Fixed gear bikes



S

spider

Guest
You can order a fixed gear from roadandtrackbikes.com they have new and
used frames. Bianchi, Felt, De Bernardi, custom frames and they can
build it up for you with the components you want. Fixed is definitely a
lot of fun when you get it down. Becareful though, because once you go
fixed you never go back. Now my road bike sits collecting dust.
 
Q

Qui si parla Campagnolo

Guest
spider wrote:
> You can order a fixed gear from roadandtrackbikes.com they have new and
> used frames. Bianchi, Felt, De Bernardi, custom frames and they can
> build it up for you with the components you want. Fixed is definitely a
> lot of fun when you get it down. Becareful though, because once you go
> fixed you never go back. Now my road bike sits collecting dust.


Or go to just about any bike shop that is worth it's snuff and they can
do the same thing. Fixies are not new, not mystical, easier to create
than any geared bicycle.

Fixies are a great alternative when the weather gets cold, mucky but it
will never replace a geared bicycle, particularly anywhere the road
does anything but stay flat.

http://www.fixedgeargallery.com/2005/feb/chisholm.htm
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
Qui si parla Campagnolo <[email protected]> wrote:

> spider wrote:
>> You can order a fixed gear from roadandtrackbikes.com they have new
>> and used frames. Bianchi, Felt, De Bernardi, custom frames and they
>> can build it up for you with the components you want. Fixed is
>> definitely a lot of fun when you get it down. Becareful though,
>> because once you go fixed you never go back. Now my road bike sits
>> collecting dust.

>
> Or go to just about any bike shop that is worth it's snuff and they
> can do the same thing. Fixies are not new, not mystical, easier to
> create than any geared bicycle.
>
> Fixies are a great alternative when the weather gets cold, mucky but
> it will never replace a geared bicycle, particularly anywhere the road
> does anything but stay flat.
>
> http://www.fixedgeargallery.com/2005/feb/chisholm.htm


Wot 'e said. I'm commuting on mine ATM, but as soon as the Speedmachine's
new rear shock appears, it's back to disraeli gears for me...

--
Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
Do not top-post like a Cretinous Foul-Yob fit only for Stoning.
 
Q

Qui si parla Campagnolo

Guest
spider wrote:
> You can order a fixed gear from roadandtrackbikes.com they have new and
> used frames. Bianchi, Felt, De Bernardi, custom frames and they can
> build it up for you with the components you want. Fixed is definitely a
> lot of fun when you get it down. Becareful though, because once you go
> fixed you never go back. Now my road bike sits collecting dust.


Interesting site

Title page, it's 'you are' or 'you're', not 'your' for riding.

Not much on the web site about track or fixie stuff. One track frame,
and the 'custom' road frame has vertical dropouts, not horizontal.

No track/fixie cranks, wheels, tires, cogs, chains, hubs, brakes,
fenders, etc..Some research would be nice if you are going to link to
this web site.

If you need track/fixie info-call or email me.
 
T

Tim McNamara

Guest
"Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> writes:

> spider wrote:
>> You can order a fixed gear from roadandtrackbikes.com they have new
>> and used frames. Bianchi, Felt, De Bernardi, custom frames and they
>> can build it up for you with the components you want. Fixed is
>> definitely a lot of fun when you get it down. Becareful though,
>> because once you go fixed you never go back. Now my road bike sits
>> collecting dust.

>
> Interesting site
>
> Title page, it's 'you are' or 'you're', not 'your' for riding.
>
> Not much on the web site about track or fixie stuff. One track
> frame, and the 'custom' road frame has vertical dropouts, not
> horizontal.
>
> No track/fixie cranks, wheels, tires, cogs, chains, hubs, brakes,
> fenders, etc..Some research would be nice if you are going to link
> to this web site.


Since he (or she) has been shilling the site in various bike
newsgroups, I'm guessing it might be his (or hers).
 
Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
> Fixies are a great alternative when the weather gets cold, mucky but it
> will never replace a geared bicycle, particularly anywhere the road
> does anything but stay flat.
>

I beg to differ. I regularly take my fixed gear for training
centuries. My two regular loops involve 7800 and 10500 feet of climb.
Plus, the street I live on is VERY steep, about 20% for a couple
hundred feet.

Fixies can be a lot of fun in the hills. Just gear them right.

Tom
 
M

Mark Hickey

Guest
"[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:

>Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
>> Fixies are a great alternative when the weather gets cold, mucky but it
>> will never replace a geared bicycle, particularly anywhere the road
>> does anything but stay flat.
>>

>I beg to differ. I regularly take my fixed gear for training
>centuries. My two regular loops involve 7800 and 10500 feet of climb.
>Plus, the street I live on is VERY steep, about 20% for a couple
>hundred feet.
>
>Fixies can be a lot of fun in the hills. Just gear them right.


I love fixies....

http://www.habcycles.com/fixie.jpg

(that's mine)... but the thought of doing a century on one geared for
a 20% hill makes me shudder.

Yep, that's a 53-16 on mine.

Mark "climb sitting down? I don't think so..." Hickey
Habanero Cycles
http://www.habcycles.com
Home of the $795 ti frame
 
Q

Qui si parla Campagnolo

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
> > Fixies are a great alternative when the weather gets cold, mucky but it
> > will never replace a geared bicycle, particularly anywhere the road
> > does anything but stay flat.
> >

> I beg to differ. I regularly take my fixed gear for training
> centuries. My two regular loops involve 7800 and 10500 feet of climb.
> Plus, the street I live on is VERY steep, about 20% for a couple
> hundred feet.
>
> Fixies can be a lot of fun in the hills. Just gear them right.
>
> Tom


I guess but I ride my fixie for the
-fun of it after riding a geared bike for 8 months, something different
-no gears, to get dirty in the wet/muck
-teaches me once again to ride in circles
-more riding for the time spent

If ya like to grunt up hills on a fixie, fine but I prefer to use it as
a break from this type of spring/summer riding, not another source of
pain.

If it is geared to to be able to get up a 20% incline, how can you ride
it on the flat?..must have very fast feet or amazing ability to climb a
20% grade in a 42/16(what I use).
 
Q

Qui si parla Campagnolo

Guest
Mark Hickey wrote:
> "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
> >> Fixies are a great alternative when the weather gets cold, mucky but it
> >> will never replace a geared bicycle, particularly anywhere the road
> >> does anything but stay flat.
> >>

> >I beg to differ. I regularly take my fixed gear for training
> >centuries. My two regular loops involve 7800 and 10500 feet of climb.
> >Plus, the street I live on is VERY steep, about 20% for a couple
> >hundred feet.
> >
> >Fixies can be a lot of fun in the hills. Just gear them right.

>
> I love fixies....
>
> http://www.habcycles.com/fixie.jpg
>
> (that's mine)... but the thought of doing a century on one geared for
> a 20% hill makes me shudder.
>
> Yep, that's a 53-16 on mine.
>
> Mark "climb sitting down? I don't think so..." Hickey



Pretty-here is mine

http://www.fixedgeargallery.com/2005/feb/chisholm.htm

53/16...yowser!!!
 
D

David L. Johnson

Guest
On Wed, 30 Nov 2005 20:46:09 -0700, Mark Hickey wrote:

> http://www.habcycles.com/fixie.jpg


So, Mark, do you sell fixed-gear frames with track ends now?
>
> (that's mine)... but the thought of doing a century on one geared for
> a 20% hill makes me shudder.


Now, now, we all know it takes the same amount of work to climb a hill,
not matter what the gear. My knees might disagree, though.
>
> Yep, that's a 53-16 on mine.


Grrr. Mine currently has a 48/18.

--

David L. Johnson

__o | "It doesn't get any easier, you just go faster." --Greg LeMond
_`\(,_ |
(_)/ (_) |
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, David L. Johnson
([email protected]) wrote:
> On Wed, 30 Nov 2005 20:46:09 -0700, Mark Hickey wrote:
>
> > http://www.habcycles.com/fixie.jpg

>
> So, Mark, do you sell fixed-gear frames with track ends now?
> >
> > (that's mine)... but the thought of doing a century on one geared for
> > a 20% hill makes me shudder.

>
> Now, now, we all know it takes the same amount of work to climb a hill,
> not matter what the gear. My knees might disagree, though.
> >
> > Yep, that's a 53-16 on mine.

>
> Grrr. Mine currently has a 48/18.


Big gear cruncher alert! Get 'im, lads!

--
Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
44-18
 
Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
(Mark Hickey wrote):
> > I love fixies....
> >
> > http://www.habcycles.com/fixie.jpg


(QspC replied):
> Pretty-here is mine
>
> http://www.fixedgeargallery.com/2005/feb/chisholm.htm


Snowing in Boulder... brrrr. No flap on that front fender, Mr. C?
(asked he who once rode a New Year's Day century on packed snow,
warmest reported local temp., 19deg F) (42/17, w/flap or I probably
wouldn't have made it).

How did you fixe-luxe (tnx for pics, compliments) riders deal with
chainline?

This is my (RIP, Johnny Cash) '59/'60/'74 Fixelac, 44/15, 1/8"; a Hans
Schneider OS steel track frame, ebay "Cinelli" road fork that darn near
matches for red:

http://homepage.mac.com/dustoyevsky/PhotoAlbum1.html

Chainline, "the natural way" (track hub, cog, crank) <g>. It was not
always so, but I got away with it (murder, in retrospect). "Never
again".

There's a (t)rusty old Holdsworth touring frame in the pile, awaiting
parts (today, Mr. Postman?), incl. a better fender bracket or two, plus
a drop bolt to add Campy NR f. brake, delete ancient Universal 61 with
ancient straddle wire. Old build up, fooling around with handlebars:

http://homepage.mac.com/dustoyevsky/PhotoAlbum5.html

Re- (un-) dished old CRec road hub, with track adapter (HED?), road
pitch cog on backwards. Gonna put a rear rack on, too. --D-y
 
B

Booker C. Bense

Guest
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In article <[email protected]>,
David L. Johnson <[email protected]> wrote:
>On Wed, 30 Nov 2005 20:46:09 -0700, Mark Hickey wrote:
>
>> http://www.habcycles.com/fixie.jpg

>
>So, Mark, do you sell fixed-gear frames with track ends now?
>>
>> (that's mine)... but the thought of doing a century on one geared for
>> a 20% hill makes me shudder.

>
>Now, now, we all know it takes the same amount of work to climb a hill,
>not matter what the gear. My knees might disagree, though.
>>

>


_ IMHO, it's not the up that's hard on fixed gear, it's the
down. I can imagine climbing 5k or so in a fixed gear century,
I just can't get my head around the descending that would be
involved. I did one this fall with 3K of climbing and the long
descents were much more grueling that the ascents. I'm not saying
the climbing was easy, but you just stop and walk for a bit until
things are back in control... But the long descents are torture even
with brakes.

_ Booker C. Bense


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Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
> [email protected] wrote:
> > Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
> > > Fixies are a great alternative when the weather gets cold, mucky but it
> > > will never replace a geared bicycle, particularly anywhere the road
> > > does anything but stay flat.
> > >

> > I beg to differ. I regularly take my fixed gear for training
> > centuries. My two regular loops involve 7800 and 10500 feet of climb.
> > Plus, the street I live on is VERY steep, about 20% for a couple
> > hundred feet.
> >
> > Fixies can be a lot of fun in the hills. Just gear them right.
> >
> > Tom

>
> I guess but I ride my fixie for the
> -fun of it after riding a geared bike for 8 months, something different
> -no gears, to get dirty in the wet/muck
> -teaches me once again to ride in circles
> -more riding for the time spent
>
> If ya like to grunt up hills on a fixie, fine but I prefer to use it as
> a break from this type of spring/summer riding, not another source of
> pain.
>
> If it is geared to to be able to get up a 20% incline, how can you ride
> it on the flat?..must have very fast feet or amazing ability to climb a
> 20% grade in a 42/16(what I use).


You make it sound like I don't enjoy riding my fixed gear in the hills.
I do.

The gearing is 42/22 (I occasionally get flamed on this group for
mentioning that). I can just barely make it up the hill that I live on
with that gearing.

I use it for commuting in the winter and spring (I live in San Diego
and that is the only time we have bad weather) and usually do long
training rides after that. My commute is 25 miles each way. It only
takes an extra 10 minutes on the fixed gear with that low gearing.

BTW, here is a picture of my fixie (taken right after I got my digital
camera). As you can see it is nothing special:
http://www.fixedgeargallery.com/2004/f/reynolds.htm

Tom
 
M

m-gineering

Guest
"Booker C. Bense" wrote:

> _ IMHO, it's not the up that's hard on fixed gear, it's the
> down. I can imagine climbing 5k or so in a fixed gear century,
> I just can't get my head around the descending that would be
> involved. I did one this fall with 3K of climbing and the long
> descents were much more grueling that the ascents. I'm not saying
> the climbing was easy, but you just stop and walk for a bit until
> things are back in control... But the long descents are torture even
> with brakes.


classic solution is to braze a small step each side of the fork to rest
your feet ;)

(and to -try to- slow down at the bottom with a plunger brake)
--
---
Marten Gerritsen

INFOapestaartjeM-GINEERINGpuntNL
www.m-gineering.nl
 
T

Tim McNamara

Guest
"David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> writes:

> On Wed, 30 Nov 2005 20:46:09 -0700, Mark Hickey wrote:
>
>> http://www.habcycles.com/fixie.jpg

>
> So, Mark, do you sell fixed-gear frames with track ends now?
>>
>> (that's mine)... but the thought of doing a century on one geared
>> for a 20% hill makes me shudder.

>
> Now, now, we all know it takes the same amount of work to climb a
> hill, not matter what the gear. My knees might disagree, though.


Work in the sense of physics, yes. Work in the sense of perceived
exertion, no. At least if you're 215 lbs like me.

>> Yep, that's a 53-16 on mine.

>
> Grrr. Mine currently has a 48/18.


Mine's a 50 x 20 (although it's a coaster brake hub, not a fixed. Not
taking chances after this summer's surgery for a meniscus tear).
 
M

Mark Hickey

Guest
"Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote:

>Mark Hickey wrote:


>> I love fixies....
>>
>> http://www.habcycles.com/fixie.jpg
>>
>> (that's mine)... but the thought of doing a century on one geared for
>> a 20% hill makes me shudder.
>>
>> Yep, that's a 53-16 on mine.
>>
>> Mark "climb sitting down? I don't think so..." Hickey


>Pretty-here is mine
>
>http://www.fixedgeargallery.com/2005/feb/chisholm.htm


Very nice. Makes me feel like a girlie man that mine never gets snow
on it... sigh...

>53/16...yowser!!!


I hate running out of gear going down hills or downwind, and like to
climb out of the saddle (obviously, huh?). ;-)

Mark Hickey
Habanero Cycles
http://www.habcycles.com
Home of the $795 ti frame
 
Q

Qui si parla Campagnolo

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
> (Mark Hickey wrote):
> > > I love fixies....
> > >
> > > http://www.habcycles.com/fixie.jpg

>
> (QspC replied):
> > Pretty-here is mine
> >
> > http://www.fixedgeargallery.com/2005/feb/chisholm.htm

>
> Snowing in Boulder... brrrr. No flap on that front fender, Mr. C?
> (asked he who once rode a New Year's Day century on packed snow,
> warmest reported local temp., 19deg F) (42/17, w/flap or I probably
> wouldn't have made it).
>
> How did you fixe-luxe (tnx for pics, compliments) riders deal with
> chainline?


Phil track hub spaced to 130,mm, crank with the ring on the inside,
track CR bolts, Phil BB but even w/o it, perfect chainline with a
Campag BB.

>
> This is my (RIP, Johnny Cash) '59/'60/'74 Fixelac, 44/15, 1/8"; a Hans
> Schneider OS steel track frame, ebay "Cinelli" road fork that darn near
> matches for red:
>
> http://homepage.mac.com/dustoyevsky/PhotoAlbum1.html
>
> Chainline, "the natural way" (track hub, cog, crank) <g>. It was not
> always so, but I got away with it (murder, in retrospect). "Never
> again".
>
> There's a (t)rusty old Holdsworth touring frame in the pile, awaiting
> parts (today, Mr. Postman?), incl. a better fender bracket or two, plus
> a drop bolt to add Campy NR f. brake, delete ancient Universal 61 with
> ancient straddle wire. Old build up, fooling around with handlebars:
>
> http://homepage.mac.com/dustoyevsky/PhotoAlbum5.html
>
> Re- (un-) dished old CRec road hub, with track adapter (HED?), road
> pitch cog on backwards. Gonna put a rear rack on, too. --D-y
 
Q

Qui si parla Campagnolo

Guest
[email protected] wrote:

>
> You make it sound like I don't enjoy riding my fixed gear in the hills.
> I do.
>
> The gearing is 42/22 (I occasionally get flamed on this group for
> mentioning that). I can just barely make it up the hill that I live on
> with that gearing.


Like I said, ya must have pretty fast feet with that gearing. A 42/16
and I can spin at 90 rpm on the flat...but gearing is the very
definition of 'personal'.
>
> I use it for commuting in the winter and spring (I live in San Diego
> and that is the only time we have bad weather) and usually do long
> training rides after that. My commute is 25 miles each way. It only
> takes an extra 10 minutes on the fixed gear with that low gearing.
>
> BTW, here is a picture of my fixie (taken right after I got my digital
> camera). As you can see it is nothing special:
> http://www.fixedgeargallery.com/2004/f/reynolds.htm
>
> Tom
 
Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
(inre chainline, his Moots)

> Phil track hub spaced to 130,mm, crank with the ring on the inside,
> track CR bolts, Phil BB but even w/o it, perfect chainline with a
> Campag BB.


Thanks for the info, appreciated. --D-y
 

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