Fittness Question

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Whykickamoocow, Feb 29, 2004.

  1. I am riding my bike for fittness, and to lose some weight. My question is, when I go for a bike ride
    on a hot day, I come back with my clothes drenched in sweat, however now that its a little cooler, I
    am coming back after the same level of riding, but with bugger all sweat. Am I still acheiving the
    same results even though I am not sweating as much ? Thanks
     
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  2. On Sun, 29 Feb 2004 08:43:23 +1000, "Whykickamoocow" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I am riding my bike for fittness, and to lose some weight. My question is, when I go for a bike
    >ride on a hot day, I come back with my clothes drenched in sweat, however now that its a little
    >cooler, I am coming back after the same level of riding, but with bugger all sweat. Am I still
    >acheiving the same results even though I am not sweating as much

    As you get fitter, and your body gets more efficient, you WILL sweat less for the same amount
    of effort.

    The indicator of whether a workout is doing you good (fitness wise) is supposed to be how long you
    spend above a certain percentage of your maximum heart rate. That percentage figure will vary
    depending on the expert, but I think it's somewhere around the 75% mark.

    What I found, as far as sweating goes, was that as I got fitter I started sweating earlier, but
    sweated less overall.

    Make sure, though, that the reason you're not sweating as much isn't because you're dehydrated.

    ---
    Cheers

    PeterC

    [Rushing headlong: out of control - and there ain't no stopping]
    [and there's nothing you can do about it at all]
     
  3. Andrew Swan

    Andrew Swan Guest

    Whykickamoocow wrote:
    > I am riding my bike for fittness, and to lose some weight. My question is, when I go for a bike
    > ride on a hot day, I come back with my clothes drenched in sweat, however now that its a little
    > cooler, I am coming back after the same level of riding, but with bugger all sweat. Am I still
    > acheiving the same results even though I am not sweating as much ? Thanks

    A confounding factor is that as you ride faster, the sweat evaporates faster due to increased
    airflow, so I don't think perceived sweating is a good workrate measure. If you're serious about
    riding for fitness, buy a heart rate monitor (HRM) - it doesn't have to be a fancy-shmancy one with
    zones, PC interface, etc., just something that tells you your current heart rate. If it doesn't come
    with a little booklet that gives you a clue about what HR to train at, go to your local library or
    search the Web for articles.

    Other methods (not as reliable) of measuring workrate include:
    - which gear you're in on a known stretch of road (this is only a relative measure, and the "norm"
    will change as you get stronger and lighter)
    - perceived workrate, i.e. how hard you think you're going, which is accurate most of the time,
    but as my HRM tells me, not *all* the time (sometimes 150 feels like hard work, sometimes 165
    feels cruisey).

    If you can afford ~$150, I'd suggest you get an HRM.

    P.S. Peter is right, your body gets better at dissipating heat as you get fitter. On your first
    few rides, you may have come back red-faced, but on later rides over the same route and in
    the same conditions, your skin colour would be much more normal.

    HTH,

    &roo
     
  4. jazmo

    jazmo New Member

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    Your body doesn't need to sweat as much at cooler temperatures. I also ride to an from work. I find that in the morning I'm not sweating much at all. If it's a warm/hot day on the ride home, I can barely get my jersey off it's so wet. So in my experience, the weather plays a huge part in how much you sweat (and hence how much you need to drink).
     
  5. flyingdutch

    flyingdutch New Member

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    I got caught out badly in this year's Alpine Classic

    virtually all my longer rides (100k+) are in the morning and rarely approach midday.
    The alpine classic had me finishing after 9:16 hours at 3 in the afternoon and I realised there was a huge flaw in all my training and that was not getting used to riding at the hottest part of the day. Really suffered on buffalo
     
  6. amirm

    amirm New Member

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    Perspiration rate/amount can be affected by several physiological and environmental factors. In addition, there is no feasible means to measure perspiration rate/amount quantitatively.

    A meaningful way to monitor your fitness is perhaps watching your average speed against your HR. Even this has to be done over large sample size, as the speed can be greatly affected by wind, heat, humidity, state of the bike, the state of body etc. So, I'm afraid that monitoring fitness is going to require some tools. Something that allows you track your performance and gives you numbers to crunch.


     
  7. Rob Woozle

    Rob Woozle Guest

    As an aside to this...are you riding in a t-shirt? They certainly keep you sweatier (more sweaty?)
    than perhaps some of the cycling or running tops that I have tried.

    Cheers, Rob

    "Whykickamoocow" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I am riding my bike for fittness, and to lose some weight. My question is, when I go for a bike
    > ride on a hot day, I come back with my clothes drenched in sweat, however now that its a little
    > cooler, I am coming back after the same level of riding, but with bugger all sweat. Am I still
    > acheiving the same results even though I am not sweating as much ? Thanks
     
  8. "Peter Cremasco" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    > As you get fitter, and your body gets more efficient, you WILL sweat less for the same amount
    > of effort.

    <snip>

    > What I found, as far as sweating goes, was that as I got fitter I started sweating earlier, but
    > sweated less overall.

    Someone with a stronger biology/physiology background may be able to verify this, but I seem to
    recall that as you get fitter you actually sweat more.

    The key is that, yes you do sweat earlier. Your body perspires freely while you are exercising, it
    cools you down as it dries, and you arrive feeling cooler, not red, dripping and done in. Because
    you are sweating more, a fit person will need to drink as much or more than an unfit person. So suck
    on that bidon.

    Cheers Peter
     
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