Flat bar to drop bar conversion ....



D

DeF

Guest
G'Day, I'm nearing the end of the process of
converting my better half's flat bar roadie to
drop bars. Reason? She did an ITT at Easter
and has got the bug and wants to go faster. She's
commuting about 22km a few times a week and wants
to do that faster as well.

Anyway, I thought I'd share my experience since
it's the first conversion I've done and there are
still some ****ly issues to sort out.

The bike is an Avanti Blade Comp (I think) with
a mixture of shimano triple gear (105,tiagra etc).
I got hold of some Tiagra 9sp STI levers and some
long reach brakes to replace the V-brakes. I got
hold of some second-hand (almost new) bars and I
had a stem lying around the shed.

1st issue: Despite getting long reach brakes,
the rear brake is too short - it needs to be about
10mm longer. I checked the front brake when getting
new calipers and didn't think to check that the rear
might have a different reach. I've had to leave the
V-brakes on the rear which leads to a squishy feeling
rear-brake but it still works. The other problem is
that there is now no adjustment of the rear brake except
via moving the cable clamp. Not very satisfactory.
The front brake works very well.

2nd issue: Trimming cable housing from STI levers.
What's a good guide for this? I'm guessing that you
want them as short as possible but not so short that
they get stressed as the handle bars turn to their
extreme.

Other minor issue - there is no cable adjustment
available for the front dérailleur except the cable
clamp. Not as important as for the rear but still...

For the gears - I was amazed at how easy this was.
I was expecting more drama here but they worked first
time. I just pulled the cable tight with fingers, clamped
it then turned pedals and changed gears. Rear needed
a little adjustment but that was it.

Stuff to do is cosmetic - bar tape, trim cables etc.

Total cost is nearing $300 mark. I've not had the
nerve to work out the actual total yet....

At the end, she has a pretty nice traditional style
touring bike. Lots of braze-ons, 27sp with drop
bars. An excellent middle to long distance commuter
and an excellent bike for touring.

DeF.

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M

Michael Warner

Guest
On Fri, 11 May 2007 10:30:40 +0800, DeF wrote:

> 2nd issue: Trimming cable housing from STI levers.
> What's a good guide for this? I'm guessing that you
> want them as short as possible but not so short that
> they get stressed as the handle bars turn to their
> extreme.


Yes. If you arrange for about an inch of cable crossover
when the bars are straight ahead that should be fine, and
also give you some margin for raising or turning up the bars
later, if desired.

> Other minor issue - there is no cable adjustment
> available for the front dérailleur except the cable
> clamp. Not as important as for the rear but still...


Put one of those little barrel adjusters inline. CF bikes don't
seem to have any other FD cable adjustment these days,
and they work well as long as you don't wear them loose by
fiddling with them too much once set. You don't need on
for the RD cable, though.

--
Home page: http://members.westnet.com.au/mvw
 
B

BT Humble

Guest
DeF wrote:
> 1st issue: Despite getting long reach brakes,
> the rear brake is too short - it needs to be about
> 10mm longer. I checked the front brake when getting
> new calipers and didn't think to check that the rear
> might have a different reach. I've had to leave the
> V-brakes on the rear which leads to a squishy feeling
> rear-brake but it still works. The other problem is
> that there is now no adjustment of the rear brake except
> via moving the cable clamp. Not very satisfactory.
> The front brake works very well.


MTB Cantilever brakes have the same length of cable travel as
calipers, and they'll fit right onto the V-brake bosses. You'd need
one of those cable-sheath-stoppers (I can't think of the correct term
right now) and somewhere to hang it, but it'll work.

The only possible issue would be that it's not the look you're after
(personally, I'd have fitted them at both ends).


BTH
 

Rory Williams

New Member
Sep 3, 2003
144
0
16
BT Humble said:
DeF wrote:
> 1st issue: Despite getting long reach brakes,
> the rear brake is too short - it needs to be about
> 10mm longer. I checked the front brake when getting
> new calipers and didn't think to check that the rear
> might have a different reach. I've had to leave the
> V-brakes on the rear which leads to a squishy feeling
> rear-brake but it still works. The other problem is
> that there is now no adjustment of the rear brake except
> via moving the cable clamp. Not very satisfactory.
> The front brake works very well.


MTB Cantilever brakes have the same length of cable travel as
calipers, and they'll fit right onto the V-brake bosses. You'd need
one of those cable-sheath-stoppers (I can't think of the correct term
right now) and somewhere to hang it, but it'll work.

The only possible issue would be that it's not the look you're after
(personally, I'd have fitted them at both ends).

BTH

To other options:
(1) Diacompe V285 levers (I think that is the right number) to operate the V brakes and bar-end shifters for the gears. My 'dirt road' bike is set up that way

(2) A dropbar lever, v brake adapter. I dont know what their proper name is but there is a thing made to give the correct modulation on V brakes using non-V brake levers. Have a look at Sheldon Brown, he has them somewhere on his sites. I have seen them on bikes around Melbourne, but not for sale since Christie's shut down

RoryW
 
D

DeF

Guest
Rory Williams wrote:
> BT Humble Wrote:
>> DeF wrote:
>>> Some stuff.....

>
> (2) A dropbar lever, v brake adapter. I dont know what their proper
> name is but there is a thing made to give the correct modulation on V
> brakes using non-V brake levers. Have a look at Sheldon Brown, he has
> them somewhere on his sites. I have seen them on bikes around
> Melbourne, but not for sale since Christie's shut down
>
> RoryW
>
>


I have seen that "thing" you refer to. I have just ordered one
from Moruya cycles that should do the trick.


Cheers,
DeF.

--
e-mail: [email protected] finger.murdoch.edu.au
To reply, you'll have to remove your finger.
 

Rory Williams

New Member
Sep 3, 2003
144
0
16
DeF said:
Rory Williams wrote:
> BT Humble Wrote:
>> DeF wrote:
>>> Some stuff.....

>
> (2) A dropbar lever, v brake adapter.
>
> RoryW
>
>


I have seen that "thing" you refer to. I have just ordered one
from Moruya cycles that should do the trick.

Cheers,
DeF.

I would be interested in your opinion of it's effectiveness when you get it all set up. I am thinking about a conversion to drop-bars for our tandem and although I already have some bar end shifters somewhere, brifters might be be nice.

RoryW
 
G

Gags

Guest
"DeF" <""d.farrow\"@your finger.murdoch.edu.au"> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Rory Williams wrote:
>> BT Humble Wrote:
>>> DeF wrote:
>>>> Some stuff.....

>>
>> (2) A dropbar lever, v brake adapter. I dont know what their proper
>> name is but there is a thing made to give the correct modulation on V
>> brakes using non-V brake levers. Have a look at Sheldon Brown, he has
>> them somewhere on his sites. I have seen them on bikes around
>> Melbourne, but not for sale since Christie's shut down
>>
>> RoryW
>>
>>

>
> I have seen that "thing" you refer to. I have just ordered one
> from Moruya cycles that should do the trick.
>


I think the "thing" you are after is called a "travel agent" and it
effectively increases your mechanical advantage at the lever. Don't get it
mixed up with a "rollermajig" that is used for the rear derailleur and
essentially reduces the friction caused by the looping of the cable before
it enters the rear of the derailleur. I used to have one of these on my XT
setup but don't use it anymore as I switched to SRAM and the cable doesn't
need to bend anymore.

Gags