First TT - Blown away, and now what?

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by 9202, Jul 1, 2007.

  1. 9202

    9202 New Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2007
    Messages:
    130
    Likes Received:
    0
    So I recently did my first 10 mile TT. The field was composed of about 20 riders. Without getting into age groups and such, I had the 3rd slowest time. That is I came in 17 out of 20.

    Since this is my first, and I have only been riding for a few months I am not too upset. I averaged 18mph over the 10 mile out and back course. The fastest person averages 25mph.

    Now where do I start to get faster and stronger......?
     
    Tags:


  2. daveryanwyoming

    daveryanwyoming Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2006
    Messages:
    3,857
    Likes Received:
    97
    Good deal getting out and riding your first TT. They're tough, but can be really rewarding. Stick with it and you'll get faster.

    I have no idea what kind of training you've been doing, how often, how long on each ride, how intense, what your sports background is. But general advice would be to ride frequently like 4 to 5 days a week. Do some time trial like efforts on a couple of those days. Not necessarily full blown kill ya efforts like you might do in a race but a couple of 15 to 25 minute efforts where you ride steady and hard till you get to deep steady focused breathing. Rest five to ten minutes between these efforts and do at least two in a session then cool down and call it good. Do some days at an easier pace but don't just roll around looking at the scenery, ride at least easy tempo where you are riding quick but comfortably for your current fitness. Match a couple of days per week of that with some good on or off bike rest days.

    Surf these forums for more specific advice, but it's all a matter of steady ramped training sufficiently hard to encourage fitness adaptations but not so hard it wipes you out matched with some rest days where your body can actually rebuild and get stronger. That and of course do more time trials to get experience and to learn about pacing.

    Good luck,
    Dave
     
  3. mullerrj

    mullerrj New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2007
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey, I did my first 10 mi. TT two weeks ago and was actually surprised at my result- averaging almost 24 mph. I could have averaged 24 except I stopped/coasted 1/4 mi. before the end of it because there was a woman on the side of the road with a stopwatch and I thought that was the finish and "officially" came in at 23.6 mph. I think what was key for me is pacing myself correctly..not starting out too fast, and finishing strong, near my max HR. I also found out, a week after, that my aero position was NOT so aero..so knowing what I know now..probably could go faster...albeit, not that much faster. It's DEFINITELY a learning experience. Don't despair, learn from it. Have someone look at your position on your bike. Did you have a power meter when you TT'd? That would definitely help tell me whether 18 mph was about right for you. Good luck with it in the future. I'm still learning too..so perhaps we can help each other. Rob
     
  4. j.r.hawkins

    j.r.hawkins New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2007
    Messages:
    229
    Likes Received:
    0
    Get yourself a copy of Joe Friel's The Cyclist's Training Bible. You'll learn a new word - periodization - that will improve your results and keep you away from overtraining, illness and burnout.

    Buy yourself a HR monitor as well. You can get some quite good ones without spending the eqivalent of an arm and a leg, and they really help with pacing so you don't overtrain.
     
  5. 9202

    9202 New Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2007
    Messages:
    130
    Likes Received:
    0
    Appreciate the comments and encouragement.....

    OK, so there is nothing more sobering than to get your bottom kicked.

    I got to the time trial at 6:15am. Registration was 6:30am. I then rode one 3 mile lap to warm up, I was called at 7:00am to start.

    Starter gave me the go, I clipped in and got a good start. The course was comprised of 3 - 3 mile laps. First lap went well, I was spinning about 85RPM, (large chain ring and middle rear gear). No wind and I was able to maintain 17 MPH. Second lap I was sweating pretty good, I drank a whole bottle of Cytomax before starting. The wind began to kick up and my outward leg dropped to 16.2 mph. Began third lap, I began to push, speed into the wind was 17.5, a bit better than lap 2. I had 1.5 miles to go, began to work harder, speed over the last mile was 21.5. Thighs were burning, hands numb, sweat was poring off of me, it was already 84F and about 80% humidity. Finish line was in sight, pushed as hard as I could.........did a slow cool down lap.

    Time 00:35:04.

    There were 20 people racing, I finished 17. Not good, I beat a 14 year old kid and an older guy, and who knows who else. maybe someone walking ;-)

    Most people had Time Trial bikes with rear disks and aero bars, skinsuits, and those fancy space helmets. Me, I rode in the drops but could not ride that fast, 53 years old and still losing weight, down to 210 from 245.

    The fastest two people were a guy and a gal. The guy's time was 00:24:45 and the woman's time was 00:26:50. Actually gave me quite a bit of inspiration, not sure I will ever be that fast, but it was a great day.

    So that was that.......I loved it!
    For the next race I have a lot of training to do.

    Maybe I was concentrating on too high an RPM and not concentrating on building strength is a lower gear. I will definitly get that training book.

    Thanks
     
  6. Uhl

    Uhl New Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2003
    Messages:
    99
    Likes Received:
    0
    It sounds like you were on a standard road bike, riding in the drops, right? Then don't try to compare your time to people on full-on TT bikes and aero wheels...you'll always be disappointed. :( It really makes a huge difference, probably around 1-3 MPH faster with an aero position and equipment.

    So until you get a TT bike, just work on improving your time relative to your prior times. In regards to doing that, you've already been given some good advice above, and there's plenty more if you search the forums (LT intervals, SST, time trials, etc).
     
  7. dkrenik

    dkrenik Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2003
    Messages:
    440
    Likes Received:
    8
    There's lots of great information in this forum. As there are certain parts of fitness that best aid TT performance I recommend searching for SST, FTP, LT, and such.

    You've already received good advice from respected members of this forum. Take the time to acquaint yourself with some of the more "nuts-n-bolts" aspects of cycling fitness.

    Good luck,
    Dave
     
  8. 9202

    9202 New Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2007
    Messages:
    130
    Likes Received:
    0
    Excellent, and thanks, everyone here has been a great help.
     
  9. wakarusaslowrcr

    wakarusaslowrcr New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2006
    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    0
    Do an internet search for Time Trial Strategies as well. There are several good articles on how to approach the race, preparation, training etc. Another good source besides the Joe Friel book is one called Bike Racing 101. It covers all types of road racing but it also includes how to train, a section on Time Trials etc. Just good gase knowledge that each of us in the learning phases of TT's should be aware of.

    A strategy that I have been using of late and it appears to be working as my times are improving is to run the race in thirds. First third of the race is at a pace that there is no question you can maintain, 2nd third is ramped up a bit and then the last section is whatever you have left. I gauge this from heart rate data and having tested for my aerobic threshold. I'm really starting to enjoy TT's as yes I am racing the other racers but I'm really racing myself against that ticking stop watch.......

    James
     
  10. mullerrj

    mullerrj New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2007
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    0
    James..that makes two of us..I applied the same strategy on my TT and had positive results. Good stuff!
     
  11. wakarusaslowrcr

    wakarusaslowrcr New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2006
    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    0
    Mullerrj,
    I can't claim any ownership of that strategy as I'm working with an online coach and it is how he has me approach the race. The 20k yesterday was my longest TT to date and it worked very well. The best piece of equipment that I own is my heart rate monitor.....plain and simple. It lets me know exactly where I am at any time with my effort....takes some time to do the testing and get in tune with it but after that....invaluable imho.

    James
     
  12. AndROOb

    AndROOb New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2004
    Messages:
    224
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi there,
    I'm 45 and in my 4th season of time trialling. I am regularly participating in events with guys your age and older, who are faster than me.
    The time you clocked is now your benchmark - anyone elses time is irelevant.
    My advice to you would be to do some sessions on the course where you've done the time trial, but do one lap as fast as you can, instead of three. Try to do one lap at an average speed of 20mph. Then take a 5-10 minute breather, then do it again. Once you can maintain 20mph average 'fairly' easily:eek: , try to complete 2 laps at 20mph average. Can you see where I'm going?
    Use this strategy to build your speed, and then sustain it for longer durations.

    At the other end of the scale, once a week get out for a 2-3hr ride(if possible), and ride it at a fairly brisk pace - not full on, but fast-ish.

    My other recommendation would be to buy some cheap bolt-on TT/tri bars, and watch your time improve by 30-60 seconds just by using them for the TT.
    If you get the TT bug, and you probably will, consider buying a purpose built frame, as this will help you to get a much more aerodynamic position but make sure to get the right size TT frame, which is generally slightly smaller than a normal road frame.

    Above all, enjoy it:)
     
  13. 9202

    9202 New Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2007
    Messages:
    130
    Likes Received:
    0
    Excellent direction and help. Thanks alot, I appreciate everyones candid thoughts. I agree and will work harder than ever.
     
  14. rayhuang

    rayhuang New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2006
    Messages:
    522
    Likes Received:
    0
    #1-proffesional bike fit, even if it costs a lot of money or takes a long drive to find a qualified shop/person. There are some "do it yourself" online stuff thats helpful if budget or other reasons prevent you form doing this.


    #2-coach if your serious about racing or your fitness. I would guess if you get hooked like many of us do-you'll overtrain, especially since your new and want to improve.

    #3-specific to TT. Aero helmet and stubby clip-ons. These are worth minute or minutes and also happen to be the least expensive (for once). If your local bike shop is good and has a good fit person, have a seperate seatpost and saddle just for time trialing. It will more than likely be a seat with a wider, softer nose, pushed all the way forward and maybe a bit higher than your standard road position. Mark your road and TT seat posts with electrical tape so you can easily swapthem in and out without screwing up or remeasuring. This forward position allows you to be in a more aero position without your knees hitting your stomach. BUT-WARNING_Handling is compromised so practice before racing and never ride in a group like this.

    My 0.02

    Ray
     
  15. Roy.C

    Roy.C New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2004
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    As a 55 year old rider I found a big improvement came by having 2 hard training turbo sessions per week (plus other easier ones!)
    1. work on leg stregth-heavy gear, low cadence (65-80), HR around 75-85% of max HR for at least 30 minutes, 1 hour if you can.
    2. lactic threshold work - 3 x 5 min intervals at LT, (for me this is 90-93% of max HR - could be lower for you depending on fitness level), at cadence >100 with 5 min rests in between, then 6 sets of 2 minutes each (no rests in between) at a HR 5 beats lower than your LT alternating between high and low cadence, keeping power constant. You will obviously have to change gear or resistance to achieve this. Warning-you should find this session v hard!

    Make sure you warm up for at least 10 mins & cool down properly.
     
Loading...
Loading...