First Ride Observations

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Not Responding, Jan 9, 2005.

  1. Out on the road bike today, although it was the 2nd ride if you count
    the "delivery trip" from the LBS on Friday. Only 14 miles and I took 90
    minutes over it as it included a non-negotiable leisurely tea stop. I
    even dug out my lycra shorts and cycling jersey.

    First observation; how do roadies carry all their goods and chattels? I
    generally don't set out with less than a rack pack and bar bag just
    throw stuff in. A quick audit this morning shows that I usually take:
    tool kit, 2 spare inners, puncture kit, pump, mobile phone,
    walkman/radio, wallet, house keys, lock & keys, waterproof trousers and
    jacket, overshoes, map, book (for reading in cafes), snacks, fags &
    lighter. Try getting all that into a jersey pocket. I whittled this list
    down to some cash and a phone with mp3. The big question is, how the
    hell do you carry a pump? I really don't want to lash it to that lovely
    lustrous frame. Today I chanced it.

    Second observation; comfort. The bike's not uncomfortable but the whole
    posture is very different. I can only use the brakes if I'm crouched
    down and I don't yet feel totally at ease like that. It's going to take
    a while for me to get used to all aspects of the drop bars. I'm not all
    that convinced that there really that many more hand positions with
    drops than with flat bars and bar ends. It seems truer to say that drops
    give you more *body* positions to choose from. Finally, the saddle.
    Well, I won't swap it yet but my bum tells me that it is as minimalist
    and svelte as it looks (the saddle, that is).

    Third observation; riding the thing. I really am sure it's faster. I'm
    going to get a GPS or computer for it to check this but, then again,
    maybe I don't really want to discover that I'm doing the same speed but
    with less suspension. I realise that I'm a bit low on confidence still
    but it's been a long time since I was scared of speed on a bike. I was
    coming down Portsdown Hill on Friday on the brakes all the way:( Maybe a
    triple wasn't strictly necessary - can't see myself needing the big
    chainring!

    That'll do for now as I'm being summoned for lunch.
     
    Tags:


  2. MSeries

    MSeries Guest

    Not Responding wrote:
    > Out on the road bike today, although it was the 2nd ride if you count
    > the "delivery trip" from the LBS on Friday. Only 14 miles and I took 90
    > minutes over it as it included a non-negotiable leisurely tea stop. I
    > even dug out my lycra shorts and cycling jersey.
    >
    > First observation; how do roadies carry all their goods and chattels? I
    > generally don't set out with less than a rack pack and bar bag just
    > throw stuff in. A quick audit this morning shows that I usually take:
    > tool kit, 2 spare inners, puncture kit, pump, mobile phone,
    > walkman/radio, wallet, house keys, lock & keys, waterproof trousers and
    > jacket, overshoes, map, book (for reading in cafes), snacks, fags &
    > lighter. Try getting all that into a jersey pocket. I whittled this list
    > down to some cash and a phone with mp3. The big question is, how the
    > hell do you carry a pump? I really don't want to lash it to that lovely
    > lustrous frame. Today I chanced it.
    >


    I have a frame fitting pump that fits to the frame of each bike. I carry
    my tools, spare tube, levers, puncture repair kit in my saddle pack.
    Everything else in my jersey/jacket. In there I usually have, cellular
    phone, map, money, identification, ravaitaillement. Maybe a windproof
    gilet (this sometimes gets stuffed in the saddle pack), arm warmers,
    waterproof. A small (not really secure but some sort of deterent) lock
    is looped around my saddle rails sometimes.


    > Second observation; comfort. The bike's not uncomfortable but the whole
    > posture is very different. I can only use the brakes if I'm crouched
    > down and I don't yet feel totally at ease like that. It's going to take
    > a while for me to get used to all aspects of the drop bars. I'm not all
    > that convinced that there really that many more hand positions with
    > drops than with flat bars and bar ends. It seems truer to say that drops
    > give you more *body* positions to choose from. Finally, the saddle.
    > Well, I won't swap it yet but my bum tells me that it is as minimalist
    > and svelte as it looks (the saddle, that is).
    >
    > Third observation; riding the thing. I really am sure it's faster. I'm
    > going to get a GPS or computer for it to check this but, then again,
    > maybe I don't really want to discover that I'm doing the same speed but
    > with less suspension. I realise that I'm a bit low on confidence still
    > but it's been a long time since I was scared of speed on a bike. I was
    > coming down Portsdown Hill on Friday on the brakes all the way:( Maybe a
    > triple wasn't strictly necessary - can't see myself needing the big
    > chainring!
    >
    > That'll do for now as I'm being summoned for lunch.
     
  3. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "Not Responding" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:41e13b69$0$22497
    >
    > First observation; how do roadies carry all their goods and chattels? I
    > generally don't set out with less than a rack pack and bar bag just throw
    > stuff in.


    Pump on top tube (morphs into floor pump) and tools in saddle bag. On longer
    trips I can use second bottle cage as shown here:

    http://www.simonmason.karoo.net/fondriest2.jpg

    Nicorette tabs take up less space than fags and lighter ;-)

    --
    Simon Mason
    Anlaby
    East Yorkshire.
    53°44'N 0°26'W
    http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
  4. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Not Responding wrote:
    >
    > First observation; how do roadies carry all their goods and chattels?


    Pockets, seat pack and sometimes Camelback.

    > I generally don't set out with less than a rack pack and bar bag just
    > throw stuff in.



    > A quick audit this morning shows that I usually take:
    > tool kit

    Yes, in small pack under seat with puncture kit and loose change
    , 2 spare inners,
    No
    > puncture kit, pump, mobile phone,

    Yes, latter two in back pocket or pump in frame clip
    > walkman/radio,

    No - much too busy enjoying the cycling and scenery.
    > wallet,

    No, credit card a bit of cash only in back pocket
    > house keys,

    Yes, back pocket
    > lock & keys,

    Small cable lock - I always leave it where I can see it so I only need a
    delaying lock not a protecting lock. Wrapped round seat post
    > waterproof trousers and jacket

    Only jacket which I either wear or folds into itself with a waist strap.
    Legs can get wet and dry out again
    , overshoes
    Either I wear them or leave them at home
    , map,
    If I'm not sure where I'm going it goes in a back pocket in a plastic bag
    > book (for reading in cafes), snacks,

    No and I stop for snacks. The map will keep me happily amused in a cafe
    > fags & lighter.

    Absolutely not

    >
    > Second observation; comfort. The bike's not uncomfortable but the whole
    > posture is very different. I can only use the brakes if I'm crouched
    > down and I don't yet feel totally at ease like that. It's going to take
    > a while for me to get used to all aspects of the drop bars. I'm not all
    > that convinced that there really that many more hand positions with
    > drops than with flat bars and bar ends. It seems truer to say that drops
    > give you more *body* positions to choose from. Finally, the saddle.
    > Well, I won't swap it yet but my bum tells me that it is as minimalist
    > and svelte as it looks (the saddle, that is).


    Top centre of bars, top on the corners, forward on the hood (my normal
    riding position), down on the drops. Thats four vs two on flats with
    bar ends and one on flats.
    >
    > Third observation; riding the thing. I really am sure it's faster. I'm
    > going to get a GPS or computer for it to check this but, then again,
    > maybe I don't really want to discover that I'm doing the same speed but
    > with less suspension. I realise that I'm a bit low on confidence still
    > but it's been a long time since I was scared of speed on a bike. I was
    > coming down Portsdown Hill on Friday on the brakes all the way:( Maybe a
    > triple wasn't strictly necessary - can't see myself needing the big
    > chainring!
    >


    You will, trust me ;-)

    Tony
     
  5. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Not
    Responding ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Out on the road bike today, although it was the 2nd ride if you count
    > the "delivery trip" from the LBS on Friday. Only 14 miles and I took
    > 90 minutes over it as it included a non-negotiable leisurely tea stop.
    > I even dug out my lycra shorts and cycling jersey.
    >
    > First observation; how do roadies carry all their goods and chattels?
    > I generally don't set out with less than a rack pack and bar bag just
    > throw stuff in.


    Real roadies don't (well, they have a team car to do that for them). I
    use a bar bag. Other people I know mostly limit themselves to what they
    can stuff in the back pockets of their jerseys.

    > A quick audit this morning shows that I usually take:
    > tool kit,


    check

    > 2 spare inners,


    1 spare inner

    > puncture kit,


    check

    > pump,


    on bike

    > mobile phone,


    usually

    > walkman/radio,


    sometimes

    > wallet,


    check

    > house keys,


    check

    > lock & keys,


    No need. You aren't going to let the bike out of your sight anyway, as a
    lock good enough to protect your #1 road bike when out of your sight
    hasn't been invented yet.

    > waterproof trousers
    > and jacket,


    No. The bulk just gets too much. If it's winter and it looks like rain,
    wear your waterproof jacket instead of a windproof (although most
    windproofs are in fact pretty showerproof). 'Roubaix' style (fleecy)
    lycra longs are warm enough in winter even when wet provided you keep
    going.

    > overshoes,


    Wear them or don't take them.

    > map,


    sometimes

    > book (for reading in cafes),


    No. Too much weight.

    > snacks,


    A couple of cereal bars. Anything more bulky can be purchased en route.

    > fags
    > & lighter.


    Not needed.

    > Try getting all that into a jersey pocket. I whittled this
    > list down to some cash and a phone with mp3. The big question is, how
    > the hell do you carry a pump? I really don't want to lash it to that
    > lovely lustrous frame. Today I chanced it.


    Two solutions: best is get a frame fit pump like the Topeak Road Morph;
    alternatively get a compact with a water-bottle-holder-clip such as the
    Blackburn Airstick, one of which adorns each of my bikes.

    > Second observation; comfort. The bike's not uncomfortable but the
    > whole posture is very different. I can only use the brakes if I'm
    > crouched down and I don't yet feel totally at ease like that.


    If you're on Campag (which I think you are) you should find that you
    have two comfortable positions from which you can work the brakes
    effectively. The first is with the web of your hands on the hoods; this
    should be a comfortably relaxed slouching position (particularly on
    your bike which seems to have its bars pretty much as high as the
    saddle). The second is down on the drops which is, as you say, a
    crouching position.

    > It's
    > going to take a while for me to get used to all aspects of the drop
    > bars. I'm not all that convinced that there really that many more hand
    > positions with drops than with flat bars and bar ends. It seems truer
    > to say that drops give you more *body* positions to choose from.
    > Finally, the saddle. Well, I won't swap it yet but my bum tells me
    > that it is as minimalist and svelte as it looks (the saddle, that is).


    I have, at least temporarily, put a 'minimalist, svelte' Selle Italia
    SLR on my Dolan. I find this OK for thirty-milers and haven't yet tried
    it on an eighty-miler; but I don't (yet, at any rate) find it anything
    like as comfortable as the Brooks Professionals I have on all my other
    bikes. It is, however, more than 500g lighter, and that's a difference
    which, IMHO, makes a difference.

    > Third observation; riding the thing. I really am sure it's faster. I'm
    > going to get a GPS or computer for it to check this but, then again,
    > maybe I don't really want to discover that I'm doing the same speed
    > but with less suspension.


    You aren't. You really are going faster. It's amazing the difference it
    makes.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    ;; Skill without imagination is craftsmanship and gives us
    ;; many useful objects such as wickerwork picnic baskets.
    ;; Imagination without skill gives us modern art.
    ;; Tom Stoppard, Artist Descending A Staircase
     
  6. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    Not Responding wrote:

    > The big question is, how the
    > hell do you carry a pump? I really don't want to lash it to that lovely
    > lustrous frame. Today I chanced it.


    Either use a mini-pump which can go in your jersey pocket or attached
    with a special clip below your bottle cage, or go for a CO2 system that
    can be fitted into a tiny behind-the-saddle bag along with your tyre
    levers, spare tube and multi-tool. With your arm this might be a better
    idea than a hand pump in any case.

    --
    Dave...

    Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the
    future of the human race. - H. G. Wells
     
  7. JBB

    JBB Guest

    "Not Responding" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Out on the road bike today, although it was the 2nd ride if you count the
    > "delivery trip" from the LBS on Friday. Only 14 miles and I took 90
    > minutes over it as it included a non-negotiable leisurely tea stop. I even
    > dug out my lycra shorts and cycling jersey.
    >
    > First observation; how do roadies carry all their goods and chattels? I
    > generally don't set out with less than a rack pack and bar bag just throw
    > stuff in. A quick audit this morning shows that I usually take: tool kit,
    > 2 spare inners, puncture kit, pump, mobile phone, walkman/radio, wallet,
    > house keys, lock & keys, waterproof trousers and jacket, overshoes, map,
    > book (for reading in cafes), snacks, fags & lighter. Try getting all that
    > into a jersey pocket. I whittled this list down to some cash and a phone
    > with mp3. The big question is, how the hell do you carry a pump? I really
    > don't want to lash it to that lovely lustrous frame. Today I chanced it.
    >

    Dunno about roadies! I use a Carradice SQR seatpost bag - holds everything
    for a 200k audax. Pump is Innovations road air - I can get 120psi front it
    and is has a bracket that fits on the bottlecage mounts. Alternayively for a
    quick blast spare tube and tyre levers and mobile phone in jersey pockets.

    HTH
    Julia
     
  8. Al C-F

    Al C-F Guest

    On Sun, 09 Jan 2005 14:31:34 +0000, Not Responding <[email protected]>
    wrote:


    >
    >First observation; how do roadies carry all their goods and chattels? I
    >generally don't set out with less than a rack pack and bar bag just
    >throw stuff in.


    >A quick audit this morning shows that I usually take:
    >tool kit, 2 spare inners, puncture kit,


    seat pack

    >pump,


    clipped in front of seat tube

    > mobile phone,
    >walkman/radio, wallet,


    no radio, but others in jersey pockets

    > house keys,


    one key on string round neck

    >lock & keys,


    lock clips to holder below saddle & pack

    > waterproof trousers and
    >jacket, overshoes, map,


    bungee strap on rack

    >book (for reading in cafes), snacks, fags &
    >lighter.


    not required.

    >
    >Second observation; comfort. The bike's not uncomfortable but the whole
    >posture is very different. I can only use the brakes if I'm crouched
    >down and I don't yet feel totally at ease like that.


    brake from the hoods
     
  9. > how the
    > hell do you carry a pump? I really don't want to lash it to that lovely
    > lustrous frame.


    Most of us just lash it to an old, battered frame :-/

    > I can only use the brakes if I'm crouched down


    Web of hands over the hood bits like wot wossname said allows you to work
    the brakes adequately. It's not going to let you do and emergency stop
    (well, trundlies say you can but they're lying). I often go on the drops
    just because of the extra breaking power, but that's because I'm always
    runing late and rushing through SMIDSY central.

    > I'm not all that convinced that there really that many more hand

    positions with drops than with flat bars and bar ends.

    There's loads, but there's only three 'normal' ones. The rest are used
    only for variety 'cos you're futher away from the brakes/have less
    control.

    > Third observation; riding the thing. I really am sure it's faster.


    By just a few miles an hour, but that's significant when you're doing 30
    or less. The lower riding position makes it seem faster, and also seems
    to force you to go faster as well.

    Downhill may be a different matter. The drops give an aerodynamic
    advantage, but is this outweighed by the sheer weight of my mates lead
    pipe mountain bike?
     
  10. Simon Brooke wrote:
    > in message <[email protected]>, Not
    > Responding ('[email protected]') wrote:


    snip

    >>Second observation; comfort. The bike's not uncomfortable but the
    >>whole posture is very different. I can only use the brakes if I'm
    >>crouched down and I don't yet feel totally at ease like that.

    >
    >
    > If you're on Campag (which I think you are) you should find that you
    > have two comfortable positions from which you can work the brakes
    > effectively. The first is with the web of your hands on the hoods; this
    > should be a comfortably relaxed slouching position (particularly on
    > your bike which seems to have its bars pretty much as high as the
    > saddle).


    Thanks for that. I've just tried it and it works. Wonder why my hands
    didn't naturally find that out?
     
  11. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    MSeries wrote:
    > Not Responding wrote:


    >> First observation; how do roadies carry all their goods and chattels?
    >> I generally don't set out with less than a rack pack and bar bag just
    >> throw stuff in. A quick audit this morning shows that I usually take:
    >> tool kit, 2 spare inners, puncture kit, pump, mobile phone,
    >> walkman/radio, wallet, house keys, lock & keys, waterproof trousers
    >> and jacket, overshoes, map, book (for reading in cafes), snacks, fags
    >> & lighter. Try getting all that into a jersey pocket. I whittled this
    >> list down to some cash and a phone with mp3. The big question is, how
    >> the hell do you carry a pump? I really don't want to lash it to that
    >> lovely lustrous frame. Today I chanced it.
    >>

    >
    > I have a frame fitting pump that fits to the frame of each bike. I carry
    > my tools, spare tube, levers, puncture repair kit in my saddle pack.
    > Everything else in my jersey/jacket. In there I usually have, cellular
    > phone, map, money, identification, ravaitaillement. Maybe a windproof
    > gilet (this sometimes gets stuffed in the saddle pack), arm warmers,
    > waterproof. A small (not really secure but some sort of deterent) lock
    > is looped around my saddle rails sometimes.


    More or less the same. I ritually puncture a new tube every new year as
    payment for my puncture license [1] so have paid my dues and don't need
    a puncture repair kit to placate the PF. I put immediate valuables in
    the jersey pockets (wallet, phone, keys). A map fits just right in to
    the jersey pockets. Frame fit pump, or a small compact one is fine. with
    three pockets I can add plenty of munchies.

    I don't take a book or fags.

    If I want more space I put the saddlebag on, into which I can quite
    happily fit my smallest real tripod, digital camera, and other gubbins
    like waterproof (including the toolkit in the seat pack).


    >> Second observation; comfort. The bike's not uncomfortable but the
    >> whole posture is very different. I can only use the brakes if I'm
    >> crouched down

    You shood be able to use them from the drops and from the hoods. From
    the hoods feels a bit strange at first but works just fine.


    >> and I don't yet feel totally at ease like that. It's
    >> going to take a while for me to get used to all aspects of the drop
    >> bars. I'm not all that convinced that there really that many more hand
    >> positions with drops than with flat bars and bar ends.


    two more in my estimation (making six).Road[MTB]: Full hands on top
    [hands on grips]; First finger on grips, rest of hand off [same again];
    Hands around hoods, palm to side. [Hands on bar ends]; Palms flat on top
    of hoods [Palms flat on top of bar ends]; hands on end of drops [no
    comparison]; hands on drops in bend [no comparison].

    This is of course ignoring the Sean Yates 'roasting chicken' position
    where you clasp your hands together around the steerer and stem and put
    your chin on the bars (metaphorically).


    >> It seems truer
    >> to say that drops give you more *body* positions to choose from.
    >> Finally, the saddle. Well, I won't swap it yet but my bum tells me
    >> that it is as minimalist and svelte as it looks (the saddle, that is).


    definitely one of those things you will have to try several of.

    >> Third observation; riding the thing. I really am sure it's faster.


    It is. Especially up hill.

    >> I'm
    >> going to get a GPS or computer for it to check this but, then again,
    >> maybe I don't really want to discover that I'm doing the same speed
    >> but with less suspension. I realise that I'm a bit low on confidence
    >> still but it's been a long time since I was scared of speed on a bike.
    >> I was coming down Portsdown Hill on Friday on the brakes all the way:(
    >> Maybe a triple wasn't strictly necessary - can't see myself needing
    >> the big chainring!


    Compact double.. didn't we tell you so?

    So when is the first '10'?

    ...d
     
  12. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    Mark Thompson wrote:

    >
    >>I can only use the brakes if I'm crouched down

    >
    >
    > Web of hands over the hood bits like wot wossname said allows you to work
    > the brakes adequately. It's not going to let you do and emergency stop
    > (well, trundlies say you can but they're lying).

    I get bette brake control from the hoods, rather than the drops. I
    *much* prefer braking from the hoods. Then again, I have just changed
    the levers so that may now be different.


    >
    >
    >>I'm not all that convinced that there really that many more hand
    >> positions with drops than with flat bars and bar ends.

    >
    > There's loads, but there's only three 'normal' ones. The rest are used
    > only for variety 'cos you're futher away from the brakes/have less
    > control.


    I missed 'no hands' in my list, but that applies to both.

    > Downhill may be a different matter. The drops give an aerodynamic
    > advantage, but is this outweighed by the sheer weight of my mates lead
    > pipe mountain bike?


    No. aerodynamics wins every time. Weight scales linearly, aerodynamics
    as a square.

    However, if your mate ditched his flat bars for drops..

    This is one disadvantage of losing the aerobelly, descents get slower.

    ...d
     
  13. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Not Responding wrote:
    [.............]
    > The big question is, how
    > the hell do you carry a pump? I really don't want to lash it to that
    > lovely lustrous frame. Today I chanced it.


    I don't think an HPX under the top tube looks so bad (zip tie on head tube
    to act as a peg), but there's plenty of mini pumps and CO2 things if you
    want an alternative. Spare tube can be an ultralight one to keep the bulk
    down. A fair amount can be stuffed into a Carradice Prima Maxi wedge
    bag*, or onto a seatpost rack, but a smaller bag wards off Kitchen Sink
    Syndrome.

    * so big that it can obstruct legs, depending on saddle width, saddle
    position, and legs!

    > Second observation; comfort. The bike's not uncomfortable but the
    > whole posture is very different. I can only use the brakes if I'm
    > crouched down and I don't yet feel totally at ease like that. It's
    > going to take a while for me to get used to all aspects of the drop
    > bars.


    Shouldn't have to crouch down to use the brakes from the hood position
    (pushing levers from above rather than pulling them from drops), and that
    way of using the brakes should be adequate for most situations. The
    handlebar stem may be too long or low otherwise, or perhasp levers could
    be moved up or down the bars a bit.

    > I'm not all that convinced that there really that many more
    > hand positions with drops than with flat bars and bar ends. It seems
    > truer to say that drops give you more *body* positions to choose
    > from.


    I find it's more hand positions as well, partly because I have as much as
    possible of the bars taped to provide an infinite number of hand positions
    on the "tops". Some bars offer more usuable positions than others (re
    shape of bit just behind levers) and exact position of levers makes a
    difference too.

    /snip
    > I realise that I'm a bit low on confidence
    > still but it's been a long time since I was scared of speed on a
    > bike. I was coming down Portsdown Hill on Friday on the brakes all
    > the way:( Maybe a triple wasn't strictly necessary - can't see myself
    > needing the big chainring!


    Takes a good few rides, and often some tinkering of riding position, to
    get used to any bike (partcularly so with road bikes). Best of luck.

    What cassette did you get, BTW?

    ~PB
     
  14. Steph Peters

    Steph Peters Guest

    Not Responding <[email protected]> of wrote:
    > mobile phone, walkman/radio, map, book (for reading in cafes),

    Combine all that lot in a pocket pc phone edition e.g. XDA IIs.
    --
    Maintenance-free: When it breaks, it can't be fixed...
    Steph Peters delete invalid from [email protected]lid
    Tatting, lace & stitching page <http://www.sandbenders.demon.co.uk/index.htm>
     
  15. In news:[email protected],
    Steph Peters <[email protected]> typed:
    > Not Responding <[email protected]> of wrote:
    >> mobile phone, walkman/radio, map, book (for reading in cafes),

    > Combine all that lot in a pocket pc phone edition e.g. XDA IIs.


    Or a P900, like he's already got, IIRC. There's also a Bluetooth GPS you can
    get for it, too, although I don't think there's any OS map software
    available for it at the moment. Sounds like a cool toy, though.

    A
     
  16. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Ambrose Nankivell wrote:
    >
    > Or a P900, like he's already got, IIRC. There's also a Bluetooth GPS you can
    > get for it, too, although I don't think there's any OS map software
    > available for it at the moment. Sounds like a cool toy, though.
    >


    I recently got a P910 after ages of deliberating whether to wait for the
    Treo650 (to replace a Treo370 that broke). Must say I wish now I had
    waited. P900/910 software falls a long way short of Treo/Palm software
    - it doesn't even sync properly unless you make Outlook your default
    e-mail programme.

    Tony
     
  17. In news:[email protected],
    Tony Raven <[email protected]> typed:
    > Ambrose Nankivell wrote:
    >>
    >> Or a P900, like he's already got, IIRC. There's also a Bluetooth GPS
    >> you can get for it, too, although I don't think there's any OS map
    >> software available for it at the moment. Sounds like a cool toy,
    >> though.
    >>

    >
    > I recently got a P910 after ages of deliberating whether to wait for
    > the Treo650 (to replace a Treo370 that broke). Must say I wish now I
    > had waited. P900/910 software falls a long way short of Treo/Palm
    > software - it doesn't even sync properly unless you make Outlook your
    > default e-mail programme.


    Yeah, the lack of sync to MAPI is a silly fault. Can't see why they couldn't
    do it. If anyone had reverse engineered the protocol, I'd be happy doing the
    sync bit. I'm pleased with the 3rd party software available, but mainly I've
    just used Opera and things for games, EScummVM being a great way to relive
    the games of my childhood in spare moments.

    GPS software looks pretty poor indeed. Maybe if I've got copious free time,
    do a lot of riding and have a bit of spare cash over the next year I could
    try and hack something together. It'd be fun, anyway.

    A
     
  18. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Mark
    Thompson ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Web of hands over the hood bits like wot wossname said allows you to
    > work the brakes adequately.  It's not going to let you do and
    > emergency stop


    Does on Campag. Not on Shimano, allegedly (but then I wouldn't know).
    But current generation Campags, you can definitely emergency stop from
    the hoods.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; MS Windows: A thirty-two bit extension ... to a sixteen bit
    ;; patch to an eight bit operating system originally coded for a
    ;; four bit microprocessor and sold by a two-bit company that
    ;; can't stand one bit of competition -- anonymous
     
  19. Call me Bob

    Call me Bob Guest

    On Sun, 09 Jan 2005 14:31:34 +0000, Not Responding <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >First observation; how do roadies carry all their goods and chattels? I
    >generally don't set out with less than a rack pack and bar bag just
    >throw stuff in. A quick audit this morning shows that I usually take:
    >tool kit, 2 spare inners, puncture kit, pump, mobile phone,
    >walkman/radio, wallet, house keys, lock & keys, waterproof trousers and
    >jacket, overshoes, map, book (for reading in cafes), snacks, fags &
    >lighter. Try getting all that into a jersey pocket. I whittled this list
    >down to some cash and a phone with mp3. The big question is, how the
    >hell do you carry a pump? I really don't want to lash it to that lovely
    >lustrous frame.


    Pump? I carry mine underneath a small seat pack. See pics:

    http://homepage.ntlworld.com/gareth.evans490/seatpack1.jpg

    http://homepage.ntlworld.com/gareth.evans490/seatpack2.jpg

    There are two elastic straps stitched to the underside of the pack
    which I augment with a couple of rubber bands. It works very well, the
    pump is secure, doesn't rattle, and clips on and off the bike in one
    neat bundle with the seat pack.

    I have the (Topeak) clips attached to the saddles of all my bikes, so
    I can snap the pack onto whichever bike I happen to be taking out.

    I usually carry less than you, and so use the smallest seat pack in
    the range, but it's still big enough for...

    tools, inner tube, two puncture repair kits (park glueless and
    traditional), tyre boot, spokey, 2 tyre levers, a ten pound note and a
    fifty pence piece.

    If I'm out for a ride I don't need my wallet, or phone and my mp3
    player is worn in a pocket or on my arm.

    --

    Call me "Bob"

    "More oneness, less categories,
    Open hearts, no strategies"

    Email address is spam trapped, to reply directly remove the beverage.
     
  20. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Ambrose Nankivell wrote:
    >
    > Yeah, the lack of sync to MAPI is a silly fault. Can't see why they couldn't
    > do it. If anyone had reverse engineered the protocol, I'd be happy doing the
    > sync bit. I'm pleased with the 3rd party software available, but mainly I've
    > just used Opera and things for games, EScummVM being a great way to relive
    > the games of my childhood in spare moments.
    >


    Its not that it doesn't have it. I have set mine to not sync e-mail
    because I'm not interested in having e-mail messages on the phone but to
    sync Outlook Calendar or Tasks you still have to set Outlook as your
    default e-mail client or else it adds all your desktop data to the data
    in the phone creating multiple entries. I now have a e-mail client
    switch shortcut on my desktop so I have to switch to Outlook as default
    e-mail, sync the P910 and switch back to TB as default e-mail. Palm
    stuff has that all sorted out, works well and makes Sony-Ericsson look
    like amateur rubbish. There is a hell of a lot more software around
    that runs on the Palm platform including a lot of free stuff whereas SE
    is very limited and seems to come with high prices attached and a
    minimal set packaged with the phone.

    Tony
     
Loading...
Loading...