixed
    > grip, back slightly forward, gaze always downward, etc.?


    Depends on the person, bench, weight, etc.
    >
    > How high should the spotter's platform be? How tall should the
    > spotter be relative to the pin the bar is resting on?


    C'mon. Get real.
    >
    > How should the bencher and the spotter be positioned relative to each
    > other so that the spotter doesn't have to move the bar too far forward
    > to get it into the right position for the controlled descent?


    Spotter lifts the bar over the bencher.
    >
    > I'm assuming the bencher is always helping (unracking the bar and
    > bringing it to the correct position) and that the spotter is not
    > unracking the bar and bringing it to the correct position and then
    > gradually lowering it to the bencher's outstretched hands all by
    > himself.


    Mostly. I've seen some guys who leave a lot to the spotter. But if you
    want the bar in position you gotta help.
    >
    > I ask these questions because I'm the spotter for a guy who wants to
    > max out at 275-280 at a meet two weeks away. We work together in
    > unracking the bar and getting it to the correct position for him, but
    > his performance is a lot worse when I "help" him. (I'm not
    > overlooking the fact that he started pausing a split-second longer at
    > bottom when I started helping him unrack and position the bar. (He
    > never "bounces" it.) The total time under tension is doubtless
    > longer. My sense is that I'm not giving him all that much help
    > unracking the bar and that my assistance is negligible as the bar
    > moves forward (away from me) to get it into the correct pposition for
    > him.
    >
    > I don't get the "give it to him smoothly" part although that sounds
    > great. How do you do this and tell when you have and haven't done
    > this right?


    You think of him taking a bar that is 40 lbs or so lighter and then
    release the 40 lbs slowly.

    --
    Keith
     
  18. On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 13:37:38 -0600, [email protected] (Hobbes)
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    >[email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 23:06:00 -0600, [email protected] (Hobbes)
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >> >In article <[email protected]>,
    >> >[email protected] wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 22:49:12 -0600, [email protected] (Hobbes)
    >> >> wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >> >In article <[email protected]>,
    >> >> >[email protected] wrote:
    >> >> >
    >> >> >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 20:08:48 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    >> >> >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >> >> >news:[email protected]
    >> >> >> >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 18:11:34 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    >> >> >> >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >> >> >>
    >> >> >> >>><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >> >> >>>news:eek:[email protected]
    >> >> >> >>>> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 13:58:15 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    >> >> >> >>>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >> >> >>>>
    >> >> >> >>>>>http://www.usapowerlifting.com/newsletter/05/features/features.html
    >> >> >> >>>>>
    >> >> >> >>>>>Agrees with what I've heard. First attempt should be something
    >> >> >> >>>>>you've
    >> >> >> >>>>>tripled in the gym, second should be something you're still pretty
    >> >> >> >>>>>sure
    >> >> >> >>>>>of getting, often a slight PR if training and taper has been going
    >> >> >> >>>>>well.
    >> >> >> >>>>
    >> >> >> >>>> Thanx Steve
    >> >> >> >>>
    >> >> >> >>>No problem. In the two meets I've done, it's the approach I've used
    >> >> >> >>>and
    >> >> >> >>>I went 8 for 9 both times so it seems about right to me.
    >> >> >> >>>
    >> >> >> >>>-S-
    >> >> >> >>>http://www.kbnj.com
    >> >> >> >>
    >> >> >> >> What about spotters? The meets supply their own, right? One

    >for each
    >> >> >> >> side of the bar?
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >> >The meets I've been at have supplied more than enough spotters,

    >but for
    >> >> >> >bench, a lifter often prefers to supply his own person to take the
    >> >> >> >center position for hand-off if that's possible.
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >> >-S-
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> Why is one person in the middle better than one at each end? I was
    >> >> >> spotting my friend today and he did worse with me spotting than by
    >> >> >> unracking it himself. If I'm not mistaken (but I could be), the meet
    >> >> >> requires spotters to unrack the bar and give it to the lifter at
    >> >> >> lockout. I know I can't do that by myself standing behind his head
    >> >> >> with a 380 lb bar.
    >> >> >
    >> >> >I've done a few world meets and actually been requested to give the hand
    >> >> >off by some lifters attempting records. (At CPU/IPF meets you can't have
    >> >> >your own guy do the hand off.)
    >> >> >
    >> >> >I've been told it makes a difference. I've also done hand offs for lifters
    >> >> >doing over 600 lbs. You don't have to take all the weight, obviously.
    >> >> >
    >> >> >What I try and do is get the bar to the perfect position for the lifter -
    >> >> >normally out over their chest - and then let the bar go in such a way that
    >> >> >it feels light for the lifter. So I take as much weight off as I can, get
    >> >> >the bar to where the lifter wants it, and then let the remainder of the
    >> >> >weight drop onto the lifter gradually - I don't just 'plonk' the bar onto
    >> >> >them.
    >> >> >
    >> >> >It can depend on the lifter, but with a 400 or so bench I felt the hand
    >> >> >off could be worth 10-15 lbs for me.
    >> >>
    >> >> Interesting Keith. You feel one guy in the middle can be better than
    >> >> one guy at each end?
    >> >>
    >> >> What are the critical stats/factors for one guy doing a hand off to
    >> >> someone benching 380? Should the spotter be able to DL and/or Good
    >> >> Morning a certain amount? My training partner uses the top pin on the
    >> >> bench. I'm 5'10" Should I be standing on an elevated platform?
    >> >> (I was.) If so, how high should the platform be? Exactly how are you
    >> >> positioned to help get the bar over the lifter's chest and then
    >> >> gradually release the remainder of the weight onto the lifter?
    >> >
    >> >I think it isn't the amount lifted, but giving it to the person in the
    >> >right position and then letting the weight onto the person smoothly. The
    >> >two people never give it to you perfectly evenly. I've used two people in
    >> >a meet if the guy in the back was crappy because at least then you have a
    >> >chance to get the bar over your chest. In a meet you want to set up well
    >> >down the bench so you don't worry about bouncing the uprights.
    >> >
    >> >But if you have someone good I think it is more a matter of the person
    >> >being smooth and reading your lift. On the first attempt I try and see how
    >> >the person lifts and remember so I can get the bar into the right groove
    >> >for them. I don't think there is a requirement for being able to do so
    >> >much weight, but obviously a strong guy has an easier time getting the bar
    >> >there.

    >>
    >> I'd like to see an online tutorial, video, or jpg sequence
    >> illustrating the "spot lift."

    >
    >Go to the IPF site and watch the video of the bench lifts.


    Very blurry with my dial-up connection. Couldn't tell what kind of
    grip the spotters were using. I suspect pronated. I don't think the
    end spotters were helping to unrack/maneuver bar into position, but I
    really couldn't tell.
    >> What are the biomechanics of this lift? Knees slightly bent, mixed
    >> grip, back slightly forward, gaze always downward, etc.?

    >
    >Depends on the person, bench, weight, etc.
    >>
    >> How high should the spotter's platform be? How tall should the
    >> spotter be relative to the pin the bar is resting on?

    >
    >C'mon. Get real.

    Is that really such a silly question? Looks like the IPF spotters in
    the video aren't short and they are standing on a platform. You don't
    have a general impression as to whether bench spotters are relatively
    tall or not? There's no platform connected to the particular bench
    station where I usually help my friend lift. So I improvise by using
    a short wooden platform and a 45 lb plate. When I spot, I always wish
    I were taller. I'm 5'10" I'm pretty sure my arms are bent more than
    the spotters in the video. So I'd like to know the height of the IPF
    spotter platform.
    >>
    >> How should the bencher and the spotter be positioned relative to each
    >> other so that the spotter doesn't have to move the bar too far forward
    >> to get it into the right position for the controlled descent?

    >
    >Spotter lifts the bar over the bencher.


    I don't think the IPF spotters are leaning more than slightly forward.

    >> I'm assuming the bencher is always helping (unracking the bar and
    >> bringing it to the correct position) and that the spotter is not
    >> unracking the bar and bringing it to the correct position and then
    >> gradually lowering it to the bencher's outstretched hands all by
    >> himself.

    >
    >Mostly. I've seen some guys who leave a lot to the spotter. But if you
    >want the bar in position you gotta help.
    >>
    >> I ask these questions because I'm the spotter for a guy who wants to
    >> max out at 275-280 at a meet two weeks away. We work together in
    >> unracking the bar and getting it to the correct position for him, but
    >> his performance is a lot worse when I "help" him. (I'm not
    >> overlooking the fact that he started pausing a split-second longer at
    >> bottom when I started helping him unrack and position the bar. (He
    >> never "bounces" it.) The total time under tension is doubtless
    >> longer. My sense is that I'm not giving him all that much help
    >> unracking the bar and that my assistance is negligible as the bar
    >> moves forward (away from me) to get it into the correct pposition for
    >> him.
    >>
    >> I don't get the "give it to him smoothly" part although that sounds
    >> great. How do you do this and tell when you have and haven't done
    >> this right?

    >
    >You think of him taking a bar that is 40 lbs or so lighter and then
    >release the 40 lbs slowly.
     
  19. On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 13:19:03 -0600, John Hanson
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 17:40:33 GMT, [email protected] wrote in
    >misc.fitness.weights:
    >
    >>On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 23:06:00 -0600, [email protected] (Hobbes)
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>In article <[email protected]>,
    >>>[email protected] wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 22:49:12 -0600, [email protected] (Hobbes)
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> >In article <[email protected]>,
    >>>> >[email protected] wrote:
    >>>> >
    >>>> >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 20:08:48 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    >>>> >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>> >>
    >>>> >> ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>> >> >news:[email protected]
    >>>> >> >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 18:11:34 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    >>>> >> >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>> >> >>
    >>>> >> >>><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>> >> >>>news:eek:[email protected]
    >>>> >> >>>> On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 13:58:15 -0500, "Steve Freides"
    >>>> >> >>>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>> >> >>>>
    >>>> >> >>>>>http://www.usapowerlifting.com/newsletter/05/features/features.html
    >>>> >> >>>>>
    >>>> >> >>>>>Agrees with what I've heard. First attempt should be something
    >>>> >> >>>>>you've
    >>>> >> >>>>>tripled in the gym, second should be something you're still pretty
    >>>> >> >>>>>sure
    >>>> >> >>>>>of getting, often a slight PR if training and taper has been going
    >>>> >> >>>>>well.
    >>>> >> >>>>
    >>>> >> >>>> Thanx Steve
    >>>> >> >>>
    >>>> >> >>>No problem. In the two meets I've done, it's the approach I've used
    >>>> >> >>>and
    >>>> >> >>>I went 8 for 9 both times so it seems about right to me.
    >>>> >> >>>
    >>>> >> >>>-S-
    >>>> >> >>>http://www.kbnj.com
    >>>> >> >>
    >>>> >> >> What about spotters? The meets supply their own, right? One for each
    >>>> >> >> side of the bar?
    >>>> >> >
    >>>> >> >The meets I've been at have supplied more than enough spotters, but for
    >>>> >> >bench, a lifter often prefers to supply his own person to take the
    >>>> >> >center position for hand-off if that's possible.
    >>>> >> >
    >>>> >> >-S-
    >>>> >>
    >>>> >> Why is one person in the middle better than one at each end? I was
    >>>> >> spotting my friend today and he did worse with me spotting than by
    >>>> >> unracking it himself. If I'm not mistaken (but I could be), the meet
    >>>> >> requires spotters to unrack the bar and give it to the lifter at
    >>>> >> lockout. I know I can't do that by myself standing behind his head
    >>>> >> with a 380 lb bar.
    >>>> >
    >>>> >I've done a few world meets and actually been requested to give the hand
    >>>> >off by some lifters attempting records. (At CPU/IPF meets you can't have
    >>>> >your own guy do the hand off.)
    >>>> >
    >>>> >I've been told it makes a difference. I've also done hand offs for lifters
    >>>> >doing over 600 lbs. You don't have to take all the weight, obviously.
    >>>> >
    >>>> >What I try and do is get the bar to the perfect position for the lifter -
    >>>> >normally out over their chest - and then let the bar go in such a way that
    >>>> >it feels light for the lifter. So I take as much weight off as I can, get
    >>>> >the bar to where the lifter wants it, and then let the remainder of the
    >>>> >weight drop onto the lifter gradually - I don't just 'plonk' the bar onto
    >>>> >them.
    >>>> >
    >>>> >It can depend on the lifter, but with a 400 or so bench I felt the hand
    >>>> >off could be worth 10-15 lbs for me.
    >>>>
    >>>> Interesting Keith. You feel one guy in the middle can be better than
    >>>> one guy at each end?
    >>>>
    >>>> What are the critical stats/factors for one guy doing a hand off to
    >>>> someone benching 380? Should the spotter be able to DL and/or Good
    >>>> Morning a certain amount? My training partner uses the top pin on the
    >>>> bench. I'm 5'10" Should I be standing on an elevated platform?
    >>>> (I was.) If so, how high should the platform be? Exactly how are you
    >>>> positioned to help get the bar over the lifter's chest and then
    >>>> gradually release the remainder of the weight onto the lifter?
    >>>
    >>>I think it isn't the amount lifted, but giving it to the person in the
    >>>right position and then letting the weight onto the person smoothly. The
    >>>two people never give it to you perfectly evenly. I've used two people in
    >>>a meet if the guy in the back was crappy because at least then you have a
    >>>chance to get the bar over your chest. In a meet you want to set up well
    >>>down the bench so you don't worry about bouncing the uprights.
    >>>
    >>>But if you have someone good I think it is more a matter of the person
    >>>being smooth and reading your lift. On the first attempt I try and see how
    >>>the person lifts and remember so I can get the bar into the right groove
    >>>for them. I don't think there is a requirement for being able to do so
    >>>much weight, but obviously a strong guy has an easier time getting the bar
    >>>there.

    >>
    >>I'd like to see an online tutorial, video, or jpg sequence
    >>illustrating the "spot lift."
    >>
    >>What are the biomechanics of this lift? Knees slightly bent, mixed
    >>grip, back slightly forward, gaze always downward, etc.?
    >>
    >>How high should the spotter's platform be? How tall should the
    >>spotter be relative to the pin the bar is resting on?
    >>
    >>How should the bencher and the spotter be positioned relative to each
    >>other so that the spotter doesn't have to move the bar too far forward
    >>to get it into the right position for the controlled descent?
    >>
    >>I'm assuming the bencher is always helping (unracking the bar and
    >>bringing it to the correct position) and that the spotter is not
    >>unracking the bar and bringing it to the correct position and then
    >>gradually lowering it to the bencher's outstretched hands all by
    >>himself.
    >>
    >>I ask these questions because I'm the spotter for a guy who wants to
    >>max out at 275-280 at a meet two weeks away. We work together in
    >>unracking the bar and getting it to the correct position for him, but
    >>his performance is a lot worse when I "help" him. (I'm not
    >>overlooking the fact that he started pausing a split-second longer at
    >>bottom when I started helping him unrack and position the bar. (He
    >>never "bounces" it.) The total time under tension is doubtless
    >>longer. My sense is that I'm not giving him all that much help
    >>unracking the bar and that my assistance is negligible as the bar
    >>moves forward (away from me) to get it into the correct pposition for
    >>him.
    >>
    >>I don't get the "give it to him smoothly" part although that sounds
    >>great. How do you do this and tell when you have and haven't done
    >>this right?

    >
    >Practice makes perfect. You should also have some idea from when
    >people give you a "pick".


    Please explain.
     
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