Fixing punctures

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Tim Woodall, Nov 29, 2005.

  1. Tim Woodall

    Tim Woodall Guest

    With three punctures in a week (slow in the rear went flat overnight
    then slow in the front ditto and then tonight a roadside change for the
    rear) I've patched some innertubes for the first time in years. As I was
    changing the tires I decided I might as well and then keep some new
    tubes for the next puncture and put some patched tubes in now.

    But the patches are different from what I remember. My patches are on
    paper with a foil covering them. The foil peels of easily but I can't
    get the backing paper off. The first one I tried to get it off after
    sticking the patch on the tube, gave up, but it was too late and I had
    to pull the patch off the tube and start again.

    So I've left the paper on.

    What do others do?

    Tim.


    --
    God said, "div D = rho, div B = 0, curl E = - @B/@t, curl H = J + @D/@t,"
    and there was light.

    http://tjw.hn.org/ http://www.locofungus.btinternet.co.uk/
     
    Tags:


  2. Sandy Morton

    Sandy Morton Guest

  3. Tim Hall

    Tim Hall Guest

    On Wed, 30 Nov 2005 00:09:51 +0000 (GMT), Sandy Morton
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Tim Woodall <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> So I've left the paper on.

    >
    >> What do others do?

    >
    >Leave the paper/film on - saves time.


    But if you feel you _must_ get the paper off, place finger at 12
    o'clock and thumb at 6 o'clock on the newly applied patch, Squeeze,
    such that the patch folds along the 3 o'clock - 9 o'clock line. This
    will cause the paper to crack, allowing ot to be carefully removed
    working from the middle out.



    Tim
     
  4. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Tim Woodall wrote:
    > But the patches are different from what I remember. My patches are on
    > paper with a foil covering them. The foil peels of easily but I can't
    > get the backing paper off. The first one I tried to get it off after
    > sticking the patch on the tube, gave up, but it was too late and I had
    > to pull the patch off the tube and start again.
    >
    > So I've left the paper on.
    >
    > What do others do?


    It's better to remove the backing when you can because that allows the
    patch to stretch more easily, but no big deal if any of it is stuck as it
    will eventually disintegrate of its own accord.

    I tend to use patches with a cellophane rather than paper backing. This
    is easy to peel off cleanly after snips have been made at the sides.

    ~PB
     
  5. Tim Hall wrote:
    > On Wed, 30 Nov 2005 00:09:51 +0000 (GMT), Sandy Morton
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>In article <[email protected]>,
    >> Tim Woodall <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>So I've left the paper on.

    >>
    >>>What do others do?

    >>
    >>Leave the paper/film on - saves time.

    >
    >
    > But if you feel you _must_ get the paper off, place finger at 12
    > o'clock and thumb at 6 o'clock on the newly applied patch, Squeeze,
    > such that the patch folds along the 3 o'clock - 9 o'clock line. This
    > will cause the paper to crack, allowing ot to be carefully removed
    > working from the middle out.
    >
    >
    >
    > Tim

    agreed - only do then when the patch has been on for about 10 mins or
    more - this caught me out when i tried it after 1 minute and the patch
    slid off!! :-(
     
  6. sothach

    sothach Guest

    Tim Woodall wrote:

    > But the patches are different from what I remember. My patches are on
    > paper with a foil covering them. The foil peels of easily but I can't
    > get the backing paper off.


    The new patches aren't all bad though, at least there is no need to
    carry a blow-torch to vulcanise the repair anymore...
     
  7. davek

    davek Guest

    turkeytickler wrote:
    > agreed - only do then when the patch has been on for about 10 mins or
    > more - this caught me out when i tried it after 1 minute and the patch
    > slid off!! :-(


    10 minutes! I usually leave it overnight before trying to remove the
    backing (unless it's an emergency on-the-road repair, of course, but I
    usually have a spare tube for those occasions).

    d.
     
  8. LSMike

    LSMike Guest

    turkeytickler wrote:
    > agreed - only do then when the patch has been on for about 10 mins or
    > more - this caught me out when i tried it after 1 minute and the patch
    > slid off!! :-(


    That makes me think you put the patch on when the solution was still
    wet!
     
  9. LSMike wrote:
    > turkeytickler wrote:
    >
    >>agreed - only do then when the patch has been on for about 10 mins or
    >>more - this caught me out when i tried it after 1 minute and the patch
    >>slid off!! :-(

    >
    >
    > That makes me think you put the patch on when the solution was still
    > wet!
    >

    yes :-|
     
  10. Tim Hall

    Tim Hall Guest

    On 30 Nov 2005 01:54:31 -0800, "LSMike" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >turkeytickler wrote:
    >> agreed - only do then when the patch has been on for about 10 mins or
    >> more - this caught me out when i tried it after 1 minute and the patch
    >> slid off!! :-(

    >
    >That makes me think you put the patch on when the solution was still
    >wet!


    Or used grease instead of glue...


    Tim
     
  11. Tim Hall

    Tim Hall Guest

    On 30 Nov 2005 00:48:45 -0800, "sothach" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >Tim Woodall wrote:
    >
    >> But the patches are different from what I remember. My patches are on
    >> paper with a foil covering them. The foil peels of easily but I can't
    >> get the backing paper off.

    >
    >The new patches aren't all bad though, at least there is no need to
    >carry a blow-torch to vulcanise the repair anymore...



    Or a small boy to operate the bellows (obviously _not_ allowed in the
    TdF).



    Tim
     
  12. Tim Woodall wrote:
    > With three punctures in a week (slow in the rear went flat overnight
    > then slow in the front ditto and then tonight a roadside change for the
    > rear) I've patched some innertubes for the first time in years. As I was
    > changing the tires I decided I might as well and then keep some new
    > tubes for the next puncture and put some patched tubes in now.
    >
    > But the patches are different from what I remember. My patches are on
    > paper with a foil covering them. The foil peels of easily but I can't
    > get the backing paper off. The first one I tried to get it off after
    > sticking the patch on the tube, gave up, but it was too late and I had
    > to pull the patch off the tube and start again.
    >
    > So I've left the paper on.
    >
    > What do others do?
    >
    > Tim.
    >
    >

    I gave up with these type of patches and now use self sticky ones.
    Several people seem to have trouble with these but I have always found
    them to be reliable. The make to go for is Park.

    --
    Regards, Kenneth.
    www.kmiles.co.uk
     
  13. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Tim Hall
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > On Wed, 30 Nov 2005 00:09:51 +0000 (GMT), Sandy Morton
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>In article <[email protected]>,
    >> Tim Woodall <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> So I've left the paper on.

    >>
    >>> What do others do?

    >>
    >>Leave the paper/film on - saves time.

    >
    > But if you feel you _must_ get the paper off, place finger at 12
    > o'clock and thumb at 6 o'clock on the newly applied patch, Squeeze,
    > such that the patch folds along the 3 o'clock - 9 o'clock line. This
    > will cause the paper to crack, allowing ot to be carefully removed
    > working from the middle out.


    Alternative method: when the glue has /firmly/ set, stretch the
    tube /across/ the patch. The tube will stretch, the patch will stretch,
    the film will not stretch, hence it will tear and come off easily. Works
    with Tip-Top brand patches, which in my experience are the best.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    Ring of great evil
    Small one casts it into flame
    Bringing rise of Men ;; gonzoron
     
  14. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, turkeytickler
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > LSMike wrote:
    >> turkeytickler wrote:
    >>
    >>>agreed - only do then when the patch has been on for about 10 mins or
    >>>more - this caught me out when i tried it after 1 minute and the patch
    >>>slid off!! :-(

    >>
    >>
    >> That makes me think you put the patch on when the solution was still
    >> wet!
    >>

    > yes :-|


    Don't. Let the glue dry before you put the patch on. It can't dry after,
    because it dries by evaporation of volatiles and the patch is
    impermeable.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    <p>Schroedinger's cat is <blink><strong>NOT</strong></blink> dead.</p>
     
  15. Clive George

    Clive George Guest

    "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > Alternative method: when the glue has /firmly/ set, stretch the
    > tube /across/ the patch. The tube will stretch, the patch will stretch,
    > the film will not stretch, hence it will tear and come off easily. Works
    > with Tip-Top brand patches, which in my experience are the best.


    Tip-Tops have the film slightly perforated to help with this.

    (and I'll second the recommendation)

    cheers,
    clive
     
  16. davek

    davek Guest

    Clive George wrote:
    > (and I'll second the recommendation)


    and I'll third it

    d.
     
  17. Kenneth Miles <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I gave up with these type of patches and now use self sticky ones.
    > Several people seem to have trouble with these but I have always found
    > them to be reliable. The make to go for is Park.


    <fx: Recalls experiences with these on the Rural South 300. Froths at the
    mouth. Gibbers uncontrollably>

    I bung the newly-repaired tube in the "spares" bag and remove the paper the
    next time the P+nct+r+ Fairy requires the installation of an Unholey tube.

    --
    Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
    Is it an Audi A4?
     
  18. POHB

    POHB Guest

    I overheard in the bike shop that the self-stickies aren't any good for road
    tyre pressures.
    Can't remember exactly but maybe over 80 PSI?
    Or maybe it was just a particular brand.

    >>

    > I gave up with these type of patches and now use self sticky ones.
    > Several people seem to have trouble with these but I have always found
    > them to be reliable. The make to go for is Park.
    >
     
  19. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    POHB wrote:
    > I overheard in the bike shop that the self-stickies aren't any good
    > for road tyre pressures.
    > Can't remember exactly but maybe over 80 PSI?
    > Or maybe it was just a particular brand.


    It's a myth, I think. With whatever sort of patch, the higher the
    pressure, the harder it is effectively pressed against the tube by the
    tyre casing. This must be a good thing.

    I've had Giyo glueless patches take 130 psi, I've had them fail at 40 psi,
    and vice versa. "Normal" patches are much more consistant and reliable,
    IME. Maybe Park's are better, I dunno.

    ~PB
     
  20. davek <[email protected]>typed


    > Clive George wrote:
    > > (and I'll second the recommendation)

    <Tip Top>

    > and I'll third it


    Umpteenth

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected]
    Edgware.
     
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