First ride on first bike...

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Determined, May 3, 2003.

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  1. Determined

    Determined Guest

    I wound up taking my 6 yr old nephew with me, so I decided to do something reasonable for my first
    time out. We took the bike trail from Bonneville Dam to Cascade Locks on the old hwy... I coulda
    swore it was uphill both ways... And carrying 2 bikes down 4 flights of stairs was fun.... But lunch
    at the Charburger is always worth it, especially with those giant cookies they make! The entire
    thing is paved, and there are some great views of the river, the dam and some waterfalls. the noise
    of I-84 is deafening at times, but a nice little ride anyways, about 7-8 miles round trip.

    One thing I realized is that clothing is pretty important. I don't have any biking specific
    clothing. I wore workout pants a tank and a hooded sweatshirt. It was cold outside, so I was
    sweating and freezing at the same time. What would be a good clothing base for riding?

    --
    determined
     
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  2. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    determined wrote:
    > I wound up taking my 6 yr old nephew with me, so I decided to do something reasonable for my
    > first time out. We took the bike trail from Bonneville Dam to Cascade Locks on the old hwy... I
    > coulda swore it was uphill both ways... And carrying 2 bikes down 4 flights of stairs was fun....
    > But lunch at the Charburger is always worth it, especially with those giant cookies they make!
    > The entire thing is paved, and there are some great views of the river, the dam and some
    > waterfalls. the noise of I-84 is deafening at times, but a nice little ride anyways, about 7-8
    > miles round trip.
    >

    dude, you are supposed to ride the stairs!! <wink>

    > One thing I realized is that clothing is pretty important. I don't have any biking specific
    > clothing. I wore workout pants a tank and a hooded sweatshirt. It was cold outside, so I was
    > sweating and freezing at the same time. What would be a good clothing base for riding?

    Bike shorts really are a must,,, if nothing else the pad keeps your butt (or whatever) from getting
    saddle sore. Over your shorts you could wear some sort of light wicking tights. The key is a
    "wicking" synthetic... these fabrics move moisture away from your body so that the moisture
    evaporates, and also will insulate you when the fabric is damp-ish. Cotton does none of these things
    - it hold moisture against your skin promoting heat loss, chilling and eventually hypothermia.

    Upper body...for cooler weather I wear a long sleeve jersey( any cheapo wicking/synthetic/polyester
    long sleeve shirt will do) with a short sleeve jersey. I'll add a lightweight water resistant shell
    if it's really windy, or rainy, or just to break the chill.

    Be careful not to overdress... you will always be much warmer after the first mile than you will be
    standing in the parking lot.

    For cheap stuff, check www.performance.com; www.sierratradingpost.com or www.campmor.com for various
    bargain/closeout wicking tops and or bike shorts & tights.

    Penny S
     
  3. Gabrielle

    Gabrielle Guest

    On Sat, 03 May 2003 17:30:16 -0700, determined wrote:

    > I wound up taking my 6 yr old nephew with me, so I decided to do something reasonable for my first
    > time out. We took the bike trail from Bonneville Dam to Cascade Locks on the old hwy... I coulda
    > swore it was uphill both ways...

    The section between HR and Mosier is uphill both ways as well. ;)

    I've been meaning to take the Mr. on the section you rode today--we can see some of the waterfalls
    from I-84 and it's always intrigued me. Though I didn't realize there were stairs. I was aware of a
    set between Eagle Creek and Bonneville; where are the others?

    gabrielle
     
  4. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Bike shorts really are a must,,, if nothing else the pad keeps your butt (or whatever) from
    > getting saddle sore. Over your shorts you could wear some sort of light wicking tights. The key is
    > a "wicking" synthetic... these fabrics move moisture away from your body so that the moisture
    > evaporates, and also will insulate you when the fabric is damp-ish. Cotton does none of these
    > things - it hold moisture against your skin promoting heat loss, chilling and eventually
    > hypothermia.
    >

    In cooler weather, you can get hypothermia, but in the hot weather, you can get heatstroke as you
    can't evaporate the sweat off.

    ~Travis
    --
    travis57 at megalink dot net

    travis5765.homelinux.net, Primary Administrator TF Custom Electronics, Owner/Founder/Developer
    (current project: Automotive exhaust flame-thrower)
     
  5. Determined

    Determined Guest

    "gabrielle" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > On Sat, 03 May 2003 17:30:16 -0700, determined wrote:
    >
    > > I wound up taking my 6 yr old nephew with me, so I decided to do something reasonable for my
    > > first time out. We took the bike trail from Bonneville Dam to Cascade Locks on the old hwy... I
    > > coulda swore it was uphill both ways...
    >
    > The section between HR and Mosier is uphill both ways as well. ;)
    >
    > I've been meaning to take the Mr. on the section you rode today--we can see some of the waterfalls
    > from I-84 and it's always intrigued me. Though I didn't realize there were stairs. I was aware of
    > a set between Eagle Creek and Bonneville; where are the others?

    Oh, that's them... There's about 4 levels of concrete stairs, with a side groove for the bike
    tires.... I had to carry mine down and his. And I swear his bike is twice as heavy as mine, and only
    half the size!

    Betsy (determined)
     
  6. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    Technician wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >> Bike shorts really are a must,,, if nothing else the pad keeps your butt (or whatever) from
    >> getting saddle sore. Over your shorts you could wear some sort of light wicking tights. The key
    >> is a "wicking" synthetic... these fabrics move moisture away from your body so that the moisture
    >> evaporates, and also will insulate you when the fabric is damp-ish. Cotton does none of these
    >> things - it hold moisture against your skin promoting heat loss, chilling and eventually
    >> hypothermia.
    >>
    >
    > In cooler weather, you can get hypothermia, but in the hot weather, you can get heatstroke as you
    > can't evaporate the sweat off.
    >
    > ~Travis

    <shakes head....>

    penny
     
  7. Jd

    Jd Guest

  8. Ctg

    Ctg Guest

    "determined" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I wound up taking my 6 yr old nephew with me, so I decided to do something reasonable for my
    > first time out. We took the bike trail from Bonneville Dam to Cascade Locks on the old hwy... I
    > coulda swore it was uphill both ways... And carrying 2 bikes down 4 flights of stairs was fun....
    > But lunch at the Charburger is always worth it, especially with those giant cookies they make!
    > The entire thing is paved, and there are some great views of the river, the dam and some
    > waterfalls. the noise of I-84 is deafening at times, but a nice little ride anyways, about 7-8
    > miles round trip.
    >
    > One thing I realized is that clothing is pretty important. I don't have
    any
    > biking specific clothing. I wore workout pants a tank and a hooded sweatshirt. It was cold
    > outside, so I was sweating and freezing at the
    same
    > time. What would be a good clothing base for riding?

    As someone else said get bike shorts, they seem pricey at first, most start around $50, but they're
    worth it for the comfort and good ones will last a long time if you take care of them. For tops
    you'll want something synthetic, anything from a poly wicking tee from any outdoor store will do or
    you can get a bike specific jersey, this will run anywhere between $15-70 depending on what and
    where you get it. Avoid cotton if you're doing anything longer than around the neighborhood.

    Chris
     
  9. Zilla

    Zilla Guest

    Wal-mart had some polyester T-shirts for $7.00. They work as well as the $20+ shirts you see in LBS.

    --
    - Zilla (Remove XSPAM)

    "ctg" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "determined" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > I wound up taking my 6 yr old nephew with me, so I decided to do
    something
    > > reasonable for my first time out. We took the bike trail from
    Bonneville
    > > Dam to Cascade Locks on the old hwy... I coulda swore it was uphill
    both
    > > ways... And carrying 2 bikes down 4 flights of stairs was fun.... But lunch at the Charburger is
    > > always worth it, especially with those giant cookies they make! The entire thing is paved, and
    > > there are some great views of the river, the dam and some waterfalls. the noise of I-84 is
    > > deafening at times, but a nice little ride anyways, about 7-8 miles
    round
    > > trip.
    > >
    > > One thing I realized is that clothing is pretty important. I don't have
    > any
    > > biking specific clothing. I wore workout pants a tank and a hooded sweatshirt. It was cold
    > > outside, so I was sweating and freezing at the
    > same
    > > time. What would be a good clothing base for riding?
    >
    > As someone else said get bike shorts, they seem pricey at first, most
    start
    > around $50, but they're worth it for the comfort and good ones will last a long time if you take
    > care of them. For tops you'll want something synthetic, anything from a poly wicking tee from any
    > outdoor store will do or you can get a bike specific jersey, this will run anywhere between
    $15-70
    > depending on what and where you get it. Avoid cotton if you're doing anything longer than around
    > the neighborhood.
    >
    > Chris
     
  10. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    JD wrote:
    > "determined" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<lP%[email protected]>...
    >> Betsy
    >
    > Too bad Penny called you a dude.
    >
    > JD no insomnia, just dawn patrol

    Ooops., that would be "dudette" then... <g>

    penny
     
  11. Gabrielle

    Gabrielle Guest

    On Sat, 03 May 2003 20:30:25 -0700, determined wrote:

    > "gabrielle" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    >> Though I didn't realize there were stairs. I was aware of a set between Eagle Creek and
    >> Bonneville; where are the others?
    >
    > Oh, that's them... There's about 4 levels of concrete stairs, with a side groove for the bike
    > tires.... I had to carry mine down and his. And I swear his bike is twice as heavy as mine, and
    > only half the size!

    Yeah, those stairs are a doozy.

    If you get out farther east and want to do the Twin Tunnels section (HR to Mosier) let me know and
    I'll meet you there. :)

    gabrielle
     
  12. Determined

    Determined Guest

    "gabrielle" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > On Sat, 03 May 2003 20:30:25 -0700, determined wrote:
    >
    > > "gabrielle" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > >> Though I didn't realize there were stairs. I was aware of a set between Eagle Creek and
    > >> Bonneville; where are the others?
    > >
    > > Oh, that's them... There's about 4 levels of concrete stairs, with a side groove for the bike
    > > tires.... I had to carry mine down and his. And I swear his bike is twice as heavy as mine, and
    > > only half the size!
    >
    > Yeah, those stairs are a doozy.
    >
    > If you get out farther east and want to do the Twin Tunnels section (HR to Mosier) let me know and
    > I'll meet you there. :)

    Oh, that'd be cool! Next Saturday maybe?
     
  13. B. Sanders

    B. Sanders Guest

    "determined" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I wound up taking my 6 yr old nephew with me, so I decided to do something reasonable for my first
    > time out. We took the bike trail from Bonneville Dam to Cascade Locks on the old hwy...

    Sounds like a beautiful ride. Thanks for reminding me that I need to take some kids out on rides.
    Nothing more rewarding than teaching kids the joys of cycling.

    > One thing I realized is that clothing is pretty important. I don't have
    any
    > biking specific clothing. I wore workout pants a tank and a hooded sweatshirt. It was cold
    > outside, so I was sweating and freezing at the
    same
    > time. What would be a good clothing base for riding?

    Here's what you need:

    Walmart sells some nice moisture-wicking t-shirts for like $10. Nashbar.com and PerformanceBike.com
    sell nice Dupont CoolMax jerseys for under $30 (I have 4 of them). There are lots of other sources.
    I like Coolmax fabric; but there are many other types with similar properties.

    Cycling shorts are an important item. They provide much-needed padding, muscle support, and moisture
    wicking. Almost any padded Lycra/nylon cycling-specific shorts are going to work. Nashbar.com and
    PerformanceBike.com both offer several shorts for under $30/pr (on sale). I recommend an 8oz fabric,
    8-panel construction, hopefully with a premium-quality pad (also called a "chamois", because cycling
    shorts used to be wool, with a chamois leather insert). The Nashbar "Millenium" and "Canyon" shorts
    looks like a good choice for the money, to me. (Nashbar accepts returns with no hassles, which keeps
    me coming back year after year.)

    Once you get your polyester moisture wicking base layer, you can wear just about anything over it.
    For cool weather (above 50 F) I recommend a light, windproof vest (sleeveless jacket) and a pair of
    Lycra or polypro arm warmers (about $20). I find that combo to be very effective and maximally
    versatile. Pearl Isumi makes an excellent windproof vest with open mesh fabric on the back for
    maximum moisture control. This combo will keep you warm and dry when you're really crankin'. Don't
    worry if you feel a tad bit cool at first - you'll start generating heat and feel much warmer once
    you're underway. You should probably also have a thin rain jacket folded up in your seatbag or
    pocket (jerseys and most jackets/vests have pockets).

    I also have a nice set of wind-resistant Helly Hansen unpadded tights. They were like $50. I wear
    them over my padded shorts when the temperature drops below 55 degrees or so, and they're
    comfortable all the way down to about 25
    F. Below 25 F, I wear another thin layer of tights, or a pair of loose polyester running pants.
    Works great.

    Hope this helps. You'll enjoy cycling much more with cycling-specific clothing. It's money
    well spent.

    Cheers,

    Barry Sanders
     
  14. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Technician wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > >> Bike shorts really are a must,,, if nothing else the pad keeps your butt (or whatever) from
    > >> getting saddle sore. Over your shorts you could wear some sort of light wicking tights. The key
    > >> is a "wicking" synthetic... these fabrics move moisture away from your body so that the
    > >> moisture evaporates, and also will insulate you when the fabric is damp-ish. Cotton does none
    > >> of these things - it hold moisture against your skin promoting heat loss, chilling and
    > >> eventually hypothermia.
    > >>
    > >
    > > In cooler weather, you can get hypothermia, but in the hot weather, you can get heatstroke as
    > > you can't evaporate the sweat off.
    > >
    > > ~Travis
    >
    > <shakes head....>
    >
    > penny
    >
    >
    >

    That's it, this is the last non-RR i will ever post. Obviously nothing i say is of any value, or is
    incorrect.

    ~Travis
    --
    travis57 at megalink dot net

    Personal Website: http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/ travis5765.homelinux.net, Primary Administrator
    TF Custom Electronics, Owner/Founder/Developer (current project: Automotive exhaust flame-thrower)
     
  15. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    Technician wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >> Technician wrote:
    >>> In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >>>> Bike shorts really are a must,,, if nothing else the pad keeps your butt (or whatever) from
    >>>> getting saddle sore. Over your shorts you could wear some sort of light wicking tights. The key
    >>>> is a "wicking" synthetic... these fabrics move moisture away from your body so that the
    >>>> moisture evaporates, and also will insulate you when the fabric is damp-ish. Cotton does none
    >>>> of these things - it hold moisture against your skin promoting heat loss, chilling and
    >>>> eventually hypothermia.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> In cooler weather, you can get hypothermia, but in the hot weather, you can get heatstroke as
    >>> you can't evaporate the sweat off.
    >>>
    >>> ~Travis
    >>
    >> <shakes head....>
    >>
    >> penny
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    > That's it, this is the last non-RR i will ever post. Obviously nothing i say is of any value, or
    > is incorrect.
    >
    > ~Travis

    well it's incorrect. misinformation. wrong... it was suggested before, stick to things you know
    something about or check a health/first aid referenece before you connect the keyboard with your
    brain. I checked the outdoor emergency care manual, page 434 to confirm or deny heatstroke
    information.

    PS
     
  16. Ctg

    Ctg Guest

    "Zilla" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Wal-mart had some polyester T-shirts for $7.00. They work as well as the $20+ shirts you
    > see in LBS.

    Yeah, my brother got some good wicking tees at Dick's (a sporting goods chain) for around $10,
    cheaper than my $20 Zoic tees, but I've had them for 2-3 years now and they are still going strong,
    no ripping, pilling or anything else. Just a little stretch around the collar. I'm happy with how
    long they've lasted so far.

    Chris
     
  17. "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote
    > Technician wrote:
    > >
    > > That's it, this is the last non-RR i will ever post. Obviously nothing i say is of any value, or
    > > is incorrect.
    > >
    > > ~Travis
    >
    > well it's incorrect. misinformation. wrong...

    Penny, Trav is a world renowned expert on wilderness survival,

    nonproliferation, genetics, biophysics, English literature, fencing (he sports a Heidelberg scar),
    special forces tactics, fifth-century Chinese poetry, nuclear nonproliferation, Tuscan cuisine,
    abstract expressionism, and topology. Learn from the master.

    CC
     
  18. Gabrielle

    Gabrielle Guest

    On Sun, 04 May 2003 12:04:52 -0700, determined wrote:

    > "gabrielle" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    >> Yeah, those stairs are a doozy.
    >>
    >> If you get out farther east and want to do the Twin Tunnels section (HR to Mosier) let me know
    >> and I'll meet you there. :)
    >
    > Oh, that'd be cool! Next Saturday maybe?

    Our big Saturday Market is starting up this Sat but I can go in the afternoon. If you decide you
    want to do it, drop me an email at gab AT gorge DOT net.

    gabrielle
     
  19. Spider

    Spider Guest

    gabrielle <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Sun, 04 May 2003 12:04:52 -0700, determined wrote:
    >
    >
    > > "gabrielle" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > >> Yeah, those stairs are a doozy.
    > >>
    > >> If you get out farther east and want to do the Twin Tunnels section (HR to Mosier) let me know
    > >> and I'll meet you there. :)
    > >
    > > Oh, that'd be cool! Next Saturday maybe?
    >
    > Our big Saturday Market is starting up this Sat but I can go in the afternoon. If you decide you
    > want to do it, drop me an email at gab AT gorge DOT net.

    Do you have a stall there? If so, we may have already met, LOL!

    Spider
     
  20. Spider

    Spider Guest

    [email protected] (Corvus Corvax) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    <snip>

    >
    > Penny, Trav is a world renowned expert on wilderness survival,

    > nonproliferation, genetics, biophysics, English literature, fencing (he sports a Heidelberg scar),
    > special forces tactics, fifth-century Chinese poetry, nuclear nonproliferation, Tuscan cuisine,
    > abstract expressionism, and topology. Learn from the master.

    He's a double-expert in nuclear nonproliferation? Wow! That must have taken *years* to learn!

    ;)

    Spider
     
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