First time hybrid buyer

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by m1kebeck, Jun 4, 2014.

  1. m1kebeck

    m1kebeck New Member

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    Im new to riding looking for a good hybrid bike mostly using on hilly roads and light trails and some long commutes. I have an amazon store credit card so I want to purchase on there and I know not all the brands are sold online. I was trying to decide between a few different diamondback bikes heres a few..
    diamondback 2014 Insight STI-8 Performance Hybrid Bike Diamondback 2014 Trace Comp Dual Sport Bike diamondback 2014 insight 2 hybrid bike Im not set on anything I just have been searching the diamondbacks because the other brands on amazon I have not heard of so any suggestions on something else would be great. I don't know much about them and would like some help to steer me in the right direction for a good reliable bike my price range is in the 5-600$ rang Thanks in advance!!
     
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  2. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    I'm more familiar with the derailleur equipped (3x7 speed) version of this bike, and I think that one's an excellent value.

    8-speed internally geared hubs are expensive, so this one pushes envelope for a price-point bike. Before pulling the plug I suggest checking out some similar bikes at your local shops. Decide if the 8-speed hub is worth the extra $250 over a derailleur equipped bike, or if the money might be better spent on a lighter frame or not spent at all. Two lines of similar bikes are the Trek FX series and the Specialized Sirrus series. With derailleurs, the entry level to this bikes starts around $460.

    And if you order online, factor in the cost of having the bike built by a local shop.
     
  3. Owboduz

    Owboduz New Member

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    Do be aware that the FX 7.0 and 7.1 both have freewheels, not freehubs, which limits your options, should you decide to replace the cassette. The FX 7.2 has an 8-speed freehub cassette, so you have more options should you want to change the cassette.

    I've heard good things about the Raleigh Miseco. Again, though, the 1.0 has a freewheel and the 2.0 has a freehub.
     
  4. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely. Besides giving more gearing options, the freehub design produces a stronger and more durable hub. Buyers who are not under tight budget constraints and intend to ride a lot should by all means consider the upgraded models.
     
  5. Owboduz

    Owboduz New Member

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    Agreed. I would just say that it's important to do your research. When I got caught by the freewheel trap, I didn't know what to look for in a bike. Now, a year later, I know a little more and I'm prepared to do a lot more research.
     
  6. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    While the preceding is TRUE, a Freewheel is not as constraining as some people think ...

    • I suspect that for the majority of riders, the Cassette and/or Freewheel which comes on the bike they have either is never changed/replaced with one which has the same range OR never replaced with one whose Cogs have a different range ...

    • So, while the limitations which a Freewheel presents in the modern context is a legitimate issue for some riders, I have to believe that for many people it is a satisfactory compromise which the industrious cyclist can overcome by buying a Shimano ACERA-or-better hub & re-lacing the rim onto it, etc. ... skill level will seem like 5-out-of-5 for a newbie
    • but, is probably closer to only a 3-out-of-5 for an experienced DIYer
     
  7. ambal

    ambal Active Member

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    Is there a reason why it's stronger/more durable? I've had a few fail.
     
  8. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Yes. The bearing on right (drive) side is closer to the outboard end of the axle where the axle is less prone to deflection, and the load on the two bearings is more evenly distributed.

    Wheel bearings succumb to various causes--heavy loads, hard impacts, grime, a cone loosening, lack of lubrication, . . . In my observation, the most common one is the loosening cone--always on the drive side, the rider ignores the wobbly rear wheel, then the balls are cutting a new race through the axle, and eventually the only thing holding the wheel together is the quick release skewer fastened to the dropout.

    Of course, cones loosen on front wheels too, but riders seem to suspect something's wrong before the axle fails completely.

    I'm sure there are more hub failure stories out there, and I am also sure somebody is getting ready to tell me I'm full of shit.

    And, for the record, I have two wheels with 7-speed freewheels for a road bike that I ride occasionally, often on dirt roads, that are over 30 years old. I take care of my equipment.
     
  9. Owboduz

    Owboduz New Member

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    Information is not a bad thing. Riders should be aware of the limitations of the kit they're buying BEFORE the purchase. If they conclude that the limitations are not a problem, that's fine, but the awareness is key.
     
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