Fitting bar ends, to cut or not

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Colin Swan, Aug 8, 2003.

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  1. Colin Swan

    Colin Swan Guest

    OK, let's get it clear to start with, I've got bar ends, I had them on my old bike, I use them a lot
    and I am going to fit them, so please no debate about the merits or otherwise of them :)

    I say that because Googling for an answer to this showed that someone asked this before and the only
    response was "bar ends are crap, don't fit them!", which isn't very helpful IMO...

    Anyway, my question is as follows:

    I am fitting clamp-type bar ends to my 03 Rockhopper Disk, which has end caps integral to the grips.
    I'm therefore going to have to cut the end of the grips off, but do I cut some of the grip off too,
    move the levers and shifters, or both? On my old Marin Hawk Hill, I think I did a combination, but I
    just wondered whether there was an accepted correct way of doing it, or whether it was down to
    personal preference.

    While in a questioning mood, I am new to disk brakes, and while I find them very good, I am a little
    disappointed that the front one is a bit noisy, making a regukar metallic scrape that makes the bike
    sound cheap. Will this go as the pads bed in? I have only put about 20 road miles on it so far...

    Any helpful comments gratefully received :)

    Regards,

    Colin Swan Nildram Operations
     
    Tags:


  2. Slash

    Slash Guest

    On Fri, 08 Aug 2003 11:04:33 +0100, Colin Swan <colin AT nildram DOT
    net> scribbled:

    >OK, let's get it clear to start with, I've got bar ends, I had them on my old bike, I use them a
    >lot and I am going to fit them, so please no debate about the merits or otherwise of them :)
    >
    >I say that because Googling for an answer to this showed that someone asked this before and the
    >only response was "bar ends are crap, don't fit them!", which isn't very helpful IMO...
    >
    >Anyway, my question is as follows:
    >
    >I am fitting clamp-type bar ends to my 03 Rockhopper Disk, which has end caps integral to the
    >grips. I'm therefore going to have to cut the end of the grips off, but do I cut some of the grip
    >off too, move the levers and shifters, or both? On my old Marin Hawk Hill, I think I did a
    >combination, but I just wondered whether there was an accepted correct way of doing it, or whether
    >it was down to personal preference.

    Like everything in life, it all boils down to personal preference. I just chopped the ends off my
    grips and slapped some Profile Design bar ends on. They came with plastic end caps to fill the
    exposed bar ends. I didn't even move my shifters or brake levers because, in a further fashion
    faux pas, I put these bar ends on a riser bar. The hand space is now a little narrower, but it's
    still comfortable for me. If you have a flat bar, moving the levers should be fairly easy if you
    need to do that.

    >While in a questioning mood, I am new to disk brakes, and while I find them very good, I am a
    >little disappointed that the front one is a bit noisy, making a regukar metallic scrape that makes
    >the bike sound cheap. Will this go as the pads bed in? I have only put about 20 road miles on it
    >so far...

    I don't run discs myself, but from what I hear they usually require a bit of break-in period. I'd
    run them another 100 miles or so and see if they clear up. Be sure to ride through mud, they like
    that. All else failing, EBC Green pads are apparently recommended. I'm sure someone else with actual
    experience will fill you in.

    >Any helpful comments gratefully received :)
    >
    >
    >Regards,
    >
    >Colin Swan Nildram Operations

    -Slash
    --
    "Ebert Victorious"

    - The Onion
     
  3. Colin Swan

    Colin Swan Guest

    On Fri, 08 Aug 2003 02:16:37 -0800, Slash <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>I am fitting clamp-type bar ends to my 03 Rockhopper Disk, which has end caps integral to the
    >>grips. I'm therefore going to have to cut the end of the grips off, but do I cut some of the grip
    >>off too, move the levers and shifters, or both? On my old Marin Hawk Hill, I think I did a
    >>combination, but I just wondered whether there was an accepted correct way of doing it, or whether
    >>it was down to personal preference.
    >
    >Like everything in life, it all boils down to personal preference. I just chopped the ends off my
    >grips and slapped some Profile Design bar ends on. They came with plastic end caps to fill the
    >exposed bar ends. I didn't even move my shifters or brake levers because, in a further fashion
    >faux pas, I put these bar ends on a riser bar. The hand space is now a little narrower, but it's
    >still comfortable for me. If you have a flat bar, moving the levers should be fairly easy if you
    >need to do that.

    Thanks for that - have the Profile ends too, mainly because they have a thinner clamp. I think I'll
    try simply cutting down the grips, after making sure I can still get my hand in. So is it not
    fashionable to have ends on riser bars then? :)

    >>While in a questioning mood, I am new to disk brakes, and while I find them very good, I am a
    >>little disappointed that the front one is a bit noisy, making a regukar metallic scrape that makes
    >>the bike sound cheap. Will this go as the pads bed in? I have only put about 20 road miles on it
    >>so far...
    >
    >I don't run discs myself, but from what I hear they usually require a bit of break-in period. I'd
    >run them another 100 miles or so and see if they clear up. Be sure to ride through mud, they like
    >that. All else failing, EBC Green pads are apparently recommended. I'm sure someone else with
    >actual experience will fill you in.

    As I thought - good excuse to get some miles in though. I have some friends with run sports cars
    (Lotus Elise, Noble M12), their brake pad of choice is EBC Greenstuff, and they were quite amused to
    see that I can get the same for my bike!

    Regards,

    Colin Swan Nildram Operations
     
  4. "Colin Swan" <colin AT nildram DOT net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > OK, let's get it clear to start with, I've got bar ends, I had them on my old bike, I use them a
    > lot and I am going to fit them, so please no debate about the merits or otherwise of them :)
    >
    > I say that because Googling for an answer to this showed that someone asked this before and the
    > only response was "bar ends are crap, don't fit them!", which isn't very helpful IMO...
    >
    > Anyway, my question is as follows:
    >
    > I am fitting clamp-type bar ends to my 03 Rockhopper Disk, which has end caps integral to the
    > grips. I'm therefore going to have to cut the end of the grips off, but do I cut some of the grip
    > off too, move the levers and shifters, or both? On my old Marin Hawk Hill, I think I did a
    > combination, but I just wondered whether there was an accepted correct way of doing it, or whether
    > it was down to personal preference.
    >

    If there is no plug in the end of your handlebars, all you have to do is gently (okay start gently
    and work up) tap the end of the grip against the end of the bar with a hammer. This should easily
    cut out a nice hole which fits the bar prefectly. Move your brakes/shifters in board half an inch,
    push the grips up and fit bar-ends. Voila.

    > While in a questioning mood, I am new to disk brakes, and while I find them very good, I am a
    > little disappointed that the front one is a bit noisy, making a regukar metallic scrape that makes
    > the bike sound cheap. Will this go as the pads bed in? I have only put about 20 road miles on it
    > so far...

    You will need to use them for longer to properly bed them in, however if they are scraping you may
    need to fuss about with shims etc to re-align the disc within the caliper.

    > Any helpful comments gratefully received :)

    No problem,

    Steve.
     
  5. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    spademan o---[) * wrote:

    > If there is no plug in the end of your handlebars, all you have to do is gently (okay start gently
    > and work up) tap the end of the grip against the end of the bar with a hammer. This should easily
    > cut out a nice hole which fits the bar prefectly. Move your brakes/shifters in board half an inch,
    > push the grips up and fit bar-ends. Voila.

    This is the way to do it, but depends on you having enough room inboard to shift everything in
    (everything's a bit cramped on my narrow bars). Also, bear in mind that in this situation, your
    natural hand position will be further towards the middle, so you'll lose a bit of control. Wider
    bars are the order of the day.

    --
    a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm

    b.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  6. Bob M

    Bob M Guest

    On Fri, 08 Aug 2003 14:57:40 +0200, bomba <[email protected]> wrote:

    > spademan o---[) * wrote:
    >
    >> If there is no plug in the end of your handlebars, all you have to do is gently (okay start
    >> gently and work up) tap the end of the grip against the end of the bar with a hammer. This should
    >> easily cut out a nice hole which fits the bar prefectly. Move your brakes/shifters in board half
    >> an inch, push the grips up and fit bar-ends. Voila.
    >
    > This is the way to do it, but depends on you having enough room inboard to shift everything in
    > (everything's a bit cramped on my narrow bars). Also, bear in mind that in this situation, your
    > natural hand position will be further towards the middle, so you'll lose a bit of control. Wider
    > bars are the order of the day.
    >

    Would you lose control or gain control? It makes sense to me that you steer slower with wider bars
    and faster with narrower bars. If "control" means that you want slower response to steering input,
    then go for wider bars.

    --
    Bob M in CT Remove 'x.' to reply
     
  7. T_blood

    T_blood Guest

    > > spademan o---[) * wrote:
    > >
    > >> If there is no plug in the end of your handlebars, all you have to do
    is
    > >> gently (okay start gently and work up) tap the end of the grip against the end of the bar with
    > >> a hammer. This should easily cut out a nice hole which fits the bar prefectly. Move your
    > >> brakes/shifters in board half an
    inch,
    > >> push the grips up and fit bar-ends. Voila.
    > >
    > > This is the way to do it, but depends on you having enough room inboard to shift everything in
    > > (everything's a bit cramped on my narrow bars). Also, bear in mind that in this situation, your
    > > natural hand position will be further towards the middle, so you'll lose a bit of control. Wider
    > > bars are the order of the day.
    > >
    >
    > Would you lose control or gain control? It makes sense to me that you steer slower with wider bars
    > and faster with narrower bars. If "control" means that you want slower response to steering input,
    > then go for wider bars.

    That's a question I have frequently asked myself. My HT has a closer grip and seems to respond
    quicker on the technical single track, my FS has a wider grip and seems to not. However on
    fast downhill I prefer the wider grip, might be totally psychological but I feel I have more
    control then.
     
  8. > That's a question I have frequently asked myself. My HT has a closer grip and seems to respond
    > quicker on the technical single track, my FS has a wider grip and seems to not. However on
    > fast downhill I prefer the wider grip, might be totally psychological but I feel I have more
    > control then.

    It's not psychological. It's physics.

    Take your front wheel. Spin it with your hand on the spokes, close to the hub. You had to exert some
    effort. Now, stop the wheel and then spin it again, but this time at the rim. You had to exert less
    effort, no? It's torque. The farther you are away from the axis of rotation, the more force you have
    on the system and the more angular acceleration you will have.

    In terms of your bars, think of your steerer as your axis of rotation (analogous to the hub on the
    wheel). Having your hands close to the stem is like rotating the wheel near the hub. It's hard for
    you to control the bike when wheel deflections can throw your control off, but if you hold the
    bars near the ends, then you've got more control because you can effect more torque per unit of
    effort exerted.

    Does that make sense? I'm not usually very good at explaining things.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  9. Voodoo

    Voodoo Guest

    "Colin Swan" <colin AT nildram DOT net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > So is it not fashionable to have ends on riser bars then? :)
    >
    People may think you're a "Fred" (I think they call them Barneys now), but if that is what you want,
    and what you like, who cares what they think, right? Put those barends on.

    Me personally, I loved riding behind my pals with barends, just to watch them take that occasional
    sudden exit from the trail when they snagged something, then laugh at them. After all, they had
    plenty laughs at my own expense. :)

    voodoo - who sometimes forgets to unclip when he stops
     
  10. T_blood

    T_blood Guest

    > Does that make sense? I'm not usually very good at explaining things.
    >

    Of course it makes sense, it was just that my reaction seems quicker with the short grip on tight
    stuff, and I feel more in control with a wider grip on faster, a bit wider, wreck and die stuff.
     
  11. Bob M

    Bob M Guest

    On Fri, 8 Aug 2003 18:50:19 +0200, T_Blood <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >> Does that make sense? I'm not usually very good at explaining things.
    >>
    >
    > Of course it makes sense, it was just that my reaction seems quicker with the short grip on tight
    > stuff, and I feel more in control with a wider grip on faster, a bit wider, wreck and die stuff.
    >
    >
    >

    I think you're right. Perhaps longer bars but with long grips would suffice? Then, when it's fast
    and nasty, you put your hands on the ends; when it's slow but tight, you switch toward the middle.

    --
    Bob M in CT Remove 'x.' to reply
     
  12. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    Colin Swan <colin AT nildram DOT net> wrote:

    > I'm therefore going to have to cut the end of the grips off, but do I cut some of the grip off
    > too, move the levers and shifters, or both? On my old Marin Hawk Hill, I think I did a
    > combination, but I just wondered whether there was an accepted correct way of doing it, or whether
    > it was down to personal preference.

    I'd leave it at personal preference. When I used to do more dodging trees in the relatively flat and
    fast northeastern US, I liked the bars short. That gave me more margin between the trees (still, not
    always enough... ouch), and it really didn't seem to inhibit the control of the bike.

    Here in the more technical, steeper, rockier southwestern US, I like wider bars. They allow me to
    exert more force on the front end when a rock is telling me to go one way and my head disagrees.

    And I personally like bar ends, if that matters (I know it really doesn't). I run my bars "XC low",
    and like the lower, longer position on fast fire roads and when climbing long, steep sections. I
    could just hunker forward more and bend my elbows more - but where's the fun in that? ;-)

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
     
  13. Colin Swan

    Colin Swan Guest

    On Fri, 8 Aug 2003 11:46:26 -0500, "voodoo" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Colin Swan" <colin AT nildram DOT net> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> So is it not fashionable to have ends on riser bars then? :)
    >>
    >People may think you're a "Fred" (I think they call them Barneys now), but if that is what you
    >want, and what you like, who cares what they think, right? Put those barends on.

    Not sure what a "Fred" or a "Barney" is - perhaps an American term that hasn't made it over to the
    UK? Anyway, I fitted them at the weekend by cutting the very ends of the grips off, moving the
    brakes and shifters in and sliding the grips. Haven't had a chance to ride it like this yet as I
    didn't get time (and it was too hot), but should be about the same setup that I'm used to. Does make
    the front of the bike look quite wide though, so maybe I'll try a flat bar at some point...

    >Me personally, I loved riding behind my pals with barends, just to watch them take that occasional
    >sudden exit from the trail when they snagged something, then laugh at them. After all, they had
    >plenty laughs at my own expense. :)
    >
    >voodoo - who sometimes forgets to unclip when he stops

    That's always a good one :)

    Regards,

    Colin Swan Nildram Operations
     
  14. Voodoo

    Voodoo Guest

    "Colin Swan" <colin AT nildram DOT net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Fri, 8 Aug 2003 11:46:26 -0500, "voodoo" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"Colin Swan" <colin AT nildram DOT net> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]...
    > >> So is it not fashionable to have ends on riser bars then? :)
    > >>
    > >People may think you're a "Fred" (I think they call them Barneys now),
    but
    > >if that is what you want, and what you like, who cares what they think, right? Put those
    > >barends on.
    >
    > Not sure what a "Fred" or a "Barney" is - perhaps an American term that hasn't made it over to the
    > UK? Anyway, I fitted them at the weekend by cutting the very ends of the grips off, moving the
    > brakes and shifters in and sliding the grips. Haven't had a chance to ride it like this yet as I
    > didn't get time (and it was too hot), but should be about the same setup that I'm used to. Does
    > make the front of the bike look quite wide though, so maybe I'll try a flat bar at some point...
    >
    Don't know if I would want to give up my riser just because it looked wider. When I first went from
    a 22" flat bar, to a 26" riser, it just felt_so_right. I'll never use a flat bar again.

    > >Me personally, I loved riding behind my pals with barends, just to watch them take that
    > >occasional sudden exit from the trail when they snagged something, then laugh at them. After all,
    > >they had plenty laughs at my
    own
    > >expense. :)
    > >
    > >voodoo - who sometimes forgets to unclip when he stops
    >
    > That's always a good one :)
    >
    Even better was the time I forgot to properly torque my new cranks. As I was looking at the crank
    arm hanging from my left shoe, I was, for the moment unsure what to do with it, and the thought
    never crossed my mind to un-clip with the right, so I just fell right over.
     
  15. Fireflyer

    Fireflyer Guest

    do you have midget hands? cut the end of the grip off, move everything in, shifters et al, then add
    bar ends. i gather you will never be asked to work on the space shuttle...

    "Colin Swan" <colin AT nildram DOT net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > OK, let's get it clear to start with, I've got bar ends, I had them on my old bike, I use them a
    > lot and I am going to fit them, so please no debate about the merits or otherwise of them :)
    >
    > I say that because Googling for an answer to this showed that someone asked this before and the
    > only response was "bar ends are crap, don't fit them!", which isn't very helpful IMO...
    >
    > Anyway, my question is as follows:
    >
    > I am fitting clamp-type bar ends to my 03 Rockhopper Disk, which has end caps integral to the
    > grips. I'm therefore going to have to cut the end of the grips off, but do I cut some of the grip
    > off too, move the levers and shifters, or both? On my old Marin Hawk Hill, I think I did a
    > combination, but I just wondered whether there was an accepted correct way of doing it, or whether
    > it was down to personal preference.
    >
    > While in a questioning mood, I am new to disk brakes, and while I find them very good, I am a
    > little disappointed that the front one is a bit noisy, making a regukar metallic scrape that makes
    > the bike sound cheap. Will this go as the pads bed in? I have only put about 20 road miles on it
    > so far...
    >
    > Any helpful comments gratefully received :)
    >
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    > Colin Swan Nildram Operations
     
  16. Dan

    Dan Guest

    On Fri, 08 Aug 2003 17:38:31 GMT, Bob M <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Fri, 8 Aug 2003 18:50:19 +0200, T_Blood <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>> Does that make sense? I'm not usually very good at explaining things.
    >>>
    >>
    >> Of course it makes sense, it was just that my reaction seems quicker with the short grip on tight
    >> stuff, and I feel more in control with a wider grip on faster, a bit wider, wreck and die stuff.
    >
    >I think you're right. Perhaps longer bars but with long grips would suffice? Then, when it's fast
    >and nasty, you put your hands on the ends; when it's slow but tight, you switch toward the middle.

    But you always want to have your hands ideally placed for the brakes and shifters. I switched from
    flat and narrow to riser and wide and the difference in control is amazing. Not only is the torque
    theory correct but it is much easier to get your hands to do the right amount of steering when they
    have to make wide movements. Just like it is much easier to put a piece of string through a one inch
    hole than a thread through a needle.

    In short, narrow bars are quicker but less accurate and thereby not ideal for technical riding.

    --
    [email protected] - Orange Patriot -03
     
  17. Colin Swan

    Colin Swan Guest

    On Mon, 11 Aug 2003 14:11:54 GMT, "fireflyer" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Colin Swan" <colin AT nildram DOT net> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> OK, let's get it clear to start with, I've got bar ends, I had them on my old bike, I use them a
    >> lot and I am going to fit them, so please no debate about the merits or otherwise of them :)
    >>
    >> I say that because Googling for an answer to this showed that someone asked this before and the
    >> only response was "bar ends are crap, don't fit them!", which isn't very helpful IMO...
    >>
    >> Anyway, my question is as follows:
    >>
    >> I am fitting clamp-type bar ends to my 03 Rockhopper Disk, which has end caps integral to the
    >> grips. I'm therefore going to have to cut the end of the grips off, but do I cut some of the grip
    >> off too, move the levers and shifters, or both? On my old Marin Hawk Hill, I think I did a
    >> combination, but I just wondered whether there was an accepted correct way of doing it, or
    >> whether it was down to personal preference.
    >
    >do you have midget hands? cut the end of the grip off, move everything in, shifters et al, then add
    >bar ends. i gather you will never be asked to work on the space shuttle...

    Thanks - that's what I did in the end, and it seems to work OK. I don't have wide hands, but have
    very long fingers, which makes it a pain to get gloves that fit. You're probably right about the
    Shuttle, but I don't think it will be anything to do with my hands :)

    Regards,

    Colin Swan Nildram Operations
     
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