five day wild walks in Scotland

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Dave W, Feb 18, 2004.

  1. Dave W

    Dave W Guest

    can anyone recommend a five-day wild walk in Scotland, wild camping and bothying, staying away from
    civilisation and taking in mucho spectacular scenery. We're going up again in March and having done
    the same in the Great Wilderness at Easter and Torridon in December we're looking for
    inspiration...thanks
     
    Tags:


  2. On 18 Feb 2004 13:36:16 -0800, [email protected] (dave w) wrote:

    >can anyone recommend a five-day wild walk in Scotland, wild camping and bothying, staying away from
    >civilisation and taking in mucho spectacular scenery. We're going up again in March and having done
    >the same in the Great Wilderness at Easter and Torridon in December we're looking for
    >inspiration...thanks

    You could use the train from Tyndrum to get to Corrour Halt and from there either walk over the
    hills around Ben Alder to Culra Bothy (not done that but know a man who has) or walk north past the
    head of Loch Treig to the Larig Leacach bothy then up over the Grey Corries ridge - done that but it
    wasn't in March. It was wild and snowy on the ridge though, in May.

    Picture from that trip on

    http://community.webshots.com/scripts/editPhotos.fcgi?action=showMyPhoto&albumID=77849124&photoID=1-
    18834068&security=hrTNYB

    Larig Leacach itself is not that inaccessible, but the country to the west of it is pretty wild. I
    believe there's another bothy en route through to Glen Nevis from Loch Treig ...... Meanach IIRC
    which would be at GR 266685 on the Ben Nevis OS 1:50K.

    We walked from Larig Leacach up to the bealach between Stob Ban and Stob Coire Claurigh, camped
    there and climbed Stob Ban in the evening, then walked over the Grey Corries ridge next day, minus
    Sgurr Coinnich Beag. The memorable bit of the day was the descent along the course of the Allt Coire
    an Eoin which becomes a mighty river draining Aonach Beag and a good bit of the Grey corries. It's
    superbly scenic, and as wild and remote as you could wish, with a spectacular waterfall at GR 224757
    that would have tea rooms and coach parks if it were near a road. After that, it's forest tracks and
    the river is much reduced by a dam. You can get the train back to Tyndrum from Spean Bridge.

    Course there's always majestic Knoydart - but that's a bit busy these days maybe?

    Paul Leigh Lancs
     
  3. >When I select that link I get;
    >
    >"An error has occurred.
    >
    >You do not appear to be the owner of this album. Make sure you are logged in"
    >
    >?????
    >
    >Stuart.

    Soz

    Try

    http://community.webshots.com/photo/77849124/118834068hrTNYB

    didn't realise the URL is different when you are logged in as the owner of the picture.....

    Not that it's a great picture, but it's an example of what Scotland was like in May in the 1990s!

    Paul
     
  4. Katherine

    Katherine Guest

    Stuart Robinson wrote:

    >>Picture from that trip on
    >>
    >>http://community.webshots.com/scripts/editPhotos.fcgi?action=showMyPhoto
    >>&albumID=77849124&photoID=118834068&security=hrTNYB
    >>
    >
    > When I select that link I get;
    >
    > "An error has occurred.
    >
    > You do not appear to be the owner of this album. Make sure you are logged in"
    >
    > ?????
    >
    > Stuart.
    >

    Ditto,

    Katherine
     
  5. "dave w" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > can anyone recommend a five-day wild walk in Scotland, wild camping and bothying, staying away
    > from civilisation and taking in mucho spectacular scenery. We're going up again in March and
    > having done the same in the Great Wilderness at Easter and Torridon in December we're looking for
    > inspiration...thanks
    West coast of Jura?? There's enough there for 5 days, depending on how fast you walk. Rarely see
    anybody else. Saw 6 otters on my last trip, June 2003. Cheers Graham
     
  6. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    dave w wrote:
    > can anyone recommend a five-day wild walk in Scotland, wild camping and bothying, staying away
    > from civilisation and taking in mucho spectacular scenery. We're going up again in March and
    > having done the same in the Great Wilderness at Easter and Torridon in December we're looking for
    > inspiration...thanks

    Start at Poolewe, wander in towards Carnmore, make it up as you go along for 5 days...

    Or, around Inverpolly, start at Lochinver, wander in towards Suileag, make it up as go along
    for 5 days...

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  7. Rj Webb

    Rj Webb Guest

    >Start at Poolewe, wander in towards Carnmore, make it up as you go along for 5 days...
    >
    >Or, around Inverpolly, start at Lochinver, wander in towards Suileag, make it up as go along for
    >5 days...

    Sheet 25

    Start at Achnasheen, Achnashellach or Strathcarron (Railway stations) and head southwards for
    Kintail or the Cluanie Inn (bus). Plenty to do in between.

    Or start at Achnasheen and head north for Poolewe or Gairloch. Just gawp at all those
    Torridonian goodies.

    Richard Webb
     
  8. Steve

    Steve Guest

  9. Mark Fraser

    Mark Fraser Guest

    "Graham Bowers" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "dave w" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > can anyone recommend a five-day wild walk in Scotland, wild camping and bothying, staying away
    > > from civilisation and taking in mucho spectacular scenery. We're going up again in March and
    > > having done the same in the Great Wilderness at Easter and Torridon in December we're looking
    > > for inspiration...thanks
    > West coast of Jura?? There's enough there for 5 days, depending on how fast you walk. Rarely see
    > anybody else. Saw 6 otters on my last trip, June 2003. Cheers Graham

    Rum is another fantastic place where you can easily spend 5 days, made to feel all the more remote
    by using the trasfer boat. Anyone know if they have finished building the pier yet?

    One walk I planned until work got in the way was ferry to Inverie, few days in Knoydart then walk
    east and south finishing in Glenfinnan. Lots of hills and remote glens plus you can bothy all the
    way. One day I'll go back and do it.

    Mark.
     
  10. Norrie Shand

    Norrie Shand Guest

    Excellent suggestion. Did a three day version of this last year:

    In from Poolewe over Corbetts of Beinn Airigh Charr and Beinn Lair to Carnmore. "Barn" at Carnmore
    is pretty decent - we weren't sure what to expect.

    Day 2 - over Chaisgein Beag/Mor to Shenevall - brilliant setting. Day 3 Beinn Dearg Mor and Beag (on
    the top at 9.00 am in the most brilliant day imaginable) and out to Corrie Halle.

    We'd done the Fisherfield Munros previously but they would be an excellent alternative to what we
    did using same bases.

    Could easily extend to five days - especially if you need to return to Poolewe for car.

    Norrie

    "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > Start at Poolewe, wander in towards Carnmore, make it up as you go along for 5 days...
    >

    > Pete.
    > --
    > Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells
    > Hospital Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    > http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  11. Andyp

    Andyp Guest

    "dave w" <[email protected]> wrote

    > can anyone recommend a five-day wild walk in Scotland, wild camping and bothying, staying away
    > from civilisation and taking in mucho spectacular scenery. We're going up again in March and
    > having done the same in the Great Wilderness at Easter and Torridon in December we're looking for
    > inspiration...thanks

    For me the Cairngorms have always had a good feel to them as a place to wander about for a few days.
    I find the fact that you can make up the route as you go along gives a sense of lazy freedom that
    you don't get on an A to B type backpack. Don't think it's got much in the way of good bothies
    though from the ones I've seen.
     
  12. Andyp

    Andyp Guest

    "Paul Richardson" <[email protected]> wrote

    > We walked from Larig Leacach up to the bealach between Stob Ban and Stob Coire Claurigh, camped
    > there and climbed Stob Ban in the evening, then walked over the Grey Corries ridge next day, minus
    > Sgurr Coinnich Beag. The memorable bit of the day was the descent along the course of the Allt
    > Coire an Eoin which becomes a mighty river draining Aonach Beag and a good bit of the Grey
    > corries. It's superbly scenic, and as wild and remote as you could wish, with a spectacular
    > waterfall at GR 224757 that would have tea rooms and coach parks if it were near a road.

    Every time I've been up in the Grey Corries I've thought the Allt Coire an Eoin would be a great
    place to visit. Is there much of any kind of path down there? I'd prefer it if there wasn't. Good
    places for pitching a tent?
     
  13. On Sat, 21 Feb 2004 23:47:24 -0000, "AndyP"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >Every time I've been up in the Grey Corries I've thought the Allt Coire an Eoin would be a great
    >place to visit. Is there much of any kind of path down there? I'd prefer it if there wasn't. Good
    >places for pitching a tent?
    >

    Andy it's really a magical place - at least in my memory! Loads of places you could camp - my
    recollection is of a succession of widenings of the glen as you descend, punctuated by rocky narrows
    with waterfalls ..... endless glorious plunge pools though in that May it would have stopped your
    heart or frozen your assets to have used them! A lot of it, at least lower down, was grassy rather
    than the usual peat-hag-heather theme. All dominated by the superb beetling ridges of Aonach Beag.

    I don't remember there being much of a path at all at any point, though this is now 10 years ago. I
    have certainly always wanted to go back there, but there's so much else to do!

    It's really much more of a genuine "Lost Valley" than the smaller scale (!) version under Bidean.
    It's quarantined of course by the high ridges on 3 sides and by all that forest between it and
    Spean Bridge.

    Highly recommended place to visit, and I don't even think there's much danger in advertising it on
    here - only the connosieurs will ever get there!!

    :))

    Paul Leigh Lancs
     
  14. AndyP

    AndyP Guest

    "Paul Richardson" <[email protected]> wrote

    > Highly recommended place to visit, and I don't even think there's much danger in advertising it on
    > here - only the connosieurs will ever get there!!

    Sounds like an excellent place to go and explore and stay a while on a fine summer's day. Corries
    and valleys often hold more interest for me than peaks and ridges. Following a mountain stream along
    it's course and discovering the everchanging succession of pools and falls is always a delight.

    Talking of 'lost valleys', the last time we visited the one of that name in Glencoe we clambered
    back down the boulders where the stream disappears underground rather than take the path. There's
    a lovely place where the water reappears again which if I remember rightly you get to by crawling
    under a rock and emerging on a flat platform by a deep swirling pool...nice spot for someone to
    try and find.
     
  15. David C.

    David C. Guest

    "AndyP" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "dave w" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    > > can anyone recommend a five-day wild walk in Scotland, wild camping and bothying, staying away
    > > from civilisation and taking in mucho spectacular scenery. We're going up again in March and
    > > having done the same in the Great Wilderness at Easter and Torridon in December we're looking
    > > for inspiration...thanks
    >
    > For me the Cairngorms have always had a good feel to them as a place to wander about for a few
    > days. I find the fact that you can make up the route as you go along gives a sense of lazy freedom
    > that you don't get on an A to B type backpack. Don't think it's got much in the way of good
    > bothies though from the ones I've seen.

    I wouldn't want to be a party pooper - but isn't the weather a bit rough to go walking in the
    Cairngorms in March??? David Cass
     
  16. Ihave never walked before, however I feel I would like to try it now but I would like to know
    more about it

    Paul Richardson <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 18 Feb 2004 13:36:16 -0800, [email protected] (dave w) wrote:
    >
    > >can anyone recommend a five-day wild walk in Scotland, wild camping and bothying, staying away
    > >from civilisation and taking in mucho spectacular scenery. We're going up again in March and
    > >having done the same in the Great Wilderness at Easter and Torridon in December we're looking for
    > >inspiration...thanks
    >
    > You could use the train from Tyndrum to get to Corrour Halt and from there either walk over the
    > hills around Ben Alder to Culra Bothy (not done that but know a man who has) or walk north past
    > the head of Loch Treig to the Larig Leacach bothy then up over the Grey Corries ridge - done that
    > but it wasn't in March. It was wild and snowy on the ridge though, in May.
    >
    > Picture from that trip on
    >
    > http://community.webshots.com/scripts/editPhotos.fcgi?action=showMyPhoto&albumID=77849124&photoID-
    > =118834068&security=hrTNYB
    >
    > Larig Leacach itself is not that inaccessible, but the country to the west of it is pretty wild. I
    > believe there's another bothy en route through to Glen Nevis from Loch Treig ...... Meanach IIRC
    > which would be at GR 266685 on the Ben Nevis OS 1:50K.
    >
    > We walked from Larig Leacach up to the bealach between Stob Ban and Stob Coire Claurigh, camped
    > there and climbed Stob Ban in the evening, then walked over the Grey Corries ridge next day, minus
    > Sgurr Coinnich Beag. The memorable bit of the day was the descent along the course of the Allt
    > Coire an Eoin which becomes a mighty river draining Aonach Beag and a good bit of the Grey
    > corries. It's superbly scenic, and as wild and remote as you could wish, with a spectacular
    > waterfall at GR 224757 that would have tea rooms and coach parks if it were near a road. After
    > that, it's forest tracks and the river is much reduced by a dam. You can get the train back to
    > Tyndrum from Spean Bridge.
    >
    >
    > Course there's always majestic Knoydart - but that's a bit busy these days maybe?
    >
    > Paul Leigh Lancs
     
  17. AndyP

    AndyP Guest

    "david c." <[email protected]>

    > I wouldn't want to be a party pooper - but isn't the weather a bit rough to go walking in the
    > Cairngorms in March???

    Dunno, it's not March yet. I didn't need crampons, ice axe, map or compass for several days up on
    the plateau last week. It was also pretty much completely windless and very sunny. But I gather the
    previous week had winds up to 120mph. Who can say anything about the weather? The 2 reasons I picked
    the Cairngorms for our first winter trip to the Highlands by the way despite it's reputation for
    strong winds were firstly easy access to none too steep slopes and secondly easy low level walks if
    the weather did turn out to be very bad eg. up to Loch Einich or Ryovan Pass.
     
Loading...
Loading...