First Ride Report



J

Jeff

Guest
Actually, covers a couple of firsts: First ride of the calendar year
and first ride on the new bike.

The Bike:
Kona Dew Plus with added fenders and rack. Added a flashing rear light
to the rack.

The Ride:
It was a short ride (or two short rides) commuting to and from work.
About 3.5KM each way. The morning ride was at -11C. Ice patches on the
road. Lots of sand. A little snow still on some of the side streets.
I should have worn my toque (wool cap) as my ears got cold. The air was
lovely and crisp.
The ride home was about -4C but very sunny and not much wind. In the
sun, it was fine. Some puddles. Some ice. Lots of sand. Traffic was
a bear.

The Good:
The bike feels great. Much lighter than the previous bike (old Mongoose
MTB). I really hate suspension. I love disk brakes. I love having a
rack (really beats riding with a backpack). Free indoor parking right
next to the parking attendant's booth.

The Bad:
The front fender is rubbing on the tire. I'll have to take it back to
the dealer and get it adjusted.
 
Z

Zoot Katz

Guest
On Wed, 19 Mar 2008 21:40:20 -0500, Jeff <[email protected]>
concluded:

>The Bad:
>The front fender is rubbing on the tire. I'll have to take it back to
>the dealer and get it adjusted.



The smallest percentage of bike/car collisions occur from behind.
Most hazards and potential conflicts are in front of you.

Adjusting the clearance of a fender is something a cyclist should be
able to do with a minimal tool kit.. It's usually a compromise
between tire clearance and toe-overlap.

I remember your wanting an off-the-hook fully equipped bike and
hoping to avoid any fettling of your own. Perhaps my attitude is
different. I see bicycles as unstoppable because they are so ruggedly
simple that most problems are obvious, their solutions are self
explanatory and usually can be remedied en route. It's terrifically
empowering to gain those small bits of knowledge. Practice changing
inner tubes at home before having to do it along the road.
--
zk
 
T

Tom Keats

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
Zoot Katz <[email protected]> writes:


> I see bicycles as unstoppable because they are so ruggedly
> simple that most problems are obvious, their solutions are self
> explanatory and usually can be remedied en route.


That's why I generally carry a bunch of zip ties
with me. Except last week I got caught off guard
as my rear fender wanted to ride up the rear wheel
when rolling the bike backward. No sweat, I just
walked a block to the nearest dollar store and
bought yet another bunch of zip ties, and used one
to retether the bottom of the rear fender to that
little bridge thingy behind the bottom bracket.

I guess my Planet Bike Freddie Fenders have lasted
about 8 years now (when was the last Transit strike?)
They even still have their cute li'l mudflaps on 'em.
I've killed a number of metalized plastic SKS's on
other bikes during that interim. But I had to do some
nasty mods to 'em to get 'em to fit around Vee-brakes.
After the fact, I learnt of my across-the-lane, bike shop
wrench, neighbour's nifty li'l trick of melting discrete
little holes in the fenders with something like a cheap-o
Radio Shack 15W soldering pencil, to run the noodles through.
Oh, well. Vee-brakes are for real mountain bikes that
neither need nor want fenders, not city runabouts.

Anyways, since Jeff's beautiful new whip is so new, I
expect it's got some warrantee stuff on it. Might as
well take it to the shop for tweaks. I expect a good shop
would want it back after a while for a follow-up check of
cable stretch and unusual wears & tears, etc. Maybe Jeff
can watch what they do, and ask questions about general
maintenance. And besides, he'd get the opportunity to
once again enjoy the ambience of a bike shop (the olfactory
aspects of which I've deduced to consist of the fragrance
of packing grease so predominant in old-school, heavily
timber'd floor hardware stores, combined with the
quasi-organic aroma of fresh tire rubber.)

> It's terrifically
> empowering to gain those small bits of knowledge. Practice changing
> inner tubes at home before having to do it along the road.


Heh. I have many bittersweet memories of performing
roadside repairs in the pouring rain.


cheers,
Tom

--
Nothing is safe from me.
I'm really at:
tkeats curlicue vcn dot bc dot ca
 
J

Jeff

Guest
Tom Keats wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>,
> Zoot Katz <[email protected]> writes:
>
>
>> I see bicycles as unstoppable because they are so ruggedly
>> simple that most problems are obvious, their solutions are self
>> explanatory and usually can be remedied en route.

>
> That's why I generally carry a bunch of zip ties
> with me. Except last week I got caught off guard
> as my rear fender wanted to ride up the rear wheel
> when rolling the bike backward. No sweat, I just
> walked a block to the nearest dollar store and
> bought yet another bunch of zip ties, and used one
> to retether the bottom of the rear fender to that
> little bridge thingy behind the bottom bracket.
>
> I guess my Planet Bike Freddie Fenders have lasted
> about 8 years now (when was the last Transit strike?)
> They even still have their cute li'l mudflaps on 'em.
> I've killed a number of metalized plastic SKS's on
> other bikes during that interim. But I had to do some
> nasty mods to 'em to get 'em to fit around Vee-brakes.
> After the fact, I learnt of my across-the-lane, bike shop
> wrench, neighbour's nifty li'l trick of melting discrete
> little holes in the fenders with something like a cheap-o
> Radio Shack 15W soldering pencil, to run the noodles through.
> Oh, well. Vee-brakes are for real mountain bikes that
> neither need nor want fenders, not city runabouts.
>
> Anyways, since Jeff's beautiful new whip is so new, I
> expect it's got some warrantee stuff on it. Might as
> well take it to the shop for tweaks. I expect a good shop
> would want it back after a while for a follow-up check of
> cable stretch and unusual wears & tears, etc. Maybe Jeff
> can watch what they do, and ask questions about general
> maintenance. And besides, he'd get the opportunity to
> once again enjoy the ambience of a bike shop (the olfactory
> aspects of which I've deduced to consist of the fragrance
> of packing grease so predominant in old-school, heavily
> timber'd floor hardware stores, combined with the
> quasi-organic aroma of fresh tire rubber.)
>
>> It's terrifically
>> empowering to gain those small bits of knowledge. Practice changing
>> inner tubes at home before having to do it along the road.

>
> Heh. I have many bittersweet memories of performing
> roadside repairs in the pouring rain.
>
>
> cheers,
> Tom
>


Even better, the LBS is in the process of moving to a location more than
5 times the size of the current location. Lots of stuff on sale.

I'm not very handy (changing a light bulb is cause for celebration). In
their new location, the LBS is hoping to offer basic maintenance
classes, so I'm hoping to take some.
 
Z

Zoot Katz

Guest
On Thu, 20 Mar 2008 20:13:20 -0500, Jeff <[email protected]>
wrote:

>>> It's terrifically
>>> empowering to gain those small bits of knowledge. Practice changing
>>> inner tubes at home before having to do it along the road.

>>
>> Heh. I have many bittersweet memories of performing
>> roadside repairs in the pouring rain.
>>
>>
>> cheers,
>> Tom
>>

>
>Even better, the LBS is in the process of moving to a location more than
>5 times the size of the current location. Lots of stuff on sale.
>
>I'm not very handy (changing a light bulb is cause for celebration). In
>their new location, the LBS is hoping to offer basic maintenance
>classes, so I'm hoping to take some.


Riding a bicycle helps free us from limitations we put on ourselves.
That's what still makes it a radical thing to do.

Bicycles teach us in subtle ways. They can guide and carry us to
personal achievements undreamt by our pre-cycling selves.
--
zk
 
T

Tom Keats

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
Zoot Katz <[email protected]> writes:

> Bicycles teach us in subtle ways. They can guide and carry us to
> personal achievements undreamt by our pre-cycling selves.


Best of all, they can get us home after a rough day,
like a milk-wagon horse that knows every stop by heart.

And yeah, if something goes awry, we don't have to
confusedly gawk at an hodge-podge of fuel injectors
and other fancy techno-razzmatazz. We don't have to
hog an whole lane of roadway with the hood raised as
a signal to other road/street users that our vehicular
corpse needs to be somehow pushed aside like a dead
rhinoceros so other people can continue to proceed.

Bicycles are so beautifully conducive to sociability
and independence. The sort of independence car drivers
/think/ they have, until they have to call [C|A]AA.


cheers,
Tom

--
Nothing is safe from me.
I'm really at:
tkeats curlicue vcn dot bc dot ca
 
C

catzz66

Guest
Zoot Katz wrote:
> >

> Riding a bicycle helps free us from limitations we put on ourselves.
> That's what still makes it a radical thing to do.
>
> Bicycles teach us in subtle ways. They can guide and carry us to
> personal achievements undreamt by our pre-cycling selves.


I don't think about it as much as some of you. I just like to ride. I
am not too handy either, but it is easy to learn to fix flats, clean and
lube your chain, adjust your brakes, change brake pads and so on.
Otherwise, my bikes would sit for weeks before it was convenient for me
to take them in to some shop. I do have two bikes. They are not the
same setup, but if one breaks down, I can ride the other one till I fix
what's broken. I take them to the shop as an absolute last resort.

The most disturbing thing about the original post is that he has not
ridden since the new year. I don't ride as much when it is cold and
rainy, but I enjoy riding too much to lay off for months at a time. I
hope he can get into riding where he enjoys it that much.
 
J

Jeff

Guest
catzz66 wrote:
> Zoot Katz wrote:
>> > Riding a bicycle helps free us from limitations we put on ourselves.

>> That's what still makes it a radical thing to do.
>>
>> Bicycles teach us in subtle ways. They can guide and carry us to
>> personal achievements undreamt by our pre-cycling selves.

>
> I don't think about it as much as some of you. I just like to ride. I
> am not too handy either, but it is easy to learn to fix flats, clean and
> lube your chain, adjust your brakes, change brake pads and so on.
> Otherwise, my bikes would sit for weeks before it was convenient for me
> to take them in to some shop. I do have two bikes. They are not the
> same setup, but if one breaks down, I can ride the other one till I fix
> what's broken. I take them to the shop as an absolute last resort.
>
> The most disturbing thing about the original post is that he has not
> ridden since the new year. I don't ride as much when it is cold and
> rainy, but I enjoy riding too much to lay off for months at a time. I
> hope he can get into riding where he enjoys it that much.


Oh, I do enjoy it that much. The layoff was mostly due to road/weather
conditions and the lack of a bike suitable to those conditions.
Winnipeg winters are on the extreme end of things. Cycling is possible,
but it does require care and forethought and a certain amount of discretion.

The new bike is, hopefully, better suited to winter riding than was the
old bike. For one thing, it is the proper size, so coming off the
saddle in a hurry presents less of a risk of going from bass to soprano.
It also has a rack, which makes for a much more comfortable commute
than the rackless old bike.
 
C

catzz66

Guest
Jeff wrote:
>
>
> Oh, I do enjoy it that much. The layoff was mostly due to road/weather
> conditions and the lack of a bike suitable to those conditions. Winnipeg
> winters are on the extreme end of things. Cycling is possible, but it
> does require care and forethought and a certain amount of discretion.
>
> The new bike is, hopefully, better suited to winter riding than was the
> old bike. For one thing, it is the proper size, so coming off the
> saddle in a hurry presents less of a risk of going from bass to soprano.
> It also has a rack, which makes for a much more comfortable commute
> than the rackless old bike.


I'd have to join a spin class if I lived where you do, Jeff. I realize
how nice it is to be able to ride most every day. Good luck to you.