Flashlight holder

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Doug Goncz, Oct 4, 2004.

  1. Doug Goncz

    Doug Goncz Guest

    If I mount a 4 D cell LED flashlight with 16 LEDs under the boom tube of my
    Lightning Cycle Dynamics Thunderbolt recumbent using a Wald #40 flashlight
    handlbar mount and some hose clamps (www.bikepartsusa.com), will I be able to
    ride safely at night at about 10 mph?

    Will some spacers be required to point the flashlight at a point ahead of the
    front wheel, instead of horizontally? It will be about 20 inches off the
    pavement.

    At what point should I aim the light?

    Or, how large should the circle of light be? A lane width? That's 12 feet here
    in Virginia.

    This will be a frame mounted light with less oscillation with steering than a
    standard handlebar mount. I believe this will be better in every way, allowing
    the light to be pointed more closely at the ground, at a steeper angle than if
    it were handlebar mounted.

    I support the use of rechargeable alkaline batteries and the recharging of
    standard alkaline batteries and have recycled zinc powder from batteries for
    use as a reactant in electrochemical experiments. This can be done with little
    environmental impact if the wash water is absorbed into toweling, dried, and
    disposed to the trash in a plastic bag. Mercury free cells are available.



    Yours,
    Doug Goncz ( ftp://users.aol.com/DGoncz/incoming )
    Student member SAE for one year.
    I love: Dona, Jeff, Kim, Mom, Neelix, Tasha, and Teri, alphabetically.
    I drive: A double-step Thunderbolt with 657% range.
     
    Tags:


  2. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    Doug Goncz wrote:

    > If I mount a 4 D cell LED flashlight with 16 LEDs under the boom tube
    > of my Lightning Cycle Dynamics Thunderbolt recumbent using a Wald #40
    > flashlight handlbar mount and some hose clamps
    > (www.bikepartsusa.com), will I be able to ride safely at night at
    > about 10 mph?
    >
    > Will some spacers be required to point the flashlight at a point
    > ahead of the front wheel, instead of horizontally? It will be about
    > 20 inches off the pavement.
    >
    > At what point should I aim the light?
    >
    > Or, how large should the circle of light be? A lane width? That's 12
    > feet here in Virginia.


    The narrower the spot, the brighter, and vice versa. So if you make your spot
    too wide, it won't be bright enough. Most bike lights seem to have a spot 2-4'
    wide, aimed about 15-30' ahead of the bike, depending on speed. You only need a
    path a few inches wide to be illuminated brightly. But those few inches are
    very important, so you can see what your wheels are about to pass over. The
    spillover light is usually enough to see to the sides.

    Personally, I use a small handlebar light aimed about 15' ahead, plus a helmet
    light aimed up to 30' ahead for higher speeds. If you have a focusable light
    like a Maglite, you can experiment to find what works for you. But 15' ahead
    and 2' wide is probably a good starting point.

    > This will be a frame mounted light with less oscillation with
    > steering than a standard handlebar mount. I believe this will be
    > better in every way, allowing the light to be pointed more closely at
    > the ground, at a steeper angle than if it were handlebar mounted.


    In fact, lower is better in some ways. Many lights are fork mounted for this
    reason.

    > I support the use of rechargeable alkaline batteries and the
    > recharging of standard alkaline batteries and have recycled zinc
    > powder from batteries for use as a reactant in electrochemical
    > experiments. This can be done with little environmental impact if the
    > wash water is absorbed into toweling, dried, and disposed to the
    > trash in a plastic bag. Mercury free cells are available.


    Perhaps, but rechargeables (nicad and NiMH) give much better performance for
    bike lights than alkalines. Rechargeables don't dim as they burn down, like
    alkalines do. And it doesn't take long for rechargeables to pay for themselves.

    Matt O.
     
  3. Doug Goncz writes:

    > If I mount a 4 D cell LED flashlight with 16 LEDs under the boom
    > tube of my Lightning Cycle Dynamics Thunderbolt recumbent using a
    > Wald #40 flashlight handlbar mount and some hose clamps
    > (www.bikepartsusa.com), will I be able to ride safely at night at
    > about 10 mph?


    Oh now I get it. You are a recumbent type where the scientific
    process is in a parallel universe.

    Jobst Brandt
    [email protected]
     
  4. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Jobst Brandt <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Doug Goncz writes:
    >
    >
    >>If I mount a 4 D cell LED flashlight with 16 LEDs under the boom
    >>tube of my Lightning Cycle Dynamics Thunderbolt recumbent using a
    >>Wald #40 flashlight handlbar mount and some hose clamps
    >>(www.bikepartsusa.com), will I be able to ride safely at night at
    >>about 10 mph?

    >
    >
    > Oh now I get it. You are a recumbent type where the scientific
    > process is in a parallel universe.


    Could it be that Mr. Brandt has had the misfortune to encounter more
    than his (statistically probable) share of obnoxious recumbent
    "evangelists", as implied by past comments of his?

    Some of us (present company included) never talk about our bicycles in
    real life to upright riders unless the upright rider expresses interest
    first. Conversely, it has been my experience that it is impossible to
    ride a recumbent without receiving numerous unsolicited derogatory comments

    --
    Tom Sherman
     
  5. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Doug Goncz wrote:

    > ...
    > I support the use of rechargeable alkaline batteries and the recharging of
    > standard alkaline batteries and have recycled zinc powder from batteries for
    > use as a reactant in electrochemical experiments. This can be done with little
    > environmental impact if the wash water is absorbed into toweling, dried, and
    > disposed to the trash in a plastic bag. Mercury free cells are available.


    As someone who built plenty of prototype rechargeable alkaline
    zinc-manganese batteries, I can say there are significant differences in
    internal construction that greatly reduce the likelihood of the internal
    shorting that often occurs when attempting to recharge regular alkaline
    batteries.

    The electrolyte used in alkaline batteries is a mixture of potassium
    hydroxide and zinc oxide, and is relatively harmless when sufficiently
    diluted. Zinc is bad for fish, so it should not be discharged into
    waterways without treatment.

    The last mercury containing alkaline batteries were phased out of the US
    market almost 10 years ago. Current alkaline batteries only contain the
    trace amounts of mercury found in industrial purity zinc.

    Note that wet powered zinc can spontaneously combust upon drying.

    --
    Tom Sherman
     
  6. g.daniels

    g.daniels Guest

    the two light approach is a positive step forward.
    mounting one low on a fork, one high gives the killer pothole visual
    definition for a microsecond avoidance.
    and on course, you are what you eat!
     
  7. Doug Goncz

    Doug Goncz Guest


    >From: [email protected] (g.daniels)


    >the two light approach is a positive step forward.


    I have a two light approach. I use an FL-4 4 AA fluorescent as a marker light
    already. I use the same with a yellow filter as a rear marker. With the
    flashlight, I'll have three lights. Of course, that's a lot of alkaline
    batteries.

    I can use 2/3 AA NiCd cells in the FL-4, but I don't know how long I can hit it
    with 7.2 VDC. It's only designed for 6 VDC. So I might have to use the NiCd
    cells in the rear light, and add a flasher to reduce the duty cycle.

    I am almost sure I can use 5 C NiCd or NiMH cells in the flashlight. They are
    just about the 4/5 D length.

    >mounting one low on a fork, one high gives the killer pothole visual
    >definition for a microsecond avoidance.


    yes, I agree.

    >and on course, you are what you eat!


    of course, I must be made of turkey, salmon, and tuna because that's what I
    eat!

    But if I eat a pothole, do I become the pothole?

    See the pothole, Jedi Biker.
    See the pothole, feel the pothole.
    Eat the pothole, Jedi Biker.
    Eat the pothole, be the pothole.

    ?


    Yours,
    Doug Goncz ( ftp://users.aol.com/DGoncz/incoming )
    Student member SAE for one year.
    I love: Dona, Jeff, Kim, Mom, Neelix, Tasha, and Teri, alphabetically.
    I drive: A double-step Thunderbolt with 657% range.
     
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