Fluid for chain cleaning

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Jules, Feb 8, 2007.

  1. Jules

    Jules Guest

    So I got a freebie recently - a strange contraption that you crank your
    chain through to clean it and the jockey wheels etc.

    Anyway, it needs to be filled with some kind of cleaning fluid.

    What should I use? Kerosene?

    Cheers,
    Jules
     
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  2. kanangara

    kanangara New Member

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    Water and your favourite surfactant based degreaser. Ct-40 truck wash, d-limonene products, etc

    Parbs
     
  3. Bikesoiler

    Bikesoiler New Member

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    Citrus solvent, from you local stupidmarket.

    http://www.citroclean.com.au/
     
  4. Blue  Heeler

    Blue Heeler Guest

    Jules wrote:

    > So I got a freebie recently - a strange contraption that you crank
    > your chain through to clean it and the jockey wheels etc.
    >
    > Anyway, it needs to be filled with some kind of cleaning fluid.
    >
    > What should I use? Kerosene?
    >


    You will get lots of replies indicating various environmentally
    "sensitive" or "appropriate" chemicals you can use.

    Simple fact is that Kero followed by a good hose off works both faster
    and better......


    (And yes I now have a collection of various citrus cleaners and other
    "friendly to the environment" degreasers - kero knocks them into a
    cocked hat).

    --
     
  5. Brendo

    Brendo Guest

    On Feb 9, 8:40 am, "Blue Heeler" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Jules wrote:
    > > So I got a freebie recently - a strange contraption that you crank
    > > your chain through to clean it and the jockey wheels etc.

    >
    > > Anyway, it needs to be filled with some kind of cleaning fluid.

    >
    > > What should I use? Kerosene?

    >
    > You will get lots of replies indicating various environmentally
    > "sensitive" or "appropriate" chemicals you can use.
    >
    > Simple fact is that Kero followed by a good hose off works both faster
    > and better......
    >
    > (And yes I now have a collection of various citrus cleaners and other
    > "friendly to the environment" degreasers - kero knocks them into a
    > cocked hat).
    >
    > --


    I must agree. I used citrus based solvents in one of those
    contraptions, but last time I removed the chain and cleaned it in a
    container full of kero. Came up like new.

    It is filthy again now, but I think thats the oil I use.

    I bought 5ltrs of Kero at Bunnings for arounr $12.

    Brendo
     
  6. Bikesoiler

    Bikesoiler New Member

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    I call bul$hit on your working faster and better.
    The product I use & recomend is as flameable as kerosene & cleans IMO better and yes I have used both. Petrol MAY clean better but is more hazzardous. I find the Citrus cleaner thiner than kerosene & doesnt leave an oily residue.

    Any solvent will give you a cleaner chain if the chain is removed & washed rather than those "on-the-bike" chain wash devices. I find they spray or drip solvent all over your rim & tyre too.
     
  7. Nick Payne

    Nick Payne Guest

    Kero does the job for me. And I tip it back into a 5L container afterwards -
    by the time the next chain cleaning is due all the crud has settled out to
    the bottom of the container and the used kero is fairly clean. I've been
    using the same lot of kero for years, with the occasional top-up to make up
    for the bit that is lost each time the chain is cleaned.

    Nick

    "Jules" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:D[email protected]
    > So I got a freebie recently - a strange contraption that you crank your
    > chain through to clean it and the jockey wheels etc.
    >
    > Anyway, it needs to be filled with some kind of cleaning fluid.
    >
    > What should I use? Kerosene?
     
  8. Blue  Heeler

    Blue Heeler Guest

    Bikesoiler wrote:

    >
    >
    > I call bul$hit on your working faster and better.


    It's a free country.

    > The product I use & recomend is as flameable as kerosene & cleans IMO
    > better and yes I have used both.


    What it it by the way? Forgive me but I didn't claim kero was the
    absolute all out "besT" cleaner - merely that it is a damm side batter
    than the enivronmentally friendly alternatives.

    > Petrol MAY clean better but is more
    > hazzardous.


    Actually ether or liquid propane will degrease even better than petrol,
    bt the risk to the user does rise even further.

    > I find the Citrus cleaner thiner than kerosene & doesnt
    > leave an oily residue.
    >


    Let's be clear on one thing. Kero is incapable of leaving an "oily
    residue". it aint oily, kero is DRY. The residue it leaves is kero.


    > Any solvent will give you a cleaner chain if the chain is removed &
    > washed rather than those "on-the-bike" chain wash devices.


    But of course

    > I find they
    > spray or drip solvent all over your rim & tyre too.


    I use kero in my "chain machine" - and I reckon it's no bad thing that
    it spreads around a little - a quick blast with the pressure hose and
    all the road grime, dirt, oil and kero is gone from rim, spokes, hub
    and tyre. Likewise the driveway where I do my chain cleaning

    Now, if you can actually show me a "citrus" cleaner that cleans as
    quickly and as easily as kero, and doesn't cost more than 3 times as
    much - I'll buy it.

    --
     
  9. just us

    just us Guest

    Silly me - being a middle aged girl I used a degreaser on my chain :( after
    a grueling 3 day ride. 2 days were rain, one day of sand, soil and wet.
    Then I left it to dry overnight - next day it was showing rust marks!
    Wouldnt the citrus rust also go to "rust" if left to dry for a day or two?
    Kero next time for sure. I had used kero in the past but thought that I
    wanted the bike all new again LOL
    Kathy
     
  10. jur

    jur New Member

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    I used to do the kero in 3 bottles dance. Since then I have moved up to Prolink. A damn sight cheaper, easier, less time-consuming and therefore better, by my experience.
     
  11. matagi

    matagi Well-Known Member

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    Another vote for kero, and if you're worried about the residue dripping onto your rim and tyre, put some rag down to catch the drips.
     
  12. jazmo

    jazmo New Member

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    I have the bike upside down (will eventually get or make a repair stand) and use small amounts of kero poured onto an old paintbrush. I clean the whole drivechange with the stuff - between the cogs and paint it over the chainring and cranks. It all looks a mess until you blast the water over it (from a distance) and everything comes up looking nice and shiny.

    Just wish it would stay that way.
     
  13. Joel Mayes

    Joel Mayes Guest

    On 2007-02-10, jazmo <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > I have the bike upside down (will eventually get or make a repair stand)
    > and use small amounts of kero poured onto an old paintbrush. I clean the
    > whole drivechange with the stuff - between the cogs and paint it over
    > the chainring and cranks. It all looks a mess until you blast the water
    > over it (from a distance) and everything comes up looking nice and
    > shiny.
    >
    > Just wish it would stay that way.


    High presure water + hubs/BB = bad idea

    You're forcing water into the hubs and/or BB, even if they're sealed. This will
    lead to problems in the very near future.

    Much better wipe the gunk of with a rag or two and let the solvent
    evaporate before oiling

    Cheers

    Joel
     
  14. ProfTournesol

    ProfTournesol New Member

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    what you clean the chain with should make no difference to whether it rusts or not (as long as it is clean and dry), it is having metal surfaces exposed to air or any other oxidizing agent, that allows them to oxidize (rust) . If you clean it with a solvent and rub it dry with a rag for a while it will be clean and dry and then you can oil it or Prolink it or whatever.
     
  15. Artoi

    Artoi Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Jules <[email protected]> wrote:

    > So I got a freebie recently - a strange contraption that you crank your
    > chain through to clean it and the jockey wheels etc.
    >
    > Anyway, it needs to be filled with some kind of cleaning fluid.
    >
    > What should I use? Kerosene?


    Citric degreaser is what you are looking for. They are available from
    your LBS.
    --
     
  16. Theo Bekkers

    Theo Bekkers Guest

    Blue Heeler wrote:

    > Now, if you can actually show me a "citrus" cleaner that cleans as
    > quickly and as easily as kero, and doesn't cost more than 3 times as
    > much - I'll buy it.


    That's a pretty safe bet. I use a 50/50 mix of kero and degreaser, cleans
    better and quicker, washes off easier, costs a little more, but not three
    times as much. It's not citrus though.

    Theo
     
  17. jazmo

    jazmo New Member

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    When I said "blast" I was only using that figuratively. I'm actually using a normal hose with trigger nozzle set to either "mist" or that other setting that squirts out big drops at relatively low pressue and a large spread.

    Do you think that's still going to be a problem? I've actually been doing this for a while (once a month for almost 2 years) without problems. I got the idea from seeing pro mechanics do it on TV (with what look like high pressure hoses). Perhaps they keep the jet away from the BB and hubs?

    I used to do it with a rag but just found it fiddly. Hosing down is much quicker.
     
  18. Fractal

    Fractal Guest

    "matagi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Another vote for kero, and if you're worried about the residue dripping
    > onto your rim and tyre, put some rag down to catch the drips.
    >
    >
    > --
    > matagi
    >


    More worried about kerosene getting into the environment - cant be good to
    wash it away or let it evaporate. Best to control incinerate it, ie not in
    the barbie, according to one thing I read. Also shouldnt mix with petrol, or
    atomise with compressed air like some auto workshops do. Ultrasonics may be
    the next big thing in cleaning.
     
  19. Joel Mayes

    Joel Mayes Guest

    On 2007-02-11, jazmo <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Joel Mayes Wrote:
    >> Much better wipe the gunk of with a rag or two and let the solvent
    >> evaporate before oiling
    >>
    >> Cheers
    >>
    >> Joel

    >
    > When I said "blast" I was only using that figuratively. I'm actually
    > using a normal hose with trigger nozzle set to either "mist" or that
    > other setting that squirts out big drops at relatively low pressue and
    > a large spread.
    >
    > Do you think that's still going to be a problem? I've actually been
    > doing this for a while (once a month for almost 2 years) without
    > problems. I got the idea from seeing pro mechanics do it on TV (with
    > what look like high pressure hoses). Perhaps they keep the jet away
    > from the BB and hubs?
    >
    > I used to do it with a rag but just found it fiddly. Hosing down is
    > much quicker.


    With low presure and good seals I guess it no worse then riding through
    a puddle or rain. Pro-mechanics do get it wrong too though.

    I'm constantly see people at the how've had their bikes stuffed by
    mechanics at their LBS, often really dumb things like a lady who came in
    on an old single speed with coaster brakes saying the chain was
    constantly droping and leaving her with no brakes.

    Apparently the problem started after she went to her LBS 'cause the tyre
    was rubbing on the mud-guards. Rather then adjusting the stays the
    mechanics shifted the wheel forward in the drop-outs.

    Cheers

    Joel
     
  20. Dave

    Dave Guest

    On Mon, 12 Feb 2007 04:26:21 +0000, Fractal wrote:

    > Ultrasonics may be the next big thing in cleaning.


    I've got a 1L or so generic ultrasonic cleaner. It's great for loosening
    gunge on small parts, and for cleaning jewelery, but I've tried it on
    dirty chains a couple of times with citrus degreaser and water and it's
    not particularly effective. A more powerful version may do better, but
    kero in a can does a much better job.

    For things like clusters it can be good to blast it in the cleaner, then
    wipe it down. The bubbles formed tend to loosen the gunge, but it's too
    thick and tacky to come totally loose.

    --
    Dave Hughes | [email protected]
    "Contrary to popular belief, Unix is user friendly. It just happens to
    be very selective about who its friends are" -- Kyle Hearn
     
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