fi'zi:k owners- what is angle of your mount rails?

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by teamgomez, Aug 24, 2006.

  1. teamgomez

    teamgomez New Member

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    Oh my acheing arse...got a thousand miles on the new steed (trek madone w/ fi'zi:k arione saddle) and can't figure out why I can't find a comfortable saddle position. Started w/ saddle level (placed a 2' level on the seat for an even bubble). No pain on 25-30 mile moderate effort rides- started cycling w/ some masochists and on 30 mile max effort ride the seat became painful. 2 days later, did 45 mile ride and discovered that I lost feeling on parts of my part that I'd rather not lose ANY feeling....

    Tried to work hard at shifting my positions on the saddle but the pain in my legs was matching the pain in my arse. Bought the E3 saddle from Performance and while this saddle does provide an 'elevated' flat spot for the sit bones, my sit bones like to slide forward of what I believe is designed seating position. Hit a small dip in road and shock was directly sent to the berries...not good...had to constantly work at keeping sit bones back on seat and it is most uncomfortable...but not painful...so E3 seat ok but not comfortable to sit on at all.

    Went back to Arione for a ride and angled nose down a bit (thompson seat post angle 14 deg) and this makes the rails nearly level with top tube. Still too much discomfort on the saddle to enjoy the ride.

    I'm avg build...6' /180 lbs/32" waist...avg size arse. Any fi'zi:k owners out there that can give me some info on the angle of their mounting rails/seat top? I love the way the saddle feels other than the pain after distance. Oh yeah- performance gel lite shorts. Don't know what I'm missing here:confused: - appreciate your input :)
     
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  2. Macey

    Macey New Member

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    It might just take a while for your bum to get used to it. I recently built up a new bike with an Arione seat. I was already bruised from recently dramatically increasing milage on a crappy old Velo seat, and had trouble getting comfortable with the Arione.

    I started with the Arione rails almost level with the top tube (nose way down) to give the undercarriage a rest, and found it uncomfortable. I then tried every other angle, and ended up sticking with nose slightly down. Next ride was on an indoor trainer, which I always find hard and uncomfortable. Then next time out on the road I put the seat to dead level on the top, and it felt fantastic. No trouble at all since then.

    I think you would probably want to be close to level on the top, because it tends to slide you forwards more than some other seats if you angle it. It's also hard to use the length of the seat if it is angled.
     
  3. Macey

    Macey New Member

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    One other thought - if you are slipping forwards of the position where the sit bones are supported, the seat may be too far back. I found that having my seat further forward made it more comfortable (the 23 mm mark on the rails is just behind the front clamp, 0 mm mark at the back of the rear clamp).

    I also just checked my current angle - the nose is actually 4 mm lower than the highest part of the back of the seat.
     
  4. dhk2

    dhk2 Active Member

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    Believe you're on to the answer here. Due to the length and shape of the Arione, I found I had to set it with the nose further forward in order to get the widest point of the saddle where it needs to be. Like any other saddle, if your sitzbones aren't bearing at the widest point, you'll have pressure where you don't want it. This fit issue is more critical on people with larger frames, since the width of these italian race saddles is pretty marginal for us anyway.
     
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