First Flat, Lessons Learned

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Naveed Aziz Nea, Jun 30, 2003.

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  1. I have been commuting to work for about 3 months now. I hadn't ridden since i was a kid before that.
    I have read through the newsgroups, The FAQS and Sheldon's Website.

    I have learned alot, done a lot of riding, gone to a maintenance clinicn and gotten good information
    from all of these sources. As you all know, experience is often the best teacher.

    Today I had my first flat. I learned a few things from it.

    1. Get a good pump. Something that can go to a high pressure.
    2. Remember to close the top of your water bottle before flipping your bike over.
    3. Kevlar will not stop a chocolate chip shaped metal spike.
    4. Mr. Tuffy liners are probably worth the price.
    5. Riding with low pressure is much more difficult than it seems.
    6. If you have a fancy leather saddle (I.E. Brooks), make sure to put something to protect it from
    scratches before flipping the bike over onto the cement.

    ------------------
    Naveed Near-Ansari I speak for myself
    ------------------
     
    Tags:


  2. Fritz M

    Fritz M Guest

    "Naveed Aziz Near-Ansari" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > 2. Remember to close the top of your water bottle before flipping your bike over.

    *laugh* Good one!

    > 6. If you have a fancy leather saddle (I.E. Brooks), make sure to put something to protect it
    > from scratches before flipping the bike over onto the cement.

    I typically just lay my bike over after taking the affected wheel off.

    Thanks for the list!

    RFM
    --
    To reply, translate domain from l33+ 2p33|< to alpha. 4=a 0=o 3=e +=t
     
  3. Pat

    Pat Guest

    x-no-archive:yes

    > 1. Get a good pump. Something that can go to a high pressure.

    I really like my Topeak Road Morph. You might try it.

    > 3. Kevlar will not stop a chocolate chip shaped metal spike.

    It also won't stop a goathead grassbur.

    > 4. Mr. Tuffy liners are probably worth the price.

    Buy the imitation "Mr. Tuffy" (less expensive) and, of course, put them in by yourself. It's not
    difficult.

    > 5. Riding with low pressure is much more difficult than it seems.

    How low?

    > 6. If you have a fancy leather saddle (I.E. Brooks), make sure to put something to protect it
    > from scratches before flipping the bike over onto the cement.

    Good advice.

    Pat
     
  4. On Mon, 30 Jun 2003 18:15:02 -0500, Pat wrote:

    >
    >> 1. Get a good pump. Something that can go to a high pressure.
    >
    > I really like my Topeak Road Morph. You might try it.

    This is a an ATB bike with slicks. The rated pressue is 45-75 PSI. I looked at the topeak morphline
    and am considering one. Is there any reason why I should get the ATB version of it over the road
    version. It seems that the more pressure you can get with it, the more versatile it
    is. I was also thinking about a frame pump. Thoughts?

    >> 3. Kevlar will not stop a chocolate chip shaped metal spike.
    >
    > It also won't stop a goathead grassbur.

    Or nails or... That's why combined with some liners they should be good for my commuter.

    >> 4. Mr. Tuffy liners are probably worth the price.
    >
    > Buy the imitation "Mr. Tuffy" (less expensive) and, of course, put them in by yourself. It's not
    > difficult.

    my LBS only seemed to have the name brand version

    >> 5. Riding with low pressure is much more difficult than it seems.
    >
    > How low?

    45 PSI

    >> 6. If you have a fancy leather saddle (I.E. Brooks), make sure to put something to protect it
    >> from scratches before flipping the bike over onto the cement.
    >
    > Good advice.
    >
    > Pat

    Now if only i can find some kind of insulated coffe cup that fits in a bottle cage, and a pair of
    shoes that don't look ridiculous to work and walk around in, my bicyle commutg experience will be
    just about perfect.

    ------------------
    Naveed Near-Ansari I speak for myself
    ------------------
     
  5. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Naveed Aziz Near-Ansari" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...

    > 6. If you have a fancy leather saddle (I.E. Brooks), make sure to put something to protect it
    > from scratches before flipping the bike over onto the cement.

    No need to ever put your bike on its back. It's pretty hard on a lot of things. As a matter of fact,
    you don't even need to remove your wheel to fix a flat, but even if you do, just lay the bike down
    after you get it out.
     
  6. Pat

    Pat Guest

    x-no-archive:yes

    > >> 1. Get a good pump. Something that can go to a high pressure.
    > >
    > > I really like my Topeak Road Morph. You might try it.
    >
    > This is a an ATB bike with slicks. The rated pressue is 45-75 PSI. I looked at the topeak
    > morphline and am considering one. Is there any reason why I should get the ATB version of it over
    > the road version. It seems that the more pressure you can get with it, the more versatile it
    > is. I was also thinking about a frame pump. Thoughts?

    Read the small print in the advertisements or maybe on the web site. I seem to remember that the
    Topeak Morph Mountain pump does not come with a gauge whereas the Road Morph does. They may have
    changed since I bought mine in 2001, though. Also, I noticed today several imitations out there--one
    by Blackburn, one by Serfas and who knows who else....this pump comes with a frame mount. You might
    look for reviews, esp. at www.mtreview.com or www.roadbikereview.com

    Pat
     
  7. On Mon, 30 Jun 2003 15:25:18 +0000, Naveed Aziz Near-Ansari wrote:

    >
    > I have been commuting to work for about 3 months now. I hadn't ridden since i was a kid before
    > that. I have read through the newsgroups, The FAQS and Sheldon's Website.
    >
    > I have learned alot, done a lot of riding, gone to a maintenance clinicn and gotten good
    > information from all of these sources. As you all know, experience is often the best teacher.
    >
    > Today I had my first flat. I learned a few things from it.
    >
    > 1. Get a good pump. Something that can go to a high pressure.

    Definitely

    > 2. Remember to close the top of your water bottle before flipping your bike over.

    No need to flip the bike over.

    > 3. Kevlar will not stop a chocolate chip shaped metal spike.

    True

    > 4. Mr. Tuffy liners are probably worth the price.

    Doubtful. Mr. Tuffy will not stop a chocolate chip shaped metal spike, either.

    > 6. If you have a fancy leather saddle (I.E. Brooks), make sure to put something to protect it
    > from scratches before flipping the bike over onto the cement.

    See my comment above.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | "What am I on? I'm on my bike, six hours a day, busting my ass. _`\(,_ | What are you on?"
    --Lance Armstrong (_)/ (_) |
     
  8. Pat

    Pat Guest

    > x-no-archive:yes

    whoops! that's www.mtbreview.com Sorry about that.
    >
    >
    > Pat
     
  9. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Naveed Aziz Near-Ansari"
    <[email protected]> writes:

    > Today I had my first flat. I learned a few things from it.
    >
    > 1. Get a good pump. Something that can go to a high pressure.

    I pack /two/ portable pumps. One for my own, personal use. And oneto lend to moochers on the
    wayside, who insist on doing their own pumping, but treat the pump really roughly.

    The pump I keep for myself is an aluminum barreled Planet Bike unit. The loaner is one of those
    plastic barreled dual-piston jobbies that occasionally blow up in your hands.

    I've got a spare chain tool, too.

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  10. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

  11. Fritz M

    Fritz M Guest

    "Naveed Aziz Near-Ansari" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> It also won't stop a goathead grassbur.
    >
    > Or nails or... That's why combined with some liners they should be good for my commuter.

    I could generally count on getting a flat at least every two weeks, but then I started using
    heavy-duty tubes last year. Since then, I haven't had a single flat in spite of the goatheads and
    broken glass on my commute. I haven't run over any metal spikes lately.

    RFM
    --
    To reply, translate domain from l33+ 2p33|< to alpha. 4=a 0=o 3=e +=t
     
  12. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Tom Keats" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>,

    > I pack /two/ portable pumps. One for my own, personal use. And oneto lend to moochers on the
    > wayside, who insist on doing their own pumping, but treat the pump really roughly.
    >
    > I've got a spare chain tool, too.

    I *never* let anyone use my pump. The few people I have rescued w/o a pump seem to have little idea
    how to use one.

    I found a guy walking barefoot last year (fortunately it was summer) since his Campy C-10 chain
    snapped & he had no tools. After I removed the broken link, he asked to use the tool to do the
    joining himself. I was reluctant, but then considered that I really didn't want to be responsible
    for the security of the join, so I let him have the honors.
     
  13. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Tue, 01 Jul 2003 00:42:06 -0700, Zoot Katz <[email protected]> from Balsa Pacific Aero Ltd.
    Engineering & Bicycle Mongery wrote:

    >There are several of them listed here: http://www.bicyclecoffeesystems.com

    Dang, Zoot, you have a bike link for EVERYTHING.

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace Mary Tyler Moore's SEVENTH HUSBAND is wearing
    my DACRON TANK TOP in a cheap hotel in HONOLULU!
    2:27:43 PM 1 July 2003
     
  14. Naveed

    Naveed Guest

  15. Fritz M

    Fritz M Guest

    "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> I've got a spare chain tool, too.

    > After I removed the broken link, he asked to use the tool to do the joining himself. I was
    > reluctant,

    At the risk of sounding dumb: How can the chain tool be damaged?

    RFM
    --
    To reply, translate domain from l33+ 2p33|< to alpha. 4=a 0=o 3=e +=t
     
  16. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Fritz M <[email protected]+> writes:
    > "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>> I've got a spare chain tool, too.
    >
    >> After I removed the broken link, he asked to use the tool to do the joining himself. I was
    >> reluctant,
    >
    > At the risk of sounding dumb: How can the chain tool be damaged?

    By not aligning it properly on the chain's pin, and forcing the pin-driving "anvil" of the tool
    against a sideplate. The result is stripped threads and/or a bent driver pin.

    This is just my opinion:

    I've had the more expensive, and the cheaper chain tools. And I've dealt with (and learned from)
    tool-moochers in the past, who's destructiveness would probably make them good beta-testers. I don't
    like the materials (i.e: brass) in either of the two predominant makers of chain tools.

    Might as well go with the cheaper tool, unless you can find one with a nice, hard, unwarpable,
    drop-forged steel body and a slightly milder steel core. Metals with differing hardnesses wearing
    against each other wear the least. And brass construction sux in chain tools. And all chrome-plating
    does, is increase cost and make it look prettier than it needs to be.

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Ah has spoke! -- Mammy Yokum Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats
    [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  17. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Tom Keats" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]h.edu>,

    > I pack /two/ portable pumps. One for my own, personal use. And oneto lend to moochers on the
    > wayside, who insist on doing their own pumping, but treat the pump really roughly.
    >
    > I've got a spare chain tool, too.

    I *never* let anyone use my pump. The few people I have rescued w/o a pump seem to have little idea
    how to use one.

    I found a guy walking barefoot last year (fortunately it was summer) since his Campy C-10 chain
    snapped & he had no tools. After I removed the broken link, he asked to use the tool to do the
    joining himself. I was reluctant, but then considered that I really didn't want to be responsible
    for the security of the join, so I let him have the honors.
     
  18. "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "Naveed Aziz Near-Ansari" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]...
    >
    > > 6. If you have a fancy leather saddle (I.E. Brooks), make sure to put something to protect it
    > > from scratches before flipping the bike over
    onto
    > > the cement.
    >
    > No need to ever put your bike on its back. It's pretty hard on a lot of things. As a matter of
    > fact, you don't even need to remove your wheel to
    fix a
    > flat, but even if you do, just lay the bike down after you get it out.

    Ok, how do you fix a flat tire without removing the tube?
     
  19. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > "Naveed Aziz Near-Ansari" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:p[email protected]...
    > >
    > > > 6. If you have a fancy leather saddle (I.E. Brooks), make sure to put something to protect it
    > > > from scratches before flipping the bike over
    > onto
    > > > the cement.
    > >
    > > No need to ever put your bike on its back. It's pretty hard on a lot of things. As a matter of
    > > fact, you don't even need to remove your wheel to
    > fix a
    > > flat, but even if you do, just lay the bike down after you get it out.
    >
    >
    > Ok, how do you fix a flat tire without removing the tube?

    Just pull out the section with the hole and patch it, then stuff it back into place.

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  20. In article <[email protected]>, Fritz M <[email protected]+> wrote:
    >"Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>> I've got a spare chain tool, too.
    >
    >> After I removed the broken link, he asked to use the tool to do the joining himself. I was
    >> reluctant,
    >
    >At the risk of sounding dumb: How can the chain tool be damaged?

    Bending the pin is the most common way of damaging a chain tool in my experience.
     
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