Fluids

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Simonb, Jul 18, 2004.

  1. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    On my ride this afternoon, bursting for a pee, I was wondering whether the
    body is able to draw on fluid stored in the bladder, or whether, once it's
    in there, it's waste and the body cannot use it? Anyone know?
     
    Tags:


  2. On Sun, 18 Jul 2004 21:16:25 +0100, in
    <[email protected]>, "Simonb"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On my ride this afternoon, bursting for a pee, I was wondering whether the
    >body is able to draw on fluid stored in the bladder, or whether, once it's
    >in there, it's waste and the body cannot use it? Anyone know?


    Once it's there it's useless. Unless you fit a second hose to your
    camelback.


    --
    I remember when the internet was only in black & white.
    It only had a few pages but at least they all worked.
     
  3. moet

    moet New Member

    Joined:
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    How funny, I remember asking exactly the same question of my biology teacher 26 years ago. The answer is no.
    It's a funny feeling to be desperate for a pee and incredibly thirsty at the same time.
     
  4. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    moet wrote:
    > Simonb Wrote:
    >> On my ride this afternoon, bursting for a pee, I was wondering
    >> whether the
    >> body is able to draw on fluid stored in the bladder, or whether, once
    >> it's
    >> in there, it's waste and the body cannot use it? Anyone know?

    >
    > How funny, I remember asking exactly the same question of my biology
    > teacher 26 years ago. The answer is no.
    > It's a funny feeling to be desperate for a pee and incredibly thirsty
    > at the same time.


    I wonder why not? You'd think that if the body was in danger of becoming
    dehydrated, it'd be usful.
     
  5. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    Simonb wondered:
    >>>whether the
    >>>body is able to draw on fluid stored in the bladder, or whether, once
    >>>it's
    >>>in there, it's waste and the body cannot use it? Anyone know?

    >
    > I wonder why not? You'd think that if the body was in danger of becoming
    > dehydrated, it'd be usful.


    Conserving water is the function of the kidneys. If your body's running
    low on water then the kidneys will conserve more of it, producing
    smaller volumes of more concentrated urine to pass to the bladder. The
    function of the bladder is to hang on to the waste products from the
    kidneys until there's a convenient moment to get rid of it.

    --
    Danny Colyer (the UK company has been laughed out of my reply address)
    <URL:http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/danny/>
    "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." - Thomas Paine
     
  6. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    Simonb wrote:

    > moet wrote:
    >
    >>Simonb Wrote:
    >>
    >>>On my ride this afternoon, bursting for a pee, I was wondering
    >>>whether the
    >>>body is able to draw on fluid stored in the bladder, or whether, once
    >>>it's
    >>>in there, it's waste and the body cannot use it? Anyone know?

    >>
    >>How funny, I remember asking exactly the same question of my biology
    >>teacher 26 years ago. The answer is no.
    >>It's a funny feeling to be desperate for a pee and incredibly thirsty
    >>at the same time.

    >
    >
    > I wonder why not? You'd think that if the body was in danger of becoming
    > dehydrated, it'd be usful.
    >
    >


    Think about it though, by the time you're dehydrated, the body has
    already scaled back pee production quite significantly - what there is,
    is highly concentrated with the toxins and waste products your body
    wants to be rid of. In fact, it's probably not sufficient to actually
    clear the toxins out of the system fully - so there really isn't a lot
    in there that the body could find useful to recover, it's already
    attempted that bit further up the processing line ;-)


    --


    Velvet
     
  7. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    Velvet wrote:

    > Think about it though, by the time you're dehydrated, the body has
    > already scaled back pee production quite significantly - what there
    > is, is highly concentrated with the toxins and waste products your
    > body wants to be rid of. In fact, it's probably not sufficient to
    > actually clear the toxins out of the system fully - so there really
    > isn't a lot in there that the body could find useful to recover, it's
    > already attempted that bit further up the processing line ;-)


    You lot! How'd you all come to be so damn clever?

    :)
     
  8. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    Simonb wrote:

    > Velvet wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Think about it though, by the time you're dehydrated, the body has
    >>already scaled back pee production quite significantly - what there
    >>is, is highly concentrated with the toxins and waste products your
    >>body wants to be rid of. In fact, it's probably not sufficient to
    >>actually clear the toxins out of the system fully - so there really
    >>isn't a lot in there that the body could find useful to recover, it's
    >>already attempted that bit further up the processing line ;-)

    >
    >
    > You lot! How'd you all come to be so damn clever?
    >
    > :)
    >
    >

    I had to do *something* with my time before I got hooked on this cycling
    thing ;-)

    --


    Velvet
     
  9. Iain Jones

    Iain Jones Guest

    Danny Colyer <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Simonb wondered:
    >>>>whether the
    >>>>body is able to draw on fluid stored in the bladder, or whether, once
    >>>>it's
    >>>>in there, it's waste and the body cannot use it? Anyone know?

    >>
    >> I wonder why not? You'd think that if the body was in danger of becoming
    >> dehydrated, it'd be usful.

    >
    > Conserving water is the function of the kidneys. If your body's running
    > low on water then the kidneys will conserve more of it, producing
    > smaller volumes of more concentrated urine to pass to the bladder. The
    > function of the bladder is to hang on to the waste products from the
    > kidneys until there's a convenient moment to get rid of it.
    >


    So that explains why darker urine is a sign of being dehydrated? Isn't the
    internet great ;-)
     
  10. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    Iain Jones wrote:

    > Danny Colyer <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >
    >>Simonb wondered:
    >>
    >>>>>whether the
    >>>>>body is able to draw on fluid stored in the bladder, or whether, once
    >>>>>it's
    >>>>>in there, it's waste and the body cannot use it? Anyone know?
    >>>
    >>>I wonder why not? You'd think that if the body was in danger of becoming
    >>>dehydrated, it'd be usful.

    >>
    >>Conserving water is the function of the kidneys. If your body's running
    >>low on water then the kidneys will conserve more of it, producing
    >>smaller volumes of more concentrated urine to pass to the bladder. The
    >>function of the bladder is to hang on to the waste products from the
    >>kidneys until there's a convenient moment to get rid of it.
    >>

    >
    >
    > So that explains why darker urine is a sign of being dehydrated? Isn't the
    > internet great ;-)


    Yup!

    --


    Velvet
     
  11. James Hodson

    James Hodson Guest

    On Sun, 18 Jul 2004 23:18:02 +0100, "Simonb"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >You lot! How'd you all come to be so damn clever?


    I'm really quite a thicko
    as most of you can tell.
    I leant my stuff from't Daily Mail
    And u.r.c as well.

    James
     
  12. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    James Hodson wrote:
    > On Sun, 18 Jul 2004 23:18:02 +0100, "Simonb"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> You lot! How'd you all come to be so damn clever?

    >
    > I'm really quite a thicko
    > as most of you can tell.
    > I leant my stuff from't Daily Mail
    > And u.r.c as well.
    >
    > James


    Hooray!
     
  13. James Hodson

    James Hodson Guest

    On Tue, 20 Jul 2004 12:38:47 +0100, "Simonb"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >James Hodson wrote:
    >> On Sun, 18 Jul 2004 23:18:02 +0100, "Simonb"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> You lot! How'd you all come to be so damn clever?

    >>
    >> I'm really quite a thicko
    >> as most of you can tell.
    >> I leant my stuff from't Daily Mail
    >> And u.r.c as well.


    >
    >Hooray!
    >


    If only I were lying. :-0

    James
     
  14. JuneBug

    JuneBug New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2003
    Messages:
    184
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    0
    and yet urine is sterile.

    we can use it to wash wounds with. but not to drink. i dont think we can drink it. what if you stopped to boil it??? i am talking in a desperate situation here.

    I dont know. then you'd have to carry a pot and some flint with you on your bike outings.
     
  15. JuneBug <[email protected]> writes:

    > Velvet Wrote:
    > > In fact, it's probably not sufficient to actually
    > > clear the toxins out of the system fully - so there really isn't a lot
    > > in there that the body could find useful to recover, it's already
    > > attempted that bit further up the processing line ;-)Velvet

    >
    > and yet urine is sterile.
    >
    > we can use it to wash wounds with. but not to drink. i dont think we
    > can drink it. what if you stopped to boil it??? i am talking in a
    > desperate situation here.


    Won't be harmful if it's not the urine of a dehydrated person,
    i.e. less saturated than the max your kidneys can make. If it is, it
    may make you lose some water getting rid of it.

    There's people who drink urine. AFAICT, urine's mainly considered
    unpleasant because of social reasons, i.e. if something smells of
    piss, it's cause there's been someone else there marking it as
    theirs. I don't think we're as far removed from dogs as we like to
    think.

    A
     
  16. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    JuneBug wrote:

    > Velvet Wrote:
    >
    >> In fact, it's probably not sufficient to actually
    >>clear the toxins out of the system fully - so there really isn't a lot
    >>in there that the body could find useful to recover, it's already
    >>attempted that bit further up the processing line ;-)Velvet

    >
    >
    > and yet urine is sterile.
    >
    > we can use it to wash wounds with. but not to drink. i dont think we
    > can drink it. what if you stopped to boil it??? i am talking in a
    > desperate situation here.
    >
    > I dont know. then you'd have to carry a pot and some flint with you on
    > your bike outings.
    >
    >


    People *have* drunk it, where there's no other alternative (ie, at sea)
    but all it does it tip the waste products straight back into the system
    again, and you use far more water than you pee, so you'd continue to
    dehydrate rapidly.

    Boiling it'd just drive off what water there might be - if you could
    condense the steam then that *might* be drinkable in that sort of
    emergency situation, but personally I'd look for natural sources of dew
    in that sort of situation - leaves, grass, etc. Of course it depends on
    the environment as to whether it's possible, but even in the desert you
    can fashion a dew-collector out of a bit of plastic sheeting, a cup, and
    a few supports. Not that I've done so personally, but seen it done :)

    --


    Velvet
     
  17. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    JuneBug [email protected] opined the
    following...
    > and yet urine is sterile.


    Not so much a matter or "sterile" as "toxic".

    > we can use it to wash wounds with.


    Because it contains a concentration of toxins which will probably kill
    many bacteria.

    > but not to drink. i dont think we
    > can drink it. what if you stopped to boil it??? i am talking in a
    > desperate situation here.


    The problem is not that it will infect you, but that it is full of
    toxins which your body was trying to get rid of. This means that you
    have to process it again. In extreme circumstances (e.g. Life raft in
    the middle of an ocean. No fresh water. No equipment with which to
    desalinate the sea water.) it is a better source of water, but since you
    will lose water through sweat it cannot be your only supply or you'll
    soon dehydrate.

    Boiling it will only concentrate it further.

    Jon
     
  18. On Tue, 20 Jul 2004 17:08:30 GMT, Velvet <[email protected]> wrote:
    > JuneBug wrote:
    >
    >> Velvet Wrote:
    >>
    >>> In fact, it's probably not sufficient to actually
    >>>clear the toxins out of the system fully - so there really isn't a lot
    >>>in there that the body could find useful to recover, it's already
    >>>attempted that bit further up the processing line ;-)Velvet

    >>
    >>
    >> and yet urine is sterile.
    >>
    >> we can use it to wash wounds with. but not to drink. i dont think we
    >> can drink it. what if you stopped to boil it??? i am talking in a
    >> desperate situation here.
    >>
    >> I dont know. then you'd have to carry a pot and some flint with you on
    >> your bike outings.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > People *have* drunk it, where there's no other alternative (ie, at sea)


    No some people drink it for "health benefits". Apparently quite popular
    in India and Japan (although some people just gargle).

    --
    Andy Leighton => [email protected]
    "The Lord is my shepherd, but we still lost the sheep dog trials"
    - Robert Rankin, _They Came And Ate Us_
     
  19. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    Andy Leighton [email protected] opined the following...
    > No some people drink it for "health benefits". Apparently quite popular
    > in India and Japan (although some people just gargle).


    Given the proliferation of "Chinese Herbal Doctors" in Edinburgh, I
    sense a fad coming. ;-)

    Jon
     
  20. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, JuneBug
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    >
    > Velvet Wrote:
    >> In fact, it's probably not sufficient to actually
    >> clear the toxins out of the system fully - so there really isn't a
    >> lot in there that the body could find useful to recover, it's already
    >> attempted that bit further up the processing line ;-)Velvet

    >
    > and yet urine is sterile.
    >
    > we can use it to wash wounds with. but not to drink. i dont think
    > we
    > can drink it.


    Many people drink their own urine regularly and consider it
    medicinal(!). Seeing it's concentrated poisons your body was trying to
    get rid of this strikes me as pseudo-pscience up there with homeopathy,
    but you can certainly do it regularly and survive. In an emergency you
    could certainly drink it, although, again, as will in those
    circumstances be even more concentrated, I doubt it would do you much
    good (unless you could distill it).

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; lovely alternative to rice.
     
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