fixed gear training

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by kopride, Jun 2, 2010.

  1. kopride

    kopride Member

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    Does anybody integrate some fixed gear training into their program? During the summer, I spend some time down the Jersey shore and it is all flat, and the salt air seems tough on the old bikes that I keep down there to ride. Since, I generally stay in one gear anyway during most of my training rides down there, I figured I go all the way and just buy a cheap fix gear/ss. I'm trying to stay minimalist so I figure a few days a week off my PT equipped techno wonder might be good for the proverbial soul--I'm not even going to put on a cyclocomputer. But I am interested in whether some of the more scientifically inclined folks on this forum work in some fixed gear training from time to time for yucks and grins. Seems like the discipline of never coasting might help with spinning in circles and trying to produce power at various cadences. During the winter, I was thinking of using it as a bike I keep at work for quick lunchtime rides.

    Thoughts? Jibes? Insults? Insight? Tips? all welcome. :confused:

    PS. I'm still doing most of my training with my PT in the sweet spot during the week. This is basically weekend fun, but I would like to make any time I spend on the bike somewhat meaningful. I am hoping that it will be more than just a middle age man making a fashion statement, and showing off to the bikini clad youngsters (who have no real interest in a 44 year old man wearing spandex on or off my fixed gear). :eek:
     
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  2. EoinC

    EoinC New Member

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    Our Junior squad incorporate fixed as part of their road programme. They also ride track throughout the year, both for competition and as part of the road season training.
    As Juniors, they are riding restricted gears antway, and have developed high cadence riding styles.
    I ride fixed because I like it - simplicity can be a beautiful thing (and no coasting). Try it - uou'll like it.

    Cheers,
    Eoin
     
  3. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    Ditch the fixie obsession.

    The next thing you'll know you will be no longer checking out the young ladies on the beach front, instead talking to dudes about how rad your new ride is before heading back to his place for...

    Fixed gear bikes belong on the track and maybe, on short hillclimbs with a pretty constant gradient.
     
  4. kopride

    kopride Member

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    Thanks for this. I was in the tatoo parlor with my my new friend Bruce, all ready to have my eyebrow pierced and a Chinese character tattooed on my neck when your message came. I immediately threw down the cigar I was breaking up to roll a blunt, threw my fixie in the dumpster, and unrolled my pant leg. When I got home, I threw on my replica Cervello kit and hit the road on a replica tour racer while I monitored my progress on my power meter. After I got back, I had completely conventional normal hetero relations with my wife. (Of course, I downloaded the data into training peaks beforehand).

    Why does the term irony keep popping into my head when I think of the incongruity of guys in "paint on" spandex questioning the sexual preferences of others? I mean, other than throwing on a pink boa and singing broadway show tunes, how much more gay can the sport of cycling be? We certainly aren't riding for the attention of all those lovely ladies who are avid cycling fans.

    But again, thanks for the save. I was heading in that direction before I got your message.
     
  5. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    Personally, I don't see the attraction of riding a fixed gear around on flat roads.

    I've had friends that believed it did them good only to get their as$es handed to them in early season road races where it's windy and you have to slog at it in a biggish gear. They've also noted that they got lazy and found it harder to pedal on a bike with a freewheel after an extended time on a fixed.

    Tight lycra is one thing... riding around in tight jeans that were once the rage back in the 80's, well, that's another entirely. :p
     
  6. smaryka

    smaryka Member

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    I don't see anything wrong with riding a fixie if you like it and most of your serious training is encompassed elsewhere on other rides/bikes. Unless you're a track cyclist, in which case a fixie would be more specific training.

    I have one and ride it primarily around the city because I hate having to brake and freewheel constantly in stop-and-go traffic. I also like its simplicity and ease of use.

    As far as training goes, I think a fixie might be useful for standing sprint-type work. Also nice to get your legs spinning and comfortable at a high cadence (in a tailwind or slight downhill). I find that standing to climb on a fixie results in a smoother pedal stroke as the movement of the rear wheel helping the crank to turn seems to eliminate that dead spot. Not sure if this really transfers over to the road bike but I'm sure it doesn't hurt either.

    Bottom line, if you like riding it, just ride it. Ignore the idiots who equate fixie with hipster. Who cares who rides what, when, where and how? Just ride.
     
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