fixed



Ira in Chi

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Apr 5, 2004
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I like riding fixed in the winter because it gives me more awareness and control over what my rear wheel is doing in slippery conditions.

I like to run brakes because i've found that constantly backpedalling hurts my knees. I can stop equally as fast either way though.

It may only be psychological, but i think the fluid behavior of fixed gear bikes is more natural in traffic than the start-stop pacing of a freewheel.
 

holokaibrown

New Member
Mar 27, 2004
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So we all know that bikes can think for themselves.

I got a fixed about 5 months ago and since then I'm sure that my three other bikes have been plotting to kill it. I've become addicted and can't ride anything else. It rules. In fact I love it so much that I'm buying a bianchi pista in a few weeks.
 

EoinC

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Feb 9, 2004
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Originally posted by holokaibrown
I've become addicted and can't ride anything else.
I picked up my track bike when I was living near a Velodrome in Perth and wanted to start back track racing whenever I was home. I subsequently moved further away and the Fixie ended up spending all its time on the road, with the Roadies hangin' up in the shed. I love riding it on the road.It chases those cars and buses like nothing else (until I spin out) and behaves extremly well in decidedly dodgey circumstances. When I moved up to Malaysia, it was the Fixie that came with me.

Eoin C
 

Coilean

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Apr 8, 2004
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I too ride a fixed on the road. Snow, slush, sleet, rain, and whatever else comes my way. And if we're keeping track o' numbers, I do about 300 miles on your average week (pure city riding).

As for a brake, well, it's there. It doesn't work, but it's there.
 

gboff

New Member
Apr 23, 2004
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Love ridin the track bike on the road... until i hit a hill! Big gear and no brakes dont work down hills!
 

teammiyata

New Member
Apr 15, 2005
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All my bikes are fixed. The riding I do ranges from inner-city traffic chaos to long distance endurance-athons (200+ miles). I have 2 pistas and 2 converted MTB frames with 700c wheels. The MTB frames are so cool. They have a naturally high bb, are very stiff(lugged steel all the way) and when you strip them down are really light. Only drawback is the long wheelbase most MTB's have.
People ask me about the no-manual brake thing from time to time and I guess the best piece of advice would be to use big rear cogs and always use the high-carbon chains.
The bigger the cog is--the easier it is to slow down. You are actually grabbing more suface area of the cog creating less friction and saving your legs/life. You also get to run real big front rings making you look way strong... unless somebody shows up with a calculator.
Professional or keirin track chains are strong. You could tow a Buick with one. Maintain your chain. Don't be afraid to buy a new one every 3-4 thousand miles.
If you can't lock up the rear wheel-YOU MUST HAVE A MANUAL BRAKE.
Back pedalling muscles are the hallmark of the fixed-gear rider and are the root of most problems for beginners. You have to develop and condition a whole new set of muscles that your "gearey" bike has completely ignored. If you have to back pedal real hard and you don't have the muscle to back it up other parts of the knee are going to absorb the shock...and that ain't good
 

mr.goggles

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Jun 20, 2005
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I have been looking to get a fixie for a while and will definately be running at least 1 brake. Do you guys have any reccomendations for what size chainring/cog i should go with for mild hills/commuting on the street?


By the way whoever mentioned love n' haight - you made me salivate with an incredible craving for peppered veggie steak.... oh god
 

teammiyata

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Apr 15, 2005
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Some fixed riders like big ratios, but to me that kinda defeats the purpose of riding fixed. For myself I would run about a 65 inch gear for commuting and hills. You might need something smaller to start with perhaps 62 inch. I usually run a flip flop hub with 18t on one side and 19t on another. Throughout the year I'll go from a 45 front ring to a 50 or 51. A good starting gear would be something like 46x18. From there, just do what your legs tell you. Take it slow at first so as to build those backpedaling muscles. Cheers.
mr.goggles said:
I have been looking to get a fixie for a while and will definately be running at least 1 brake. Do you guys have any reccomendations for what size chainring/cog i should go with for mild hills/commuting on the street?


By the way whoever mentioned love n' haight - you made me salivate with an incredible craving for peppered veggie steak.... oh god
 

EoinC

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Feb 9, 2004
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teammiyata said:
Some fixed riders like big ratios, but to me that kinda defeats the purpose of riding fixed. For myself I would run about a 65 inch gear for commuting and hills. You might need something smaller to start with perhaps 62 inch. I usually run a flip flop hub with 18t on one side and 19t on another. Throughout the year I'll go from a 45 front ring to a 50 or 51. A good starting gear would be something like 46x18. From there, just do what your legs tell you. Take it slow at first so as to build those backpedaling muscles. Cheers.
What crank lengths are the rest of you using? I'm on 165's om my Fixie. I don't mind it and I never touch down unless the corner is reverse camber, but it certainly hits on the hills.
 

teammiyata

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Apr 15, 2005
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On my pistas I like 165's. They'yre spinnier. I have 170's on my conversions but they're ATB's with alot of clearance. To be totally honest I've ridden converted road bikes with 170's and never had a problem in corners. Just lean your bike over until the pedal hits the ground and ask yourself, am I going to corner this drastically? Maybe you will. If so, shorter is better.
EoinC said:
What crank lengths are the rest of you using? I'm on 165's om my Fixie. I don't mind it and I never touch down unless the corner is reverse camber, but it certainly hits on the hills.
 

EoinC

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Feb 9, 2004
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EoinC said:
...but it certainly hits on the hills.
After re-reading this, I should clarify - I meant that it "hits" my leg strength in climbing hills.
 

EoinC

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Feb 9, 2004
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teammiyata said:
What do you mean by "hits"?
Diminishes, depletes, decimates, destroys & generally makes my climbing pathetic. The 165's feel like they have no leverage on the hills. They are liveable (since I don't want to throw any more money at the bike), but not ideal. 172.5's or 175's would be much better for me.
 

teammiyata

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Apr 15, 2005
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I know a couple of guys that run 175's but they're like 6'5" or taller. You really want to be careful using long cranks on a fix. It's not the downstroke that gives you problem, it's the crank coming back at you. If the crank is too long it will constantly "slap" your leg and can cause leg and knee problems. I'd go for the 172.5's unless you are real tall or have long legs. Remember, your trying to spin up the hill. On a fix this skill can take a while to develop.
EoinC said:
Diminishes, depletes, decimates, destroys & generally makes my climbing pathetic. The 165's feel like they have no leverage on the hills. They are liveable (since I don't want to throw any more money at the bike), but not ideal. 172.5's or 175's would be much better for me.
 

EoinC

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Feb 9, 2004
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teammiyata said:
...I'd go for the 172.5's unless you are real tall or have long legs. Remember, your trying to spin up the hill. On a fix this skill can take a while to develop.
I'm not actually intending changing - I've been riding this fixie on the road for the last 6 years or so with 165's. I have no problem with spinning and keeping up with traffic, but the 165's are a bit short for leverage going over the hills around here. Liveable, but not perfect.
 

teammiyata

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Apr 15, 2005
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I don't think the fix was really intended for climbing. The few times I've taken mine into 'real' hills, climbing has always been tough. 165's definitely don't help. On the other hand, I think they are a much more aclimated to riding in traffic. They just have a predictability that matches the movement of cars. So long as you don't get hit.;)
EoinC said:
I'm not actually intending changing - I've been riding this fixie on the road for the last 6 years or so with 165's. I have no problem with spinning and keeping up with traffic, but the 165's are a bit short for leverage going over the hills around here. Liveable, but not perfect.
 

EoinC

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Feb 9, 2004
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teammiyata said:
I don't think the fix was really intended for climbing. The few times I've taken mine into 'real' hills, climbing has always been tough. 165's definitely don't help. On the other hand, I think they are a much more aclimated to riding in traffic. They just have a predictability that matches the movement of cars. So long as you don't get hit.;)
Agreed. I find the fixie great in traffic - better control than a freewheel and you tend to ride in a more "aware" state. I've gone up some big hills (Genting in Kuala Lumpur) and they're a total grind using a 77" on 165's. They're also fairly tiring coming back down, although I tend to ride sitting up / no hands on the long descents, using the pedalling and wind resistance to control speed - you just don't get the rest that everyone else does.
 

dumbell

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Jun 2, 2004
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About 20 years ago I had a road/track frame built by Cliff Shrubb a brilliant frame builder here in the UK. It duplicated my track bike measurments but made a small allowence to take the shallowest brakes then available (as I had crashed many times out training on the roads due to motorists who just dont seem to see cyclists) and I did not want to risk a bike with no brakes.
I lent the bike to a friends son in South Africa who had shown an interest in track racing.I recently got the bike back after 18 years!! It is a bit scruffey but no major damage. So I bought a pair of Shimano Dura Ace double sided fixed L/Flange track hubs, and had a pair of wheels made up. So I have a nice easy spinning gear one side 66.8 and a good sprint training gear on the other 88. You need to use a half link in the chain and the whole length of the track ends but it can be done. It is great to ride it again.
 

EoinC

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Feb 9, 2004
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dumbell said:
...but made a small allowence to take the shallowest brakes then available...
Modolo's? It's great riding a fixed-wheel on the road (except for the hills).
 

dumbell

New Member
Jun 2, 2004
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You know I was not sure which brakes they were ,so I have just gone and checked and they are Universal CX's. The frame is a mixture of various Columbus tubing mostly track tubing set with tandam chainstays for extra rigidity. Plus Cinelli cast bottom bracket, fork crown and lug set.