First progress report

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Debbie, Feb 8, 2004.

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  1. Debbie

    Debbie Guest

    Thanks to all for encouragement to start cycling again after 15 years.

    Today was day 1. Best beloved very kindly gave over the whole afternoon to working with me in the
    kitchen to get the machine roadworthy. This involved buying lights - gosh, haven't they got pretty?
    - and a computer to tell me how far and fast I go, replacing tyres (one of the *new* ones came with
    an integrated puncture. Nasty cheap thai junk), tweaking brakes and raising the saddle (has my
    inside leg increased, or did I always ride with it too low before?)

    Then out for a spin. It was only a bit over a mile, and as we live at the very top of a hill, the
    first bit was easier than I expected. Coming home wasn't quite such a doddle, and I had to get off
    and walk about 20 yards, up two steep bits, because I just don't have a low enough gear to make it
    possible for flabby thighs to keep the bike moving. I suppose it was about 10 minutes in all, and I
    arrived home triumphant but with stiff legs and wobbly knees, puffing like a train and it took me
    half an hour to recover from the shock to the system. Talk about unfit! 5.8mph average speed isn't
    much better than a mollusc.

    But I did it, and I actually *enjoyed* it, and it wasn't any worse than I expected.

    --

    Debbie Urban Theology Unit, Sheffield Views expressed in this email are my own and are not
    necessarily those of the University of Sheffield or UTU.
     
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  2. \ Dave

    \ Dave Guest

    "Debbie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Thanks to all for encouragement to start cycling again after 15 years.
    >
    > Today was day 1. Best beloved very kindly gave over the whole afternoon to working with me in the
    > kitchen to get the machine roadworthy. This involved buying lights - gosh, haven't they got
    > pretty? - and a computer to tell me how far and fast I go, replacing tyres (one of the *new* ones
    > came with an integrated puncture. Nasty cheap thai junk), tweaking brakes and raising the saddle
    > (has my inside leg increased, or did I always ride with it too low before?)
    >
    > Then out for a spin. It was only a bit over a mile, and as we live at the very top of a hill, the
    > first bit was easier than I expected. Coming home wasn't quite such a doddle, and I had to get off
    > and walk about 20 yards, up two steep bits, because I just don't have a low enough gear to make it
    > possible for flabby thighs to keep the bike moving. I suppose it was about 10 minutes in all, and
    > I arrived home triumphant but with stiff legs and wobbly knees, puffing like a train and it took
    > me half an hour to recover from the shock to the system. Talk about unfit! 5.8mph average speed
    > isn't much better than a mollusc.
    >
    > But I did it, and I actually *enjoyed* it, and it wasn't any worse than I expected.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Debbie Urban Theology Unit, Sheffield Views expressed in this email are my own and are not
    > necessarily those of the University of Sheffield or UTU.

    Yay Deb!!! - gooo on!
     
  3. Graham

    Graham Guest

    "Debbie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Thanks to all for encouragement to start cycling again after 15 years.
    >
    > Today was day 1. Best beloved very kindly gave over the whole afternoon to working with me in the
    > kitchen to get the machine roadworthy. This involved buying lights - gosh, haven't they got
    > pretty? - and a computer to tell me how far and fast I go, replacing tyres (one of the *new* ones
    > came with an integrated puncture. Nasty cheap thai junk), tweaking brakes and raising the saddle
    > (has my inside leg increased, or did I always ride with it too low before?)
    >
    > Then out for a spin. It was only a bit over a mile, and as we live at the very top of a hill, the
    > first bit was easier than I expected. Coming home wasn't quite such a doddle, and I had to get off
    > and walk about 20 yards, up two steep bits, because I just don't have a low enough gear to make it
    > possible for flabby thighs to keep the bike moving. I suppose it was about 10 minutes in all, and
    > I arrived home triumphant but with stiff legs and wobbly knees, puffing like a train and it took
    > me half an hour to recover from the shock to the system. Talk about unfit! 5.8mph average speed
    > isn't much better than a mollusc.

    5.9 for your average mollusc I think ! Keep it up.

    Graham
    >
    > But I did it, and I actually *enjoyed* it, and it wasn't any worse than I expected.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Debbie Urban Theology Unit, Sheffield Views expressed in this email are my own and are not
    > necessarily those of the University of Sheffield or UTU.
     
  4. gemarc

    gemarc New Member

    Joined:
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    Well done keep it up.

    Do you live in Sheffield?

    If so there are some awesome rides in the Peak District.
     
  5. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    On Sun, 08 Feb 2004 23:16:31 +0000, Debbie
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Then out for a spin. It was only a bit over a mile, and as we live at the very top of a hill, the
    >first bit was easier than I expected. Coming home wasn't quite such a doddle, and I had to get off
    >and walk about 20 yards, up two steep bits, because I just don't have a low enough gear to make it
    >possible for flabby thighs to keep the bike moving.

    Living where you do, that bike is never going to be easy for you to pedal home. However, you do need
    gradually to build up your distance. Plan B therefore is to get off and push the moment the hills
    become too steep. Walking is also good exercise, and this will also extend your cycling time. Do not
    be embarrassed or apologetic about doing this. As you extend your range you will find it happening
    less and less, but it might still be a while before you roll up to your front door. When you get
    your new bike, however...

    > I suppose it was about 10 minutes in all, and I arrived home triumphant but with stiff legs and
    > wobbly knees, puffing like a train and it took me half an hour to recover from the shock to the
    > system. Talk about unfit! 5.8mph average speed isn't much better than a mollusc.

    Actually, for a heavy person unaccustomed to exercise on a heavy over-geared bike toiling up a steep
    hill, that speed is not at all bad. However, as I think I mentioned before, your speed is irrelevant
    at this stage. Also cycling uses your leg muscles quite differently from walking, and they will
    inevitably feel stiff, tired and "strange" the first few times.

    If you ask for directions in Dublin, the local sense of humour being what it is, you risk being
    told, "I wouldn't start from here." Like the visitor lost in Dublin, however, you have no choice.
    But you do need to get "there" eventually. Puffing like a train is not good. A _little_ out of
    breath and a _slightly_ elevated pulse over a steadily extending period is what you should be
    aiming for.

    >But I did it, and I actually *enjoyed* it, and it wasn't any worse than I expected.

    I'm proud of you.

    --
    Dave...

    Get a bicycle. You will not regret it. If you live. - Mark Twain
     
  6. Mseries

    Mseries Guest

    Debbie wrote:

    > But I did it, and I actually *enjoyed* it, and it wasn't any worse than I expected.

    Well done, you've made start. From small acorns and all that. There will be bad days but once you
    get home you'll quickly forget them - just think of the good ones.

    --
    The Reply & From email addresses are checked rarely. http://www.mseries.freeserve.co.uk
     
  7. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    , B

    (That's supposed to be a thumbs-up smiley, but I don't believe it)

    Well done. Remember, even the boy in the Hovis ad had to push up that hill.

    --
    Guy
    ===

    WARNING: may contain traces of irony. Contents may settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk "Debbie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Thanks to all for encouragement to start cycling again after 15 years.
    >
    > Today was day 1. Best beloved very kindly gave over the whole afternoon to working with me in the
    > kitchen to get the machine roadworthy. This involved buying lights - gosh, haven't they got
    > pretty? - and a computer to tell me how far and fast I go, replacing tyres (one of the *new* ones
    > came with an integrated puncture. Nasty cheap thai junk), tweaking brakes and raising the saddle
    > (has my inside leg increased, or did I always ride with it too low before?)
    >
    > Then out for a spin. It was only a bit over a mile, and as we live at the very top of a hill, the
    > first bit was easier than I expected. Coming home wasn't quite such a doddle, and I had to get off
    > and walk about 20 yards, up two steep bits, because I just don't have a low enough gear to make it
    > possible for flabby thighs to keep the bike moving. I suppose it was about 10 minutes in all, and
    > I arrived home triumphant but with stiff legs and wobbly knees, puffing like a train and it took
    > me half an hour to recover from the shock to the system. Talk about unfit! 5.8mph average speed
    > isn't much better than a mollusc.
    >
    > But I did it, and I actually *enjoyed* it, and it wasn't any worse than I expected.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Debbie Urban Theology Unit, Sheffield Views expressed in this email are my own and are not
    > necessarily those of the University of Sheffield or UTU.
     
  8. Stoatboy

    Stoatboy Guest

    > Debbie Urban Theology Unit, Sheffield

    I figure Sheffield's got to be the hilliest City in Britain. It seems like from any one point you
    either go up or you go down ! Get some reall low gear ratios, you'll need them :)

    What, if you'll excuse my curiosity, is Urban Theology ?
     
  9. Davep

    Davep Guest

    Debbie wrote:

    > Thanks to all for encouragement to start cycling again after 15 years.
    >
    > Today was day 1. Best beloved very kindly gave over the whole afternoon to working with me in the
    > kitchen to get the machine roadworthy. This involved buying lights - gosh, haven't they got
    > pretty? -

    yes indeed...and small , light and relatively inexpensive , the Cateye LD120 for only 2.95 from
    Parkers , great as an extra/backup. Clothing has come a long way too , be careful though , buying it
    can become addictive :)

    > and a computer to tell me how far and fast I go, replacing tyres (one of the *new* ones came with
    > an integrated puncture. Nasty cheap thai junk), tweaking brakes and raising the saddle (has my
    > inside leg increased, or did I always ride with it too low before?)
    >
    > Then out for a spin. It was only a bit over a mile, and as we live at the very top of a hill, the
    > first bit was easier than I expected. Coming home wasn't quite such a doddle, and I had to get off
    > and walk about 20 yards, up two steep bits, because I just don't have a low enough gear to make it
    > possible for flabby thighs to keep the bike moving. I suppose it was about 10 minutes in all, and
    > I arrived home triumphant but with stiff legs and wobbly knees, puffing like a train and it took
    > me half an hour to recover from the shock to the system. Talk about unfit! 5.8mph average speed
    > isn't much better than a mollusc.
    >
    > But I did it, and I actually *enjoyed* it, and it wasn't any worse than I expected.
    >

    This is what I love about cycling , it's enjoyable and fun with the big bonus of it being
    good for you !

    davep
     
  10. Debbie <[email protected]>typed

    > Thanks to all for encouragement to start cycling again after 15 years.

    > Today was day 1. Best beloved very kindly gave over the whole afternoon to working with me in the
    > kitchen to get the machine roadworthy. This involved buying lights - gosh, haven't they got
    > pretty? - and a computer to tell me how far and fast I go, replacing tyres (one of the *new* ones
    > came with an integrated puncture. Nasty cheap thai junk), tweaking brakes and raising the saddle
    > (has my inside leg increased, or did I always ride with it too low before?)

    You probably had it too low before...

    > 5.8mph average speed isn't much better than a mollusc.

    In all my time at Sheffield (nearly 7 years, from 1976-1983) I always worked that 6mph was a
    reasonale average speed and never managed to exceed it significantly, so 5.8mph for a beginner is
    JUST FINE! I was probably younger then than you are now.

    > But I did it, and I actually *enjoyed* it, and it wasn't any worse than I expected.

    Good! Keep going!

    There's plenty to enjoy round the Peak District but it's hard work...

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.
     
  11. Debbie

    Debbie Guest

    On Mon, 9 Feb 2004 12:01:48 -0000, "Stoatboy"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >> Debbie Urban Theology Unit, Sheffield
    >
    >I figure Sheffield's got to be the hilliest City in Britain. It seems like from any one point you
    >either go up or you go down ! Get some reall low gear ratios, you'll need them :)
    >
    >What, if you'll excuse my curiosity, is Urban Theology ?
    >

    It's cycling uphill in Sheffield saying to yourself, "God, why am I doing this?"

    Alternatively, it's a way of doing theology that takes as its starting point the experience of urban
    living. But the "Urban Theology Unit" name is actually a bit of word play, because it is both a Theology-
    Unit in the city, and a Unit doing Urban-Theology

    (Managed 6.3 mph ave today, and only walked one short uphill bit)
     
  12. On 2004-02-09 16:00 +0000, Debbie wrote:
    > On Mon, 9 Feb 2004 12:01:48 -0000, "Stoatboy" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>> Debbie Urban Theology Unit, Sheffield
    >>
    >>I figure Sheffield's got to be the hilliest City in Britain. It seems like from any one point you
    >>either go up or you go down ! Get some reall low gear ratios, you'll need them :)
    >>
    >>What, if you'll excuse my curiosity, is Urban Theology ?
    >>
    >
    > It's cycling uphill in Sheffield saying to yourself, "God, why am I doing this?"
    >
    > Alternatively, it's a way of doing theology that takes as its starting point the experience of
    > urban living. But the "Urban Theology Unit" name is actually a bit of word play, because it is
    > both a Theology-Unit in the city, and a Unit doing Urban-Theology

    And here I was, hoping it was a neat reference to _Candyman (1992)_
    <http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0103919/>. Except, really, that's just urban mythology wrapped up in a
    fur coat and a bad, bad film.

    > (Managed 6.3 mph ave today, and only walked one short uphill bit)

    Great! Things are improving, and if you keep at it, the pain eventually goes away :) Basically,
    pace yourself at first, take days off, and weave everyday travel - shopping, visiting, commute -
    into it when you can. Eventually, after a month or three of perseverance, you'll regain your cycling
    legs and'll be laughing.

    And after that, all of summer and the Peak District will beckon.

    --
    Andrew Chadwick You never hear a Cricket crowd chanting "who's the bastard in the hat?"
     
  13. Excellent Debbie! Keep it up, you'll soon be cyclign for miles and having great
    fun :)

    Cheers, helen s

    --This is an invalid email address to avoid spam-- to get correct one remove dependency on fame &
    fortune h*$el*$$e**nd***$o$ts***i*$*$m**m$$o*n**[email protected]$*$a$$o**l.c**$*$om$$
     
  14. Carol Hague

    Carol Hague Guest

    Debbie <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > But I did it, and I actually *enjoyed* it, and it wasn't any worse than I expected.

    Well done!

    There are days when I really don't feel like going out cycling, but I always feel better for it when
    I do - more awake and generally lively, even when the weather's lousy.

    Keep up the good work!

    --
    Carol Hague "...it's not normal if you don't like cake..." - Sean Yates
     
  15. Burt

    Burt Guest

    "Debbie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > (Managed 6.3 mph ave today, and only walked one short uphill bit)
    >
    Debbie, congratulations on your achievements and your determination. I well remember getting on a
    bike again, in nice flat Bristol - not, and having the wobbly leg syndrome for a few days. Keep it
    up and keep enjoying! but be warned: it can be adictive.
     
  16. Debbie

    Debbie Guest

    On Tue, 10 Feb 2004 17:22:01 -0000, "burt"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Debbie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >>
    >> (Managed 6.3 mph ave today, and only walked one short uphill bit)
    >>
    >Debbie, congratulations on your achievements and your determination. I well remember getting on a
    >bike again, in nice flat Bristol - not, and having the wobbly leg syndrome for a few days. Keep it
    >up and keep enjoying! but be warned: it can be adictive.

    Wobbly legs is something I'm really noticing. And I was so stiff last night that I woke up every
    time I turned over.

    But today was better, and marginally faster. I managed to cycle the whole way, no walking at all,
    and it didn't hurt as much - except for the sit bones which best beloved informs me have visible
    bruises. I also recovered quicker, and am less stiff now. One real advantage of being so very unfit
    to start with is that the improvement is noticeable day by day. I also discovered what a pain it is
    cycling into wind: I'm somewhat less aerodynamic than I was in my yoof. But that is improving on a
    daily basis, too.

    Good news is that BB has found an unwanted cycle with proper gears looking for a home for free. But
    best of all, as I was leaving work at lunchtime to do my ride, my colleague said she was off to the
    gym - and I got a warm glow of superiority :)

    Addictive? I love it!

    Debbie

    --

    Debbie Urban Theology Unit, Sheffield Views expressed in this email are my own and are not
    necessarily those of the University of Sheffield or UTU.
     
  17. Steph Peters

    Steph Peters Guest

    Debbie <[email protected]> of ntlworld News Service
    wrote:.
    >Talk about unfit! 5.8mph average speed isn't much better than a mollusc.
    >
    >But I did it, and I actually *enjoyed* it, and it wasn't any worse than I expected.
    Well done. You're doing a lot better than I did when I took up cycling again as a middle aged heavy
    person. I had the advantage of a bike with 5 gears, and in flat Manchester, not hilly Sheffield. My
    first trip was the path along the old railway line and back, which is a whole mile. Afterwards my
    bum hurt like hell and my knees were wobbly for an hour. It took me 2 weeks to work up to 5 (flat)
    miles, which were sufficient to have me collapsed on the sofa for the rest of the day.

    Steph Still a fatbirdonabike, but still on that bike daily.
    --
    The English think incompetence is the same thing as sincerity. Quentin Crisp
    Steph Peters delete invalid from [email protected]
    Tatting, lace & stitching page <http://www.sandbenders.demon.co.uk/index.htm
     
  18. gemarc

    gemarc New Member

    Joined:
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    I have found a good tip for tackling Sheffields many "challenging" hills is to take your time, select the easyest gear and go as slow as you can without stopping you may suprise yourself how far you get when you are not rushing to get to the top
     
  19. and its only going to get better :).... best of luck!

    On Sun, 08 Feb 2004 23:16:31 +0000, Debbie <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Thanks to all for encouragement to start cycling again after 15 years.
    >
    > Today was day 1. Best beloved very kindly gave over the whole afternoon to working with me in the
    > kitchen to get the machine roadworthy. This involved buying lights - gosh, haven't they got
    > pretty? - and a computer to tell me how far and fast I go, replacing tyres (one of the *new* ones
    > came with an integrated puncture. Nasty cheap thai junk), tweaking brakes and raising the saddle
    > (has my inside leg increased, or did I always ride with it too low before?)
    >
    > Then out for a spin. It was only a bit over a mile, and as we live at the very top of a hill, the
    > first bit was easier than I expected. Coming home wasn't quite such a doddle, and I had to get off
    > and walk about 20 yards, up two steep bits, because I just don't have a low enough gear to make it
    > possible for flabby thighs to keep the bike moving. I suppose it was about 10 minutes in all, and
    > I arrived home triumphant but with stiff legs and wobbly knees, puffing like a train and it took
    > me half an hour to recover from the shock to the system. Talk about unfit! 5.8mph average speed
    > isn't much better than a mollusc.
    >
    > But I did it, and I actually *enjoyed* it, and it wasn't any worse than I expected.
    >

    --
    Using M2, Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/m2/
     
  20. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    Debbie <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > But today was better, and marginally faster. I managed to cycle the whole way, no walking at all,

    I know I'm repeating myself but I'm slightly worried that you have the wrong focus. You seem to be
    hung up on your speed and climbing ability. At this stage I feel they are completely irrelevant. You
    should be thinking about gradually extending your distance and time in the saddle. Speed and
    strength will increase automatically, but it's extended gentle aerobic exercise you should be aiming
    for. So what if you walk a few hills if it allows you to spend more time actually cycling?

    > and it didn't hurt as much - except for the sit bones which best beloved informs me have visible
    > bruises.

    Oh yes, they will be tender for a little while. :)

    > Good news is that BB has found an unwanted cycle with proper gears looking for a home for free.

    Excellent, if it fits you. Does it have a triple? How many gears and what is the range?

    > But best of all, as I was leaving work at lunchtime to do my ride, my colleague said she was off
    > to the gym - and I got a warm glow of superiority :)

    So you should. It's very unlikely that the workout she gets in the gym will be anwhere near as good
    for her as your bicycle rides are for you. The gym has its place but most gym users are wasting
    their time and money (IMO of course). In a few weeks it's going to show and people will do a double
    take and ask, "Have you been on a diet, Debbie?"

    > Addictive? I love it!

    It's early days yet. As you get fitter it will become more enjoyable still. There will be times when
    you might feel jaded and have to force yourself to get out there, but you need to be in it for the
    long haul. Eventually you may drop Patrick on the climb home, but that's a long way down the line.

    --
    Dave...
     
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