First Centry ride

Discussion in 'rec.bicycles.rides archive' started by Tim B, Jun 22, 2003.

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  1. Tim B

    Tim B Guest

    I've only been riding my road bike for about a month. I ride 20-25 miles daily, all on a rail trail
    bike path. Only about 11.5 mph average but it gets the job done. There's a century ride 6 weeks from
    now near me, billed as a flat-to-rolling tour with lots of support and not a race. They stop 5 times
    during the 100.

    It seems to me that if I can ride 25 in the morning and be ok to go to work afterwards without a lot
    of noticeable pain, I should be able to have a goal of doing 20 five times in a row with rest breaks
    in between and be fine. They have 10, 25, and 50 mile options, and I could bail from the 100 to the
    50 midway if I wanted to. I'm 44 without any health problems I can think of other than being about
    250 pounds and that's coming off nicely with the nice calorie expenditure from cycling. And thinking
    about the century gives me a nice, seemly unattainable goal, and that works for me. Within a couple
    of weeks I'll have appropriate shorts, shoes and shirts; the bike was expensive enough (Specialized
    Sequoia Sport, love it) that I skimped on the extras for the first month.

    Here's my questions.

    1. Am I nuts for thinking I can do this? My first inclination is to get a physical and explain what
    I'm up to, and presuming there's not a big problem there, go on.

    2. If it seems ok, how can I train for this? My first inclination is to do a 50 every couple of
    weeks on the rail trail, not early in the morning but later on in the day, 25 miles slightly
    uphill along a river, 25 miles back slightly downhill, and if that is comfortably achievable, go
    on and do the tour. Then in the days in between, work on getting up to about 14 mph, as it looks
    like from the brochure that they figure about that, and work on rolling hills.
     
    Tags:


  2. Tbgibb

    Tbgibb Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Tim B" <[email protected]> writes: snip
    >1. Am I nuts for thinking I can do this? My first inclination is to get a physical and explain
    > what I'm up to, and presuming there's not a big problem there, go on.

    Go for it. The support makes it practical. The physical is a good idea if you haven't seen a doctor
    for a while.

    >2. If it seems ok, how can I train for this? My first inclination is to do a 50 every couple of
    > weeks on the rail trail, not early in the morning but later on in the day, 25 miles slightly
    > uphill along a river, 25 miles back slightly downhill, and if that is comfortably achievable,
    > go on and do the tour. Then in the days in between, work on getting up to about 14 mph, as it
    > looks like from the brochure that they figure about that, and work on rolling hills.

    Personally I'd try the 50 every Saturday. For the first try consider doing 25 or so as an "out and
    back" to your house, take a nice lunch break and then do another "out and back." But don't worry
    about speed.

    Tom Gibb <[email protected]
     
  3. Gary Smiley

    Gary Smiley Guest

    You'll be fine. Just remember to bring some snacks and/or sports drinks, as well as enough water.
    After a few hours you will have used up all your stores of glycogen and you will run out of energy
    fast if you don't eat an occasional snack. And don't try to ride faster than your ability - don't
    try to keep up with other riders who ride faster than you do. Find your own pace, and stick with it.
    Good luck!

    Tim B wrote:

    > I've only been riding my road bike for about a month. I ride 20-25 miles daily, all on a rail
    > trail bike path. Only about 11.5 mph average but it gets the job done. There's a century ride 6
    > weeks from now near me, billed as a flat-to-rolling tour with lots of support and not a race. They
    > stop 5 times during the 100.
    >
    > It seems to me that if I can ride 25 in the morning and be ok to go to work afterwards without a
    > lot of noticeable pain, I should be able to have a goal of doing 20 five times in a row with
    > rest breaks in between and be fine. They have 10, 25, and 50 mile options, and I could bail from
    > the 100 to the 50 midway if I wanted to. I'm 44 without any health problems I can think of other
    > than being about 250 pounds and that's coming off nicely with the nice calorie expenditure from
    > cycling. And thinking about the century gives me a nice, seemly unattainable goal, and that
    > works for me. Within a couple of weeks I'll have appropriate shorts, shoes and shirts; the bike
    > was expensive enough (Specialized Sequoia Sport, love it) that I skimped on the extras for the
    > first month.
    >
    > Here's my questions.
    >
    > 1. Am I nuts for thinking I can do this? My first inclination is to get a physical and explain
    > what I'm up to, and presuming there's not a big problem there, go on.
    >
    > 2. If it seems ok, how can I train for this? My first inclination is to do a 50 every couple of
    > weeks on the rail trail, not early in the morning but later on in the day, 25 miles slightly
    > uphill along a river, 25 miles back slightly downhill, and if that is comfortably achievable,
    > go on and do the tour. Then in the days in between, work on getting up to about 14 mph, as it
    > looks like from the brochure that they figure about that, and work on rolling hills.
     
  4. "Tim B" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > 2. If it seems ok, how can I train for this? My first inclination is to
    do
    > a 50 every couple of weeks on the rail trail, not early in the morning
    but
    > later on in the day, 25 miles slightly uphill along a river, 25 miles
    back
    > slightly downhill, and if that is comfortably achievable, go on and do
    the
    > tour. Then in the days in between, work on getting up to about 14 mph,
    as
    > it looks like from the brochure that they figure about that, and work on rolling hills.
    >

    Many people find it possible to double their normal ride distance. Your plan seems good. I'd try to
    ride a 50 miler once a week and at some point I'd try to get in a 65/70 mile ride. One long ride and
    one short ride plus several short easy rides per week is a good training. Racers vary their workouts
    between long slower endurance rides, short fast rides and easy rest rides. Don't do a long ride
    within a week of the event, do short rides. About 4/5 days before the event do a short fast ride.
    Also I would recommend doing some rides on the road. You should have good traffic skills (and
    tolerance).
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>, Tim B <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I've only been riding my road bike for about a month. I ride 20-25 miles daily, all on a rail trail
    >bike path. Only about 11.5 mph average but it gets the job done. There's a century ride 6 weeks
    >from now near me, billed as a flat-to-rolling tour with lots of support and not a race. They stop 5
    >times during the 100.
    >
    >It seems to me that if I can ride 25 in the morning and be ok to go to work afterwards without a
    >lot of noticeable pain, I should be able to have a goal of doing 20 five times in a row with rest
    >breaks in between and be fine. They have 10, 25, and 50 mile options, and I could bail from the 100
    >to the 50 midway if I wanted to. I'm 44 without any health problems I can think of other than being
    >about 250 pounds and that's coming off nicely with the nice calorie expenditure from cycling. And
    >thinking about the century gives me a nice, seemly unattainable goal, and that works for me. Within
    >a couple of weeks I'll have appropriate shorts, shoes and shirts; the bike was expensive enough
    >(Specialized Sequoia Sport, love it) that I skimped on the extras for the first month.
    >
    >Here's my questions.
    >
    >1. Am I nuts for thinking I can do this? My first inclination is to get a physical and explain
    > what I'm up to, and presuming there's not a big problem there, go on.

    I think you can do it, but at 50 miles you will probably be sore and it will take considerable
    discipline to complete the 100. If you can stay comfortable on the bike you will certainly make it.

    >2. If it seems ok, how can I train for this? My first inclination is to do a 50 every couple of
    > weeks on the rail trail, not early in the morning but later on in the day, 25 miles slightly
    > uphill along a river, 25 miles back slightly downhill, and if that is comfortably achievable,
    > go on and do the tour. Then in the days in between, work on getting up to about 14 mph, as it
    > looks like from the brochure that they figure about that, and work on rolling hills.

    I would do one longer ride each weekend between now and the event, start with 35-40 (a bit more than
    your daily ride) and make it a little longer each week by 5-10 miles. If this makes you tired the
    following day, skip the next ride and get more sleep.

    Riding faster is not very important to completing a century, but 14mph should be achievable for
    most people.
     
  6. Another thing... a 100 mile ride is NOT five 20-mile rides strung together. I can easily go 20 miles
    without eating. If it's not too hot, I can do it without drinking, too. Don't THINK of trying that
    on a 100 mile ride. Learning how much to eat and drink is one of the keys to long distance riding.

    I would urge you to try longer rides and I would consider 50 miles to be extremely minimal. You
    would be better served by riding 60-70 miles.

    And, as another poster mentioned, get off the trail and onto the road.

    Good luck to you!

    larry
    --
    To reply by e-mail, be polite. Rudeness will get you nowhere.
     
  7. Grindstone

    Grindstone Guest

    I don't have a lot to add to the other posters' advice........which I agree....i.e., "go for it."
    The one additional suggestiion I'll throw in is ...........while I'm not recommending you grossly
    overdo it; I do suggest your approaching it as "I'm gonna finish what I started" ......i.e, don't
    think of the "safety valve" of cutting it short ...........if you do, you'll likely do just that as
    soon as you get a little tired/sore (which you surely will). For me, it was a thrill I'll never
    forget......completing my first century (and each of them after that!). Good luck to you. "Tim B"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I've only been riding my road bike for about a month. I ride 20-25 miles daily, all on a rail
    > trail bike path. Only about 11.5 mph average but it gets the job done. There's a century ride 6
    > weeks from now near me,
    billed
    > as a flat-to-rolling tour with lots of support and not a race. They
    stop
    > 5 times during the 100.
    >
    > It seems to me that if I can ride 25 in the morning and be ok to go to
    work
    > afterwards without a lot of noticeable pain, I should be able to have a
    goal
    > of doing 20 five times in a row with rest breaks in between and be fine. They have 10, 25, and 50
    > mile options, and I could bail from the 100 to
    the
    > 50 midway if I wanted to. I'm 44 without any health problems I can think
    of
    > other than being about 250 pounds and that's coming off nicely with the
    nice
    > calorie expenditure from cycling. And thinking about the century gives me
    a
    > nice, seemly unattainable goal, and that works for me. Within a couple of weeks I'll have
    > appropriate shorts, shoes and shirts; the bike was
    expensive
    > enough (Specialized Sequoia Sport, love it) that I skimped on the extras
    for
    > the first month.
    >
    > Here's my questions.
    >
    > 1. Am I nuts for thinking I can do this? My first inclination is to get
    a
    > physical and explain what I'm up to, and presuming there's not a big
    problem
    > there, go on.
    >
    > 2. If it seems ok, how can I train for this? My first inclination is to
    do
    > a 50 every couple of weeks on the rail trail, not early in the morning but later on in the day, 25
    > miles slightly uphill along a river, 25 miles back slightly downhill, and if that is comfortably
    > achievable, go on and do the tour. Then in the days in between, work on getting up to about 14
    > mph, as it looks like from the brochure that they figure about that, and work on rolling hills.
     
  8. Tim B

    Tim B Guest

    Yes I have been busy on eBay finding shorts and a jersey.

    "amh" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "Tim B" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > I've only been riding my road bike for about a month. I ride 20-25
    miles
    > > daily, all on a rail trail bike path. Only about 11.5 mph average but
    it
    > > gets the job done. There's a century ride 6 weeks from now near me,
    billed
    > > as a flat-to-rolling tour with lots of support and not a race. They
    stop
    > > 5 times during the 100.
    > >
    > > It seems to me that if I can ride 25 in the morning and be ok to go to
    work
    > > afterwards without a lot of noticeable pain, I should be able to have a
    goal
    > > of doing 20 five times in a row with rest breaks in between and be fine. They have 10, 25, and
    > > 50 mile options, and I could bail from the 100 to
    the
    > > 50 midway if I wanted to. I'm 44 without any health problems I can
    think of
    > > other than being about 250 pounds and that's coming off nicely with the
    nice
    > > calorie expenditure from cycling. And thinking about the century gives
    me a
    > > nice, seemly unattainable goal, and that works for me. Within a couple
    of
    > > weeks I'll have appropriate shorts, shoes and shirts; the bike was
    expensive
    > > enough (Specialized Sequoia Sport, love it) that I skimped on the extras
    for
    > > the first month.
    > >
    > > Here's my questions.
    > >
    > > 1. Am I nuts for thinking I can do this? My first inclination is to
    get a
    > > physical and explain what I'm up to, and presuming there's not a big
    problem
    > > there, go on.
    >
    > Yeah a little nuts.
    >
    > >
    > > 2. If it seems ok, how can I train for this? My first inclination is
    to do
    > > a 50 every couple of weeks on the rail trail, not early in the morning
    but
    > > later on in the day, 25 miles slightly uphill along a river, 25 miles
    back
    > > slightly downhill, and if that is comfortably achievable, go on and do
    the
    > > tour. Then in the days in between, work on getting up to about 14 mph,
    as
    > > it looks like from the brochure that they figure about that, and work on rolling hills.
    >
    > If the route is well supported you shoudln't have too much trouble. Take a long break at the feed
    > stations. Your training sounds like it will get you to the finish as long as you don't race. It
    > will really help you to find a group you can train with or at least ride the century with.
    >
    > But one thing GET COMFORTABLE SHORTS NOW! It will be too late in a few weeks. You want to get what
    > works for you. In order to do that it will require some experimenting. Or you may get lucky and
    > find a pair of shorts you can wear for over 10 hours of riding.
    >
    > enjoy the ride, Andy
     
  9. Shl

    Shl Guest

    Here's my experience. YMMV. 2+ years ago mid March I quit my job, bought a road bike, trained 2
    months and did my first century in mid-May. I did 20 mile rides about 5 times a week, mostly as hard
    as I can go and a couple of weeks before the century I did a 35-40 mile ride. About 30 miles into
    the century I felt good about finishing...at about 50 the thighs, calves started to hurt...took a
    length lunch break and stretched the thighs, calves really well and everything after that was fine
    and I finished in under 8 hours. I did ride it with an experienced rider and he was good in pacing
    the ride (we took ~10 minute breaks every 20+ miles or so) and I thought that really helped. Looking
    back that was a little nuts...but I do rollerblade and hike a lot so maybe that helped...

    -shl

    "Tim B" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I've only been riding my road bike for about a month. I ride 20-25 miles daily, all on a rail
    > trail bike path. Only about 11.5 mph average but it gets the job done. There's a century ride 6
    > weeks from now near me,
    billed
    > as a flat-to-rolling tour with lots of support and not a race. They
    stop
    > 5 times during the 100.
    >
    > It seems to me that if I can ride 25 in the morning and be ok to go to
    work
    > afterwards without a lot of noticeable pain, I should be able to have a
    goal
    > of doing 20 five times in a row with rest breaks in between and be fine. They have 10, 25, and 50
    > mile options, and I could bail from the 100 to
    the
    > 50 midway if I wanted to. I'm 44 without any health problems I can think
    of
    > other than being about 250 pounds and that's coming off nicely with the
    nice
    > calorie expenditure from cycling. And thinking about the century gives me
    a
    > nice, seemly unattainable goal, and that works for me. Within a couple of weeks I'll have
    > appropriate shorts, shoes and shirts; the bike was
    expensive
    > enough (Specialized Sequoia Sport, love it) that I skimped on the extras
    for
    > the first month.
    >
    > Here's my questions.
    >
    > 1. Am I nuts for thinking I can do this? My first inclination is to get
    a
    > physical and explain what I'm up to, and presuming there's not a big
    problem
    > there, go on.
    >
    > 2. If it seems ok, how can I train for this? My first inclination is to
    do
    > a 50 every couple of weeks on the rail trail, not early in the morning but later on in the day, 25
    > miles slightly uphill along a river, 25 miles back slightly downhill, and if that is comfortably
    > achievable, go on and do the tour. Then in the days in between, work on getting up to about 14
    > mph, as it looks like from the brochure that they figure about that, and work on rolling hills.
     
  10. Bill Artz

    Bill Artz Guest

    I just finished a 2 day MS ride of 75 miles each day. I was a bit nervous about doing 75 miles for
    one day much less two. My prior experience was a couple fo 50 mile one day rides.

    You need to do as posters have suggestted and build your endurance by gradually riding longer
    distances over a 2 month timeframe. I suggest starting at 35 -40 , then do a 50 mile or so and a 65
    mile ride a couple of weeks befor ethe century. ALso, ride a few shorter rides during the week.. I
    happened to ride twice a week to work which was 36 miles round trip. Shorts are critical as well as
    gloves. YOu have to be comfortable being in the saddle for a long time. Also, stop at the rest
    stops, drink enough so that you have to go to the bathroom at every stop. It is a good measure of
    knowing you are well hydrated. Drink both water and gatorade. The gatorade/powerade has potassium
    and sodium to rebalance what you lose sweating. Snacking is also important. Generally supported
    rides have plenty of fruit as well as cookies, pbjs etc. HAVE FUN! "Tim B" <[email protected]> wrote
    in message news:[email protected]...
    > I've only been riding my road bike for about a month. I ride 20-25 miles daily, all on a rail
    > trail bike path. Only about 11.5 mph average but it gets the job done. There's a century ride 6
    > weeks from now near me,
    billed
    > as a flat-to-rolling tour with lots of support and not a race. They
    stop
    > 5 times during the 100.
    >
    > It seems to me that if I can ride 25 in the morning and be ok to go to
    work
    > afterwards without a lot of noticeable pain, I should be able to have a
    goal
    > of doing 20 five times in a row with rest breaks in between and be fine. They have 10, 25, and 50
    > mile options, and I could bail from the 100 to
    the
    > 50 midway if I wanted to. I'm 44 without any health problems I can think
    of
    > other than being about 250 pounds and that's coming off nicely with the
    nice
    > calorie expenditure from cycling. And thinking about the century gives me
    a
    > nice, seemly unattainable goal, and that works for me. Within a couple of weeks I'll have
    > appropriate shorts, shoes and shirts; the bike was
    expensive
    > enough (Specialized Sequoia Sport, love it) that I skimped on the extras
    for
    > the first month.
    >
    > Here's my questions.
    >
    > 1. Am I nuts for thinking I can do this? My first inclination is to get
    a
    > physical and explain what I'm up to, and presuming there's not a big
    problem
    > there, go on.
    >
    > 2. If it seems ok, how can I train for this? My first inclination is to
    do
    > a 50 every couple of weeks on the rail trail, not early in the morning but later on in the day, 25
    > miles slightly uphill along a river, 25 miles back slightly downhill, and if that is comfortably
    > achievable, go on and do the tour. Then in the days in between, work on getting up to about 14
    > mph, as it looks like from the brochure that they figure about that, and work on rolling hills.
     
  11. Raptor

    Raptor Guest

    Tim B wrote:
    > Here's my questions.
    >
    > 1. Am I nuts for thinking I can do this? My first inclination is to get a physical and explain
    > what I'm up to, and presuming there's not a big problem there, go on.
    >
    > 2. If it seems ok, how can I train for this? My first inclination is to do a 50 every couple of
    > weeks on the rail trail, not early in the morning but later on in the day, 25 miles slightly
    > uphill along a river, 25 miles back slightly downhill, and if that is comfortably achievable,
    > go on and do the tour. Then in the days in between, work on getting up to about 14 mph, as it
    > looks like from the brochure that they figure about that, and work on rolling hills.

    Good advice from others. I agree with the person who said you're slightly nuts.:) But it's just
    riding a bike for a whole day-ish. If you can do over an hour with no trouble, you've probably
    eliminated the usual health issues that would otherwise interfere. Properly fueling and caring for
    your body should get you through. (IANADoctor and it would be foolish to suggest against seeing one
    before hand.)

    There's a rec.bicycle FAQ available on the subject of preparing for your first century. I hope you
    can find it with a search.

    I did a century in May that was 3.5X longer than my previous long ride of the year. Weather limited
    long rides earlier. I was working out hard in gyms, but those are 4 hour or less workouts with
    varied activity, not on a bike.

    While riding, eat more than you think you need to, and drink the same. Make sure you drink a large
    proportion (half, maybe) of sport drinks to replenish electrolytes. Eat a lot of the quick energy
    simple carbohydrate stuff (energy bars), but your stomach may want you to also give it some "real"
    food - mine does. So maybe pack one of your usual treats along, maybe a couple small pieces of beef
    jerky, celery sticks, an actual candy bar, a small filet if you can keep it edible. :) If you're in
    the sun, keep your sunscreen fresh!

    It was a cool day for me, and I therefore didn't drink enough. Fortunately I shared a 50-mile rest
    break with a massage therapist who rubbed my legs for me and told me the muscles felt dehydrated.
    (So that's what that particular flavor of achiness means...) I pounded Gatorade after that and felt
    much better.

    One tactic that works for me is to hitch up with trains of other riders as they pass, ride their
    wheel (try to pull your share), then sit up when the pace feels too hot and wait for the next one. I
    did my 105 miles in 5:40 that way. I was extremely saddle sore and my hands ached afterwards. I did
    manage 25-26mph for the last mile though, to properly honor the effort.

    Let us know how it goes. If you manage the whole 100, you'll be justifiably very proud. Don't let
    those yahoos who do double and triple centuries cool your fire. :)

    --
    --
    Lynn Wallace http://www.xmission.com/~lawall "I'm not proud. We really haven't done everything we
    could to protect our customers. Our products just aren't engineered for security." --Microsoft VP in
    charge of Windows OS Development, Brian Valentine.
     
  12. Mrdna

    Mrdna Guest

    Water, water, water.

    More water.

    Start very early in the morning, before daylight if possible.

    Eat a huge, high fat, no carb breakfast.

    More water

    Bring toilet paper.

    Don't eat carbs on the ride, they will screw up your liver and make you hungry and tired.

    Ride out 50 miles and coast back.

    You will achieve your goal.

    ;) Markgo

    "Tim B" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I've only been riding my road bike for about a month. I ride 20-25 miles daily, all on a rail
    > trail bike path. Only about 11.5 mph average but it gets the job done. There's a century ride 6
    > weeks from now near me,
    billed
    > as a flat-to-rolling tour with lots of support and not a race. They
    stop
    > 5 times during the 100.
    >
    > It seems to me that if I can ride 25 in the morning and be ok to go to
    work
    > afterwards without a lot of noticeable pain, I should be able to have a
    goal
    > of doing 20 five times in a row with rest breaks in between and be fine. They have 10, 25, and 50
    > mile options, and I could bail from the 100 to
    the
    > 50 midway if I wanted to. I'm 44 without any health problems I can think
    of
    > other than being about 250 pounds and that's coming off nicely with the
    nice
    > calorie expenditure from cycling. And thinking about the century gives me
    a
    > nice, seemly unattainable goal, and that works for me. Within a couple of weeks I'll have
    > appropriate shorts, shoes and shirts; the bike was
    expensive
    > enough (Specialized Sequoia Sport, love it) that I skimped on the extras
    for
    > the first month.
    >
    > Here's my questions.
    >
    > 1. Am I nuts for thinking I can do this? My first inclination is to get
    a
    > physical and explain what I'm up to, and presuming there's not a big
    problem
    > there, go on.
    >
    > 2. If it seems ok, how can I train for this? My first inclination is to
    do
    > a 50 every couple of weeks on the rail trail, not early in the morning but later on in the day, 25
    > miles slightly uphill along a river, 25 miles back slightly downhill, and if that is comfortably
    > achievable, go on and do the tour. Then in the days in between, work on getting up to about 14
    > mph, as it looks like from the brochure that they figure about that, and work on rolling hills.
     
  13. Jerry Lipsky

    Jerry Lipsky Guest

    Say what???

    High fat, no carbs before a ride? I've been riding for years, have done a number of centuries and
    several 7-day 400+ mile rides. I'd never think of riding without some carbs. Where do you think the
    glycogen used by muscles comes from?

    I've been known to do a power bar for breakfast and then lots of fruit (full of fructose, a carb) at
    every other rest stop. Sugars do nont last very long...neither do powerade/gatorade. However, for a
    century, I'll start off with a few bagels, a pancake breakfast or something else with lots of carbs
    to hold me for the long haul.

    BTW, I don't go near sports drinks...sugar water may be good for hummingbirds but not people. I get
    my electrolytes through bananas and other fruits...and don't worry about tooth decay.

    jerry

    "mrdna" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Water, water, water.
    >
    > More water.
    >
    > Start very early in the morning, before daylight if possible.
    >
    > Eat a huge, high fat, no carb breakfast.
    >
    > More water
    >
    > Bring toilet paper.
    >
    > Don't eat carbs on the ride, they will screw up your liver and make you hungry and tired.
    >
    > Ride out 50 miles and coast back.
    >
    > You will achieve your goal.
    >
    > ;) Markgo
     
  14. Nobodyman

    Nobodyman Guest

    On 2 Jul 2003 12:35:59 -0700, [email protected] (Jerry Lipsky) wrote:

    >High fat, no carbs before a ride? I've been riding for years, have done a number of centuries and
    >several 7-day 400+ mile rides. I'd never think of riding without some carbs. Where do you think the
    >glycogen used by muscles comes from?

    Well, the liver stores a limited amount of glycogen. The body can also convert fat for use as
    energy - and the same amount of fat provides more energy than glycogen, though the conversion
    isn't as clean.

    There are people who do the Atkins diet, taking little to NO carbs, and still manage to ride very
    well (in the 18-20 mph average speed range consistently). I've even done it once just to see if
    it was true - and after two weeks on ZERO carbs I was riding as well as I was ingesting carbs. It
    can be done.

    Now as to whether it's healthy, that's still a matter of great debate.
     
  15. Dan

    Dan Guest

    Tim,

    I agree that you can do it just fine, if you train. I'm in the school of thought that says you
    should gradually build up your miles. I'd jump to 40, then 55, then about 70 on succeeding weekends,
    and do shorter rides during the week. If you can do 65 or 70, you can do 100.

    Practice riding on the road, in the rain, and in the wind, so that those things won't faze you. As
    another poster said, plan to finish the ride, and concentrate on how good you'll feel at the finish.

    I'm a contrarian on one point. I try to keep my rest breaks fairly short when I'm riding a century,
    except perhaps for a longer lunch break. If I stop for longer than 15 or 20 minutes, I find that my
    legs get stiff and sore. If I ride at a moderate pace, and take short breaks, I do better. Besides,
    if you stop 5 times for 30 minutes each, that's 2 & 1/2 hours that you'll be stopped.

    Good luck, have fun, and let us know how it goes!

    Dan
     
  16. Raptor

    Raptor Guest

    I thought the advice to go low-carb high fat was a joke.

    Dan wrote:
    > I'm a contrarian on one point. I try to keep my rest breaks fairly short when I'm riding a
    > century, except perhaps for a longer lunch break. If I stop for longer than 15 or 20 minutes, I
    > find that my legs get stiff and sore. If I ride at a moderate pace, and take short breaks, I do
    > better. Besides, if you stop 5 times for 30 minutes each, that's 2 & 1/2 hours that you'll be
    > stopped.

    Those sound about right to me. Just long enough to refuel and rearm, then back on the road.

    --
    --
    Lynn Wallace http://www.xmission.com/~lawall "I'm not proud. We really haven't done everything we
    could to protect our customers. Our products just aren't engineered for security." --Microsoft VP in
    charge of Windows OS Development, Brian Valentine.
     
  17. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Wed, 02 Jul 2003 20:28:35 -0600, Raptor <[email protected]> from XMission
    http://www.xmission.com/ wrote:

    >I thought the advice to go low-carb high fat was a joke.
    >
    >Dan wrote:
    >> I'm a contrarian on one point. I try to keep my rest breaks fairly short when I'm riding a
    >> century, except perhaps for a longer lunch break. If I stop for longer than 15 or 20 minutes, I
    >> find that my legs get stiff and sore. If I ride at a moderate pace, and take short breaks, I do
    >> better. Besides, if you stop 5 times for 30 minutes each, that's 2 & 1/2 hours that you'll be
    >> stopped.
    >
    >Those sound about right to me. Just long enough to refuel and rearm, then back on the road.

    Rest on a century? Why? It's only 100 miles! :)

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace Should I start with the time I SWITCHED
    personalities with a BEATNIK hair stylist or my failure to refer five TEENAGERS to a good OCULIST?
    9:43:57 PM 2 July 2003
     
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