First bike in a long time - very confused



pug_dog

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Aug 18, 2006
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I am looking for a bike to ride reasonably fast on weekends around town and on bike paths to get fit and see the area. It is very hilly here (Seattle). My shortlist is Trek FX7.2 (Woman's Specific Design) and Marin Larkspur (Woman's). WSD seemed like a good idea since I am 5'2". Both are ~$400 and I like the relatively upright position. They are the same weight at 27lb. I have test ridden them all. Leaning towards the Marin right now, but not really sure why apart from the smoother tires, adjustable handlebars and cool brushed silver color.

http://www.marinbikes.com/bicycles_2006/html/bikes/bike_specs/specs_larkspur.html
http://www2.trekbikes.com/bikes/bike.php?bikeid=1323013&f=26
http://www.konaworld.com/shopping_cart/FrontEnd/Products/product_detail.aspx?productid=346&parentid=253 (This one looks good as well)

This is my first bike since university, my previous bike was a comfort bike.
 

lks

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Jul 29, 2006
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pug_dog said:
I am looking for a bike to ride reasonably fast on weekends around town and on bike paths to get fit and see the area. It is very hilly here (Seattle). My shortlist is Trek FX7.2 (Woman's Specific Design) and Marin Larkspur (Woman's). WSD seemed like a good idea since I am 5'2". Both are ~$400 and I like the relatively upright position. They are the same weight at 27lb. I have test ridden them all. Leaning towards the Marin right now, but not really sure why apart from the smoother tires, adjustable handlebars and cool brushed silver color.

http://www.marinbikes.com/bicycles_2006/html/bikes/bike_specs/specs_larkspur.html
http://www2.trekbikes.com/bikes/bike.php?bikeid=1323013&f=26
http://www.konaworld.com/shopping_cart/FrontEnd/Products/product_detail.aspx?productid=346&parentid=253 (This one looks good as well)

This is my first bike since university, my previous bike was a comfort bike.
I would suggest a WSD road bike, with a compact crankset. You could save at least 10lbs and still get very low gearing, without the shifting and tuning complexity of a triple crankset. A great advantage when climbing. A road bike can be setup to give a high enough bar position, for a comfortable upright riding position.
 

allgoodppl

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Aug 8, 2005
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pug_dog said:
Leaning towards the Marin right now, but not really sure why apart from the smoother tires, adjustable handlebars and cool brushed silver color. This is my first bike since university, my previous bike was a comfort bike.
I prefer the Trek 7.2FX because the components and wheels (IMHO) are nicer. Note that the WSD also has the adjustable stem. The LBS should be able to swap you smooth tires if you want, although you may want to stay with the hybrid tires if you'll be on bike paths as well. One thing you'll notice with this bike over your comfort bike is the lack of front suspension, so you'll feel more of the road, and you can set it up for a more aggressive riding position if you want to go real fast!
 

RickF

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Jul 27, 2005
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lks said:
I would suggest a WSD road bike, with a compact crankset. You could save at least 10lbs and still get very low gearing, without the shifting and tuning complexity of a triple crankset. A great advantage when climbing. A road bike can be setup to give a high enough bar position, for a comfortable upright riding position.
I disagree with the notion that a triple is too complex to shift or tune. Modern triples work every bit as well as doubles. The only advangtage of a double is the few grams of weight savings, and that is only important if you are racing. For someone getting the first bike in a long time and living in a hilly area, I would rather have the triple.
 

pug_dog

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Aug 18, 2006
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Thanks for your comments - I am leaning towards the Marin over the Trek, as it seems to have a shorter top bar...since I am pretty small. Online is a Marin Lucas Valley at 30% off, so I am tempted as it would be ~4lb lighter, so I have ordered this to check it out this weekend. Slightly concerned that the ride will be very bumpy without a suspension seatpost. Does carbon soak up the vibrations well?
 

allgoodppl

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Aug 8, 2005
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pug_dog said:
Thanks for your comments - I am leaning towards the Marin over the Trek, as it seems to have a shorter top bar...since I am pretty small. Online is a Marin Lucas Valley at 30% off, so I am tempted as it would be ~4lb lighter, so I have ordered this to check it out this weekend. Slightly concerned that the ride will be very bumpy without a suspension seatpost. Does carbon soak up the vibrations well?
Sound great. This is a good time of year to buy, as year-end discounts can be found to make room for the '07 lines. Carbon does take a lot of high-frequency 'noise' vibration out of the ride, but not those big impact jolts that an active suspension would take away. You can always purchase a suspension seatpost, which will help. Riding with your arms bent will help you absorb vibrations up front so your shoulders and neck won't feel it as much either. Good luck and have fun riding! That's the most important part!!!!! :)
 

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