Fixed gear distance bike... Anyone advice me on my ideas?



Destroyer OS.

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Jul 28, 2006
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I am considering having a custom frame built for me, fixed gear...

Frame wise... Considering it will be unlikely I will be drafting with anyone I have been considering triathalon geometry. The reasons are for comfort and low drag (aerodynamics). Any thoughts as to the bottom bracket location? I can not really figure out if this would give any bennifit. What fork ends work well with some good chain tensioners? (this is a huge reason I want another frame too)

Reasons why a road geometry really means little to me... They are ment to be fast handling for corners, uh this is going to be fixed gear.

I guess my question is about going up a hill with Aero bars, anyone comment?

Components... I have discovered old but good stuff is not cutting it.

My thoughts...

FSA TI bottom bracket (68x108) with FSA track 49 1/8 chain crankset. Pedal wise I might go with a LOOK style for long rides but swap on my mountain for around town.

Brakes? I know I want front and back for extremely steep large hills. I have been using Nashbar house brand on my roadbike and they seem pretty decent. Brake lever wise I will use what ever is avaible for Aero bars, or if I end up on road bars some Campy ones (have on road bike, love them). Here is the big trick, I want fenders. Do I go with side pull long reach Nashbars? Centerpull? Would Oval Aero brakes allow for some? I have to ride in winter too (35mm studded tires and fenders). Would that be too much to ask?

Handlebars, what Aero bars are good? This is all about comfort from what I can tell. The only concern about them I have is overtime, would they force me into being bent over to the point my neck hurt after riding awhile, anymore than hoods on a roadbike?

I plan to use a Brook seat, probably my professional.

What headsets are good? (threadless)

Fork? (not custom) Needs to have a brake hole, and room for fenders and studded tires would be nice... I know I can run Skinny fenders but then I sacrafice studded tires. This is quiet a delima.... I suppose I could go to Canti-lever brakes?!?!? I hate to do that in many ways though, I hate the bosses.

All comments, questions, whatever, please inquire.

If all else fails I might just have to have two bikes... and not ride this one in winter.
 

EoinC

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Feb 9, 2004
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Destroyer OS. said:
I am considering having a custom frame built for me, fixed gear....
I ride an old fixie track bike on the road. I rode it for a feww years without brakes before my wife threatened me with divorce if I didn't fit a brake (still not sure that I made the right choice - I crashed the first day I had the brake fitted).
If you are going to be riding some distance, head away from the tighter, harsherframe geometries. I, personally, can't see the point in having aero bars unless you are planning on competing in time trials on it.
One thing to watch for, as most fixie riders will be aware of, is BB height. Too low and it will restrict how far you can lean into a corner with a given crank length before you get that adrenalin injection that comes with pedal-tarmac contact. I have pissy little 165's on my bike, which have me hitting the deck before the pedals touch down, but would definitely prefer to be riding something longer.
Get used to the fact that it is just as hard work on a fixie riding downhill as it is uphill. I usually sit up on any lengthy downhill and control my speed with air drag (I knew there was a reason for that bulky midriff) and slowing the spin. Just because the brakes are there, doesn't mean I have to use them.
 

Destroyer OS.

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Jul 28, 2006
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The point of the Aero bars is I can be aerodynamic without drafting, which I will never get to do. Also the comfort level is really high from what I understand.

I want the geometry to be comfort. I will be having a fit for this bike. Supposidly Triathalon with Aero bars is the best in comfort, just not cornering and drafting. I need to try a bike locally with them on it if I can.

http://www.bikesportmichigan.com/bikes/difference.shtml

That is where I got some helpful information from.

What I really want to know is the effect of Aero bars and uphill...
 

EoinC

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Feb 9, 2004
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Destroyer OS. said:
...What I really want to know is the effect of Aero bars and uphill...
Can't help you there (never having ridden them), other than to say that I used to be able to beat another rider (w/aero bars and a squillion gears) going up Genting Highlands in Malaysia on my pissy old fixie, although he could definitely drop me on the flats.
They look exceedingly ungainly when out of the saddle and, if you're riding a fixie geared to maintain any degree of speed on the flats, and have some steep hills to conquer, you will be spending time out of the saddle.
 

Destroyer OS.

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Jul 28, 2006
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In the saddle on a hill... probably not huh :cool:

I burn people on the slight hill I live on, on my fixie... I have no idea if I would burn them on my road bike because I have only gone up it lately a few times... There has been no one, and my legs are dead from Crew, Mat Pilates, and Yoga haha...
 

John M

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Jun 21, 2005
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Destroyer OS. said:
The point of the

bars is I can be aerodynamic without drafting, which I will never get to do. Also the comfort level is really high from what I understand.

I want the geometry to be comfort. I will be having a fit for this bike. Supposidly Triathalon with Aero bars is the best in comfort, just not cornering and drafting. I need to try a bike locally with them on it if I can.

http://www.bikesportmichigan.com/bikes/difference.shtml

That is where I got some helpful information from.

What I really want to know is the effect of Aero bars and uphill...

I think that what you are proposing is a bad idea unless you live someplace really flat. Aero bikes are designed to be ridden in the aero position ALL of the time. Their handling is not that good, and they are not comfortable to ride out of the aero bar position.

That article by Tom Demerly applies to bike design for bikes intended to be RACED in the aero position and for training to RACE in that position. The aero position is generally not any more comfortable than a properly fitted road bike. Before you custom order such a thing, I would strongly advise test riding some stock bikes built with the TT/Tri geometry to see if that is what you really want. For what you propose, I would suggest that you get a standard road geometry and use some "shorty" clip-on aero bars designed for use with road bikes (such as those made by Profile, Oval, or Vision).

Take at look at this article on the Slowtwitch website about climbing on an aero/tri geometry bike:

http://www.slowtwitch.com/cgi-bin/p...headings/techctr/ascending.html&text=climbing
 

Destroyer OS.

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Jul 28, 2006
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That article makes me lean toward them even more. The positioning of the bottom bracket sounds particularly appealying for this... Several people have mentioned how much they like it, and how it may even be better than road bike geometry at this part of the bike, they can not get enough of straight up and down.

Out of the Aero bar positition and into the decending on the brake lever ends seems valid for downhill and uphill... That hand position is basically like a mountain bike position with bar ends...

Lower wind resistance would equal lower amount of energy expenditure, which is a huge factor in fixed gear... I have to try one but I honestly think I might up liking it a lot.
 

Destroyer OS.

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Jul 28, 2006
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Well I got to try out a TT bike today. I was just on the trainer but still.

I found Aero bars to be awsome... The bottom bracket however was not very comfortable unless I was out of Aero bar position.

Now that I understand the difference I can some what re-create it to an effect when riding around. I scooted forward on my seat a lot just to mess around and found that it is not very appealing on a fixed gear. The fact was it just hurt to try and accelerate. Once accelerated everything is A-ok, but you have to get to full speed out of the saddle.

Now I am thinking road or track geometry, what is the difference... Would Track work on the hoods?
 

bobbyOCR

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Aug 31, 2005
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Destroyer OS. said:
Well I got to try out a TT bike today. I was just on the trainer but still.

I found Aero bars to be awsome... The bottom bracket however was not very comfortable unless I was out of Aero bar position.

Now that I understand the difference I can some what re-create it to an effect when riding around. I scooted forward on my seat a lot just to mess around and found that it is not very appealing on a fixed gear. The fact was it just hurt to try and accelerate. Once accelerated everything is A-ok, but you have to get to full speed out of the saddle.

Now I am thinking road or track geometry, what is the difference... Would Track work on the hoods?
Try aero-bars for a ride over two hours. Your natural head position has you looking down at your front wheel. While riding you can't do that so you look up. Unless you have a flexible thoracic spine, this can lead to breathing difficulties, neck cramping and serious shoulder/neck pain on a longer ride. Be very careful. I suggest getting a road geometry then you can put the seat forward and use shorty bars as suggested.