Fitting lights to rear racks

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Clifford Griffi, Sep 27, 2003.

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  1. With the equinox now passed my thoughts are turning to lights for my commuting bike.

    Has anyone come across an effective way of fixing an led light to a rear rack. Many commuting bikes
    have racks and it would seem the most obvious place to fit them.

    Cliff
     
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  2. Clifford Griffiths wrote:

    > With the equinox now passed my thoughts are turning to lights for my commuting bike.
    >
    > Has anyone come across an effective way of fixing an led light to a rear rack. Many commuting
    > bikes have racks and it would seem the most obvious place to fit them.

    I bought a standard small steel L-bracket from B&Q; the holes are just the right distance apart for
    mudgard-fitting lights (e.g. the Cateye BSAU100). I blued it by heating it and dropping it in oil
    (which rustproofs things for a couple of years) then bolted it to the underside of the rack
    (Blackburn MTN). With a slight bend in it to make the lamp vertical, it looks made to measure.

    Some racks have a plate at the back with a hole for a reflector or a lamp, in which case it's much
    easier. For a seatpost-fitting lamp like the wide Cateye LD600, I really don't know how people do it
    without making a fancy custom bracket. Obvisouly the seatpost is a bad place for any lamp on a bike
    with a rack, unless you ride a particularly small frame and have enough post showing to clear any
    "rack pack".

    Roger
     
  3. Chris French

    Chris French Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Clifford Griffiths
    <[email protected]> writes
    >With the equinox now passed my thoughts are turning to lights for my commuting bike.
    >
    >Has anyone come across an effective way of fixing an led light to a rear rack. Many commuting bikes
    >have racks and it would seem the most obvious place to fit them.
    >
    Buy a sensible rack that comes with a mounting plate across the back drilled for the mounting holes
    common on European lamps ?

    for fitting to the rear of a rack lamps such as the Hella RL980B, the B*M Toplight, or the AXA
    optica really are the best as they fit neatly across the rack, usually include a good
    reflector as well.

    My Tubus Cargo rack has such a plate and mounting is simple, excellent rack to.

    <http://www.gearshift.co.uk/acatalog/Rear_Racks.html>

    Other alternatives:

    The classic bent 'Meccano strip' as used to be supplied for fitting the old Every Ready lamps

    You can by neater manufactured versions of the above, such as one by B&M, thyis is a good
    replacement for the fitted rear plate. and ECGE made a neat little aluminium bracket that clamped to
    the rear of a rack to take a lamp that bolts one like traditional rear bulbed dynamo lamps, it's
    still available, now made by ARC I think.

    You can see these on the SJSC site at:

    <http://www.sjscycles.com/store/vIndex.htm>

    SJSC also do a mounting bracket for LEDS like the Vistalite 5 LED, it's made for their own racks but
    with a 'Meccano strip' could be used for other lights.

    My AXA Optica came with a bracket to be fitted with 2 'P' clips to the rear of the rack to replace
    the mounting plate
    --
    Chris French, Leeds
     
  4. M Series

    M Series Guest

    Clifford Griffiths wrote:
    > With the equinox now passed my thoughts are turning to lights for my commuting bike.
    >
    > Has anyone come across an effective way of fixing an led light to a rear rack. Many commuting
    > bikes have racks and it would seem the most obvious place to fit them.
    >
    > Cliff

    My Blackburn rack had a small loop wrapped around the back horizontal member, the loop extended down
    and the reflecter was bolted onto it. My LED light has a threaded hole and a spiggot above so I made
    a new loop to which I attached the reflector then below it the light.
     
  5. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    Clifford Griffiths wrote:

    > Has anyone come across an effective way of fixing an led light to a rear rack. Many commuting
    > bikes have racks and it would seem the most obvious place to fit them.

    A rack with a built-in mounting is best, otherwise you can buy a variety of clips, most of which
    fall into two categories: cast or machined aluminium, which seem to last well, and pressed
    steel, which seem to fatigue and break after a period which could be anythign from a few months
    to a few years.

    If you use a pressed steel baracket I recommend making a safety loop for your lamp, by crimping two
    crimp terminals (of the ring variety), one to each end of a short length of brake inner. Loop it
    through the rack and put the lamp fixing screw through the two terminals. That way if the bracket
    fails you won't have to suffer the annoyance of standing there watchign a car drive over your lamp
    rather than stop for a second and let you retrieve it. DAMHIKIJKOK.

    Sometimes the lamp mounts close enough to the rack to use a standard P-clip instead of the safety
    wire idea.

    Best of all is definitely to get a rack with welded-on lamp brackets (some have glued-on brackets -
    these come off, too).

    --
    Guy

    Marvin is dead, long live Zaphod!
     
  6. Pete Milne

    Pete Milne Guest

    Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:
    > Clifford Griffiths wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Has anyone come across an effective way of fixing an led light to a rear rack. Many commuting
    >>bikes have racks and it would seem the most obvious place to fit them.

    Nearly all racks I see in mailland Europe have light-fitting plates. Why don't they all come like
    that in Britain? Mind you, any commuting bike over the water will normally come with rack &
    lights fitted.

    Pete
     
  7. Ian

    Ian Guest

    Just zis Guy, you know? must be edykated coz e writed:

    > Clifford Griffiths wrote:
    >
    >> Has anyone come across an effective way of fixing an led light to a rear rack. Many commuting
    >> bikes have racks and it would seem the most obvious place to fit them.
    >
    > A rack with a built-in mounting is best, otherwise you can buy a variety of clips, most of which
    > fall into two categories: cast or machined aluminium, which seem to last well, and pressed
    > steel, which seem to fatigue and break after a period which could be anythign from a few months
    > to a few years.
    >
    I drill the rack and use part of the lamp mounting bracket, an Allen bolt and a Nylock nut.

    --
    Ian

    http://www.catrike.co.uk
     
  8. Chris French

    Chris French Guest

    In message <BB9B9E3C.12046%[email protected]>, Ian <[email protected]> writes
    >Just zis Guy, you know? must be edykated coz e writed:
    >
    >> Clifford Griffiths wrote:
    >>
    >>> Has anyone come across an effective way of fixing an led light to a rear rack. Many commuting
    >>> bikes have racks and it would seem the most obvious place to fit them.
    >>
    >> A rack with a built-in mounting is best, otherwise you can buy a variety of clips

    >I drill the rack and use part of the lamp mounting bracket, an Allen bolt and a Nylock nut.
    >
    Having managed to bend a Blackburn rear rack, break a Blackburn front lowrider rack, and break a
    Nimrod rear rack in various places I'd steer clear of drilling any holes in my racks.
    --
    Chris French, Leeds
     
  9. Tony R

    Tony R Guest

    "Zog The Undeniable" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]... For a
    seatpost-fitting lamp like
    > the wide Cateye LD600, I really don't know how people do it without making a fancy custom bracket.
    > Obvisouly the seatpost is a bad place for any lamp on a bike with a rack, unless you ride a
    > particularly small frame and have enough post showing to clear any "rack pack".
    >

    I've had a LD600 attached to a rack since this time last year. I just used the bracket it was
    supplied with shimmed out with the rubber strips also supplied. The strips allow the bracket to get
    a firm grip on the irregular
    (ie . not round) surface of the horizontal part at the top rear of the rack. The good people at
    Cateye designed the light so it can fit either horizontally or vertically into the bracket. So
    I can still mount the light as desired despite the bracket mount facing out to the side rather
    than up as it would if it were on the seatpost. It saw plenty of use last winter over some
    very uneven road surfaces and remained totally secure. And yes I know what is now bound to
    happen on Monday night. tony R
     
  10. Ian

    Ian Guest

    chris French must be edykated coz e writed:

    > In message <BB9B9E3C.12046%[email protected]>, Ian <[email protected]> writes
    >> Just zis Guy, you know? must be edykated coz e writed:
    >>
    >>> Clifford Griffiths wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Has anyone come across an effective way of fixing an led light to a rear rack. Many commuting
    >>>> bikes have racks and it would seem the most obvious place to fit them.
    >>>
    >>> A rack with a built-in mounting is best, otherwise you can buy a variety of clips
    >
    >> I drill the rack and use part of the lamp mounting bracket, an Allen bolt and a Nylock nut.
    >>
    > Having managed to bend a Blackburn rear rack, break a Blackburn front lowrider rack, and break a
    > Nimrod rear rack in various places I'd steer clear of drilling any holes in my racks.
    I've never had a problem, but then I'm an engineer and frame builder so my tool kit is rather
    extensive.

    --
    Ian

    http://www.catrike.co.uk
     
  11. James Annan

    James Annan Guest

    Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:

    > A rack with a built-in mounting is best, otherwise you can buy a
    variety of
    > clips, most of which fall into two categories: cast or machined
    aluminium,
    > which seem to last well, and pressed steel, which seem to fatigue and
    break
    > after a period which could be anythign from a few months to a few years.
    >

    Surely not! As Any Fule Kno, it's Aluminium that invariably fatigues and breaks, whereas Steel is
    Real. Or does that only apply to bike frames, and not the rest of the world:-?

    We have had a rack-mounted light, the mounting was solid but the light suffered through being
    occasionally kicked by the stoker. Now we have a seatpost-mounted ligt (the very bright Lumicycle
    LED light, highly recommended for lumicycle users). Sometimes a particularly full pannier obscures
    it a bit, but rear lights are not a legal requirement here (Japan) and any driver who cannot see a
    tandem with reflective bits is going to wrap themselves around a pedestrian, lamp-post or tree
    pretty quickly.

    James
     
  12. >Has anyone come across an effective way of fixing an led light to a rear rack.

    Mine stays put. On the rear reflector bracket that hangs off the back of the rack, I clipped an LED
    via its clothes mounting clip. Then with plastic string I wound the string round said bracket & LED
    clip, tying tight with several knots and hey presto - it's rock solid! Not exactly aesthetically the
    greatest fix, but it is effective and cheap :)

    Cheers, helen s

    ~~~~~~~~~~
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    h*$el***$$n*$d$ot$**s**i$$m*$m$**on**[email protected]*$$a**$*ol*$*.*$$c$om*$ by getting rid of the
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