Flat bar road bikes.

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Rock Creek Rider, Feb 27, 2021.

  1. Rock Creek Rider

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2017
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    5
    I've gone drop-bar-less. I still have a couple bikes with drop bars, but they are collecting dust.
    I know of other, older, riders that have done the same. Some younger riders too.
    Despite the limited hand positions (one), I just feel safer and more comfortable with flat bars.
    Besides a slightly more upright position, which gives you a better view and is more comfortable, flat bars also give you more leverage and your hands are always in position to brake. I can look at the scenery, rather than my front tire.
    With ergonomic grips, such as those by Ergon, I don't really miss the extra hand positions of drop bars.
    Flat bars are a big reason MTBs became so popular. An awful lot of people were buying them for riding on road riding because they didn't like drop bars..
    At first, I was using my MTB for road rides, and still do.
    Over the winter I had a flat bar gravel bike built up. After I get vaccinated for covid and group rides start up again, I needed a faster road bike than my MTB. Last fall I also bought a flat bar commuter bike.
    I now have three flat bar bikes that would work very well for the sagged tours I like to do.
    I don't rule out going to a drop bar in the future. If I find I can't keep up, on group rides, with my gravel bike, I may pull my road bike out of retirement. But, for now, I only ride flat bars.
     
    Tags:
    Jorg Schlagheck likes this.


  2. Jorg Schlagheck

    Jorg Schlagheck New Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2020
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    2
    I was thinking of building up a vintage frame with flat handlebars. I have them on my touring bike and it enables me to ride all day, rather than just a few hours. Thanks for bringing this up.
     
  3. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2011
    Messages:
    1,202
    Likes Received:
    93
    I'm putting together a Felt F55X which everyone tells me is a cyclocross bike but the wheelbase is too long to be a cyclocross but rather a gravel bike. I had a bunch of components laying around including an XT group with trigger shifters and Avid disks. Of course it has been a pain in the butt since its been one thing after another. I forgot that BB386 bottom brackets are for 30 mm shafts since there are no good 30 mm shaft off-road cranks. So I had to order a special 24 mm ID bearing BB386EVO. Then I ordered new hydraulic lines since the old ones would need the ends cut off to run internally and that would make them just too short. The hydraulic lines should be ordered from Shimano or Avid since the over-the-counter Chinese versions are 0.3 mm too large and will not fit in the hydraulic connectors. Everything else fit perfectly though the through axle 15 mm should be ordered directly from Felt since no one else is making the correct length. The one from Felt works perfectly of course. My wheels were mismatched since they were a centerlock 15 mm front and a 5 bolt dropout rear. I ended up getting a 160 mm disk for both ends and the front is set up for a 140 mm disk of course.

    But otherwise these small problems that are holding me back for another couple of weeks from finishing the flat bar gravel Felt, I'm really impressed on how much bike it is for the money. There are a few things you have to learn for the first time such as how to thread the hydraulic hoses through the internal frame and fork but once you know how it is pretty easy. Too bad the hoses are outside of the maximum dimensions for the connectors.

    I had a Ridley Crossbow before and that had to be the world's worst cyclocross bike. But it was the best gravel bike I ever rode. I'm hoping that this Felt is as good. The measurements give me the idea that it will be. I think that Felt is making a mistake by only carrying aluminum bikes in the lower levels. Properly made they can be as light as carbon fiber bikes and you would be a lot less worried about the bike coming apart in difficult descents.

    As for weight - that stopped being a matter of concern for anyone but pro racers when the weight got under 20 lbs. I have a local loop that I've been riding and my average speed on a 24 lb bike is the same as on the 16 lb bike. Though I think that I'm more fatigued after the 25 miles and 1600 feet of climbing on the heavier bike. Isn't the entire idea of riding to get fatigued?

    In any case, for people that don't like climbing we have almost endless gravel trails around here We also have gravel roads but you have to be careful of cars there. Or dumbass motor cyclists. But they're on country roads as well.

    Flat bats force you upright so that sort of limits the speeds you can make. But XT cranks with a 44 tooth large ring does the same. Imagine being forced to enjoy the ride rather than attempting Strava records?

    I am delighted with the way it is going together. As for bleeding the brakes when I get the proper hoses - that is so easy that it took me 20 minutes to do both ends of a Shimano setup the first time I tried it.
     
  4. cycle cartel

    cycle cartel New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2021
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    I was thinking of building up a vintage frame with flat handlebars. I have them on my touring bike and it enables me to ride all day, rather than just a few hours. Thanks for bringing this up.
     
  5. Germanrazor

    Germanrazor Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2020
    Messages:
    104
    Likes Received:
    45
Loading...
Loading...