"Fixing" tire cuts with silicone -- OK?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by John Crankshaw, Feb 6, 2003.

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  1. Got a new front tire with a small cut, maybe from glass or a stone. No bulge, so it's not into the
    cord. My ride-buddies say fill the cut with silicone cement or Shoe-Goo.

    What do you say?
     
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  2. Ken

    Ken Guest

    "John Crankshaw" <[email protected]> wrote in news:qYD0a.24211
    [email protected]:

    > Got a new front tire with a small cut, maybe from glass or a stone. No bulge, so it's not into the
    > cord. My ride-buddies say fill the cut with silicone cement or Shoe-Goo.

    If the cut is small and doesn't cut the cord, I usually seal it with superglue. I suppose the glues
    you mention will work just as well. If the inner cord is damaged, however, I toss the tire.

    Ken
     
  3. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "John Crankshaw" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Got a new front tire with a small cut, maybe from glass or a stone. No bulge, so it's not into the
    > cord. My ride-buddies say fill the cut with silicone cement or Shoe-Goo.
    >
    > What do you say?

    Why bother?

    Robin Hubert
     
  4. "Goop", "Shoe Goop' or Plumber's Goop" all work well to fill the small cuts, so nothing else can
    enter the existing cut and make it bigger. Your tires will look a little funny, sort of like they
    have acne. But what the hey, the stuff works!

    "Robin Hubert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "John Crankshaw" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Got a new front tire with a small cut, maybe from glass or a stone. No bulge, so it's not into
    > > the cord. My ride-buddies say fill the cut with silicone cement or Shoe-Goo.
    > >
    > > What do you say?
    >
    >
    > Why bother?
    >
    > Robin Hubert
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >"John Crankshaw" <[email protected]> wrote in news:qYD0a.24211
    >[email protected]:
    >
    >> Got a new front tire with a small cut, maybe from glass or a stone. No bulge, so it's not into
    >> the cord. My ride-buddies say fill the cut with silicone cement or Shoe-Goo.
    >
    >If the cut is small and doesn't cut the cord, I usually seal it with superglue. I suppose the glues
    >you mention will work just as well. If the inner cord is damaged, however, I toss the tire.

    A while back some company was advertising glue to fix cuts in tires. It was basically superglue.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  6. Mike Elliott

    Mike Elliott Guest

    I read that [email protected] said in article <b20i97$d1t$1 @newsmaster.cc.columbia.edu>, . . .
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > >
    > >
    > >"John Crankshaw" <[email protected]> wrote in news:qYD0a.24211
    > >[email protected]:
    > >
    > >> Got a new front tire with a small cut, maybe from glass or a stone. No bulge, so it's not into
    > >> the cord. My ride-buddies say fill the cut with silicone cement or Shoe-Goo.
    > >
    > >If the cut is small and doesn't cut the cord, I usually seal it with superglue. I suppose the
    > >glues you mention will work just as well. If the inner cord is damaged, however, I toss the tire.
    >
    > A while back some company was advertising glue to fix cuts in tires. It was basically superglue.

    How well could that work? I mean, I've used superglue -- cyanoacrylate -- for various purposes for
    years, and in many applications it's hardly what I'd call "super." In a flexy situation, like a cut
    in a bicycle tire, I can see it holding things together for, oh, 30 seconds?

    MikeE
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>, Mike Elliott
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >How well could that work? I mean, I've used superglue -- cyanoacrylate -- for various purposes for
    >years, and in many applications it's hardly what I'd call "super."

    Oddly enough, for small tire cuts it seems to work amazingly well. It holds for a long, long time.

    Just one of those pleasant surprises.

    Art
     
  8. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...

    >How well could that work? I mean, I've used superglue -- cyanoacrylate -- for various purposes for
    >years, and in many applications it's hardly what I'd call "super." In a flexy situation, like a cut
    >in a bicycle tire, I can see it holding things together for, oh, 30 seconds?

    Maybe that is why I haven't seen it advertised recently. :)
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  9. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > > >"John Crankshaw" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:qYD0a.24211
    > > >[email protected]:
    > > >> Got a new front tire with a small cut, maybe from glass or a stone.
    No
    > > >> bulge, so it's not into the cord. My ride-buddies say fill the cut
    with
    > > >> silicone cement or Shoe-Goo.

    > @newsmaster.cc.columbia.edu>, . . .
    > > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > >If the cut is small and doesn't cut the cord, I usually seal it with superglue. I suppose the
    > > >glues you mention will work just as well. If the inner cord is damaged, however, I toss the
    > > >tire.

    [email protected] said in article <b20i97$d1t$1
    > > I read that A while back some company was advertising glue to fix cuts
    in tires. It was
    > > basically superglue.

    "Mike Elliott" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > How well could that work? I mean, I've used superglue -- cyanoacrylate -- for various purposes for
    > years, and in many applications it's hardly what I'd call "super." In a flexy situation, like a
    > cut in a bicycle tire, I can see it holding things together for, oh, 30 seconds?

    I'm with Mike on that. In the only case where I tried it (pulled out shard of glass, shot super
    glue into cut) the entire glue blob just fell out a few days later due to the normal flexing of
    the rubber.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  10. Mike Elliott wrote:
    >
    >
    > How well could that work? I mean, I've used superglue -- cyanoacrylate -- for various purposes for
    > years, and in many applications it's hardly what I'd call "super." In a flexy situation, like a
    > cut in a bicycle tire, I can see it holding things together for, oh, 30 seconds?
    >
    > MikeE

    Try the gap filling varieties from hobby shops that cater to radio control airplane enthusiasts.
    These work MUCH better, in fact there are formulas for rubber (black CA), than hardware or home
    center super glues.

    I usually toss cut tires, but I've used the good glues in similar situations with excellent results.
    Also keep in mind that CA glues have a limited shelf life, which can be improved by storing them in
    the freezer. Moisture is one of the curing agents, most freezers are pretty dry.

    Barry
     
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