fitness and brain function

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by pedalchick, Feb 19, 2004.

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  1. pedalchick

    pedalchick New Member

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  2. Curt

    Curt Guest

    Although,
    > through anecdotal evidence in this forum, I would postulate that the opposite is true...

    Excellent!

    Curt
     
  3. pedalchick wrote:

    > Somebody should do a peer-reviewed study on athletes to see if increased fitness helps cognitive
    > function in younger people. Although, through anecdotal evidence in this forum, I would postulate
    > that the opposite is true...
    >
    > http://www.cnn.com/2004/HEALTH/02/17/fit.thinking.ap/index.htmlhttp://w-
    > ww.cnn.com/2004/HEALTH/02/17/fit.thinking.ap/index.html

    Rik O'Shea (possibly not his real name) posted a quote from CHris Boardman along the lines that the
    mindset of a champion is very close to mental illness.

    It's been a concern among coaches here in NZ for a while that young champion athletes do not have
    balanced lifestyles. However, as one coach pointed out, if they did have balanced lifestyles, they
    probably wouldn't be champion athletes.
     
  4. Sam

    Sam Guest

    I think some of the posting on this and other boards support the idea that
    exercise does nothing for brain function :)

    "pedalchick" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Somebody should do a peer-reviewed study on athletes to see if increased fitness helps cognitive
    > function in younger people. Although, through anecdotal evidence in this forum, I would postulate
    > that the opposite is true...
    >
    > http://www.cnn.com/2004/HEALTH/02/17/fit.thinking.ap/index.htmlhttp://w-
    > ww.cnn.com/2004/HEALTH/02/17/fit.thinking.ap/index.html
    >
    >
    >
    > --
     
  5. Gwhite

    Gwhite Guest

    pedalchick wrote:
    >
    > Somebody should do a peer-reviewed study on athletes to see if increased fitness helps cognitive
    > function in younger people. Although, through anecdotal evidence in this forum, I would postulate
    > that the opposite is true...

    Perfect. Grungi is an anecdotal case. He played sports and it took him ten years to get a liberal
    arts degree. Based on him, I say sport makes a person dumber.
     
  6. Tim Lines

    Tim Lines Guest

    pedalchick wrote:

    > Somebody should do a peer-reviewed study on athletes to see if increased fitness helps cognitive
    > function in younger people. Although, through anecdotal evidence in this forum, I would postulate
    > that the opposite is true...

    What do you mean by that? Huh? I don't understand.
     
  7. Chris

    Chris Guest

    What we have here is apples being compared to carrots. I think you're confusing cognitive function
    with motivation/competitive desire. Moreover, you can neither draw conclusions about function in
    young people from research on athletes, nor can you draw any hypotheses based on the fact that young
    have difficulty concentrating.

    The problem here is that you're trying to compare old people who perform moderate exercise to young,
    highly trained athletes who, it could be argued, exercise too much to begin with. While the research
    appears to be lacking in the area (I ran a free medline search), I would argue that long term
    training (young athlete) has no effect, or perhaps a positive effect if you tested the individual in
    a well rested state.

    In my search, though, I did learn that preliminary longitudinal studies in dicate that heavy
    marijuana use has no long-term cognitive effects. See, I found it here: http://intapp.medscape.com/-
    px/medlineapp/getdoc?ord=16&searchid=2&have_local_holdings_file=1&local_journals_only=0&searchstrin-
    g=increased+fitness+helps+cognitive+function+in+younger+people

    pedalchick <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Somebody should do a peer-reviewed study on athletes to see if increased fitness helps cognitive
    > function in younger people. Although, through anecdotal evidence in this forum, I would postulate
    > that the opposite is true...
    >
    > http://www.cnn.com/2004/HEALTH/02/17/fit.thinking.ap/index.htmlhttp://w-
    > ww.cnn.com/2004/HEALTH/02/17/fit.thinking.ap/index.html
    >
    >
    >
    > --
     
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