First bike ride - what are the essentials?



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W

Westie

Guest
"Westie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
>
> "bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> > determined wrote:
> > > I bought my bike and am planning a low-key ride this weekend of about
15
> > > miles.
> >
> > Depending on the terrain you ride, 15 miles is not really a 'low-key ride' - especially for your
> > first time out. Even if you're fit, you're going to be using different muscles. The one thing
> > you don't want to end up doing is getting very tired or in pain when you're still a long way
> > from home. You want to leave yourself keen for more.
> >
> > > What are the essentials? Water I'm guessing is #1...
> >
> > Water's always a good idea. After you've really started getting in to it, check out
> > www.camelbak.com
> >
> > For that
> > > matter, what type of gear/accessories do I need to go along with the
> bike?
> > > What do I need in a repair kit? Is it neccessary to buy the funky
bike
> > > shoes? Padded bicycle shorts? All I bought is the bike, a rack for
my
> car,
> > > and a helmet.
> >
> > Right the essentials (IMO)... Kit: You want gloves - they help keep your hands soft, and will
> > offer protection should you have a hand / ground interaction. Full-fingered is good. Glasses - a
> > pair of clear wrap-around glasses are a great investment as they keep bugs, branches and bits
> > chucked up from the wheels from going in your eyes. No need to go Oakley or the like, just
> > something cheap'll do - some people here even use industrial goggles. Shorts - Not really worth
> > skimping here as you'll pay for it in pain.
> >
> > In the backpack: Bike tool - your LBS should be able to advise you Spare tube and puncture
> > repair kit Small medi kit (including any medication) Food - there's another thread around at the
> > moment on this subject. Bananas are a bad idea - they don't like being chucked around a backpack
> > with tools, etc. Mobile - I believe you folks across the pond call it a 'cell phone'. For those
> > of us in Europe, coverage is complete, so it's worthwhile, but obviously pointless if you don't
> > have coverage where you are. NB - only to be used in an emergency. Like ordering pizza.
>
>
> I don't get complete coverage but i always take it with me. You'd be surprised sometimes where you
> can get some little pockets of coverage even in the remotest areas. And should i have some tragic,
> unrepairable fault
or
> damage to myself, limping to the nearest point of coverage is usually much closer than limping to
> the nearest point of civilisation. Last time I did that was when I had a major sidewall tear (the
> bike, not me) and
everything
> that I tried fixing it with failed. The g/f found me happily sitting by
the
> roadside munching a Mars bar while I was waiting. I also live with the optimistic hope that should
> I be lying unconcious
lost
> at the foot of a ravine that the search party, knowing that I always carry
a
> mobile, would have some high tech piece of equipment capable of finding a rogue cellphone signal
> amongst the wilderness....
>
>
> > Cash - never know when you'll need to buy food, drink or pay for a taxi when you're stuck in the
> > mountains with hypothermia <ahem>... If there's a chance of rain, pack a mac. PCs and Solaris
> > boxes don't work so well. Arf arf...
> >
> > Planning on attending some classes on the basics like
> > > shifting properly, making repairs, etc soon.
> >
> > Bike maintenance is very important and fortunately, it's not rocket science. People here will be
> > able to guide you, as will your LBS.
> >
> > Don't forget to have fun and then come back on Monday and write a RR (ride report).
>
> I'll second the ride report! Let us know how it went! I'll add that water (bottles in a cage or
> pack is fine), a patch kit, plastic tyre levers and a spare tube (and knowing how to use them),
> and padded shorts would be on my list of very basic essentials. Oh, and if alone be sure to tell
> someone where you are going and roughly
how
> long you'll be.
> --
> Westie
>

Oh yeah, nearly forgot <blush>, a bloody bike pump. They handy, they are!
--
Westie
 
B

Bb

Guest
On Tue, 29 Apr 2003 18:38:14 -0400, Technician wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
>> On Tue, 29 Apr 2003 12:11:40 -0500, Anthony Sloan wrote:
>>
>> > 37 cents
>>
>> ...in case you have an emergency need to mail something?
>
> Pay phone

A. A pay phone on the trail???
B. Then, why 37?

--
-BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
 
B

Bb

Guest
On Tue, 29 Apr 2003 15:55:25 -0700, Penny S. wrote:

> Oh, I have fresh ones too... but the emergency bar is just buried in there for an emergency. They
> just get kind of hard and chewy.

I had a Powerbar in the glove box of my truck "for emergencies" for about 5 years before I really
needed it. Funny, it didn't taste any different than a "fresh" one (which is why I quite buying
Powerbars".

--
-BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
 
J

Jd

Guest
T

Technician

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
> On Tue, 29 Apr 2003 18:38:14 -0400, Technician wrote:
> > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
> >> On Tue, 29 Apr 2003 12:11:40 -0500, Anthony Sloan wrote:
> >>
> >> > 37 cents
> >>
> >> ...in case you have an emergency need to mail something?
> >
> > Pay phone
>
> A. A pay phone on the trail???

good point

> B. Then, why 37?

Some phones are a little screwy. one near where i live costs $.25 to initiate the call, then after a
minute, it asks for $.04 for each additional minute (but it wont take pennies, go figure).

~Travis
--
travis57 at megalink dot net

travis5765.homelinux.net, Primary Administrator TF Custom Electronics, Owner/Founder/Developer
(current project: Automotive exhaust flame-thrower)
 
A

Anthony Sloan

Guest
Technician wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
>
>>On Tue, 29 Apr 2003 18:38:14 -0400, Technician wrote:
>>
>>>In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
>>>
>>>>On Tue, 29 Apr 2003 12:11:40 -0500, Anthony Sloan wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>37 cents
>>>>
>>>>...in case you have an emergency need to mail something?
>>>
>>>Pay phone
>>
>>A. A pay phone on the trail???
>
>
> good point
>
>
>>B. Then, why 37?
>
>
> Some phones are a little screwy. one near where i live costs $.25 to initiate the call, then after
> a minute, it asks for $.04 for each additional minute (but it wont take pennies, go figure).
>
> ~Travis

You are all wrong.

It is a random amount of change generated from the cash sale of several different pre ride pastries.

But if I ever need to buy a stamp, you bishes are OWNED!

;*)

A
--
My hands are full of thorns but I can't quit groping for the rose.
 
A

Anthony Sloan

Guest
BB wrote:
> On Tue, 29 Apr 2003 15:55:25 -0700, Penny S. wrote:
>
>
>>Oh, I have fresh ones too... but the emergency bar is just buried in there for an emergency. They
>>just get kind of hard and chewy.
>
>
> I had a Powerbar in the glove box of my truck "for emergencies" for about 5 years before I really
> needed it. Funny, it didn't taste any different than a "fresh" one (which is why I quite buying
> Powerbars".
>

'Core climbers keep a ration of Purina Monkey Chow in their kit. It is perfectly
serviceable emergency food that successfully resists any temptation of snacking on it when
one is merely peckish.

A
--
My hands are full of thorns but I can't quit groping for the rose.
 
S

Shaun Rimmer

Guest
Sorni <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...

> As for clothing, you don't need bike shoes (yet :) but you REALLY should
buy
> some padded shorts! Your butt will still hurt like hell at first, but(t) nothing like it will if
> you go unpadded. Also buy some gloves.
>
> I'm sure I've forgotten something, but this should at least get you
started
> :)
>

Cable ties. Bunch of 'em. Long, and strong ones. Trust me.

Shaun aRe
 
J

James Messick

Guest
"determined" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> I bought my bike and am planning a low-key ride this weekend of about 15 miles. What are the
> essentials? Water I'm guessing is #1... For that matter, what type of gear/accessories do I need
> to go along with the bike? What do I need in a repair kit? Is it neccessary to buy the funky bike
> shoes? Padded bicycle shorts? All I bought is the bike, a rack for my
car,
> and a helmet. Planning on attending some classes on the basics like shifting properly, making
> repairs, etc soon.
>
> Thanks again!
>
> determined

I think the best thing to take with you is a friend.
 
T

Technician

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
>
> "determined" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> > I bought my bike and am planning a low-key ride this weekend of about 15 miles. What are the
> > essentials? Water I'm guessing is #1... For that matter, what type of gear/accessories do I need
> > to go along with the bike? What do I need in a repair kit? Is it neccessary to buy the funky
> > bike shoes? Padded bicycle shorts? All I bought is the bike, a rack for my
> car,
> > and a helmet. Planning on attending some classes on the basics like shifting properly, making
> > repairs, etc soon.
> >
> > Thanks again!
> >
> > determined
>
> I think the best thing to take with you is a friend.
> >
> >
>
>
>

An excellent idea.

I personally don't ride with others much as i am more of a loner, but somebody new to the trails
would want to take along a friend. preferably an experienced off-road biker, but doesn't have to be
(mutual learning tends to make a friendship stronger).

If you do ride alone, a cell phone is nice in case of emergencies (providing you don't fall on
it). and at the very least, tell somebody where you are going and give 'em a rough timeline of
when you plan to be back, taking into account any mishaps, like changing a flat, finding a new
trail, and so on.

~Travis
--
travis57 at megalink dot net

travis5765.homelinux.net, Primary Administrator TF Custom Electronics, Owner/Founder/Developer
(current project: Automotive exhaust flame-thrower)
 
B

Bill Wheeler

Guest
On Tue, 29 Apr 2003 16:17:50 GMT, "determined" <[email protected]> wrote:

>I bought my bike and am planning a low-key ride this weekend of about 15 miles. What are the
>essentials? Water I'm guessing is #1...

Good guess. hydrate or die.

>For that matter, what type of gear/accessories do I need to go along with the bike?

Shirley you jest!....don't get me started.

>What do I need in a repair kit?

Simple tools that work on your bike.

>Is it neccessary to buy the funky bike shoes? Padded bicycle shorts?

I'd recommend padded shorts. go with the "funky bike shoes" later. I suspect you mean some type of
clippless shoes. Build some skills first then get them.

>All I bought is the bike, a rack for my car,

Why does your bike need a car rack? I'm not saying you don't but asses the reasons. Do you really
need to put transport you bike to your riding destination?

>and a helmet. Planning on attending some classes on the basics like shifting properly, making
>repairs, etc soon.

VERY GOOD!

>
>Thanks again!
>
>determined
>

Welcome aboard, Bill The mind serves properly as a window glass rather than as a reflector, that is,
the mind should give an immediate view instead of an interpretation of the world.
:-]
 
B

Bill Wheeler

Guest
On Tue, 29 Apr 2003 11:14:55 -0700, "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote:

>Steve Petree wrote:
>> Besides water you may want a little snack, such as a banana, or fat free fig newton.
>
>why fat free? Are you doing a special diet or something? Fat ( in appropriate amounts) is an
>essential componet of a good balanced diet... espeically for someone doing a sport that requires a
>lot of energy out put.

You go Penny!....A body NEEDS fat!

>
>Penny
>

Peace, Bill The mind serves properly as a window glass rather than as a reflector, that is, the mind
should give an immediate view instead of an interpretation of the world.
:-]
 
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