Foinaven and Srath Dionard

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Dave Moore, Jul 3, 2005.

  1. Dave Moore

    Dave Moore Guest

    Hi All,
    I'm toying with a trip up to the far north west and having a look at
    walks and peaks in the area. I quite liked the look of taking in Foinaven
    (amongst others) but from the reports I'm seen, it's quite a trek for a
    single day excursion from the A838. I noticed that there's a track to the
    north-east along Srath Dionard and wondered whether this track was good
    enough to ride a mountain bike on to reduce the trek from the road. Does
    anybody know what the condition of that track is?.

    Also, does anybody have any recommendations for areas/peaks I should visit
    whilst I'm up that way?.

    Ta,
    Dave
     
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  2. pete bland

    pete bland Guest

    On Sun, 3 Jul 2005 19:53:09 +0100, "Dave Moore"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > ...along Srath Dionard and wondered whether this track was good
    > enough to ride a mountain bike on to reduce the trek from the road.


    I can't remember whether the surface is good enough to be bikeable,
    but I do remember thinking that I would never walk back along that
    track again if I could possibly help it. It seemed endless.

    If I was going again to that wonderful area I would see if a linear
    route including both Foinavon and Arkle was feasible - I doubt it
    would be more knackering than doing Foinavon from the north and then
    back via Srath Dionard.

    --
    Pete Bland
     
  3. druidh

    druidh Guest

  4. Russ Clare

    Russ Clare Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Dave Moore <dave_m_moore
    @post2me.freeserve.co.uk> writes
    >I quite liked the look of taking in Foinaven
    >(amongst others) but from the reports I'm seen, it's quite a trek for a
    >single day excursion from the A838.

    A few years ago, I did a round of Arkle and Foinaven from Rhiconich.
    There's a good track on the north side of the Rhiconich River for about
    2km. Then there's 4km of very rough ground before the rocky slopes of
    Arkle. From Ceann Garbh, the last top on Foinaven's main ridge, the
    original track can be regained a short distance from Rhiconich, going
    over a minor lump, Cnoc Liath, in the process.

    Although this is a long route over demanding terrain, I found it quite
    reasonable for a summer outing. It's a spectacular walk with great
    views, and you can see the whole route more or less all day.

    I am surprised not to have seen the route recommended on the web or in
    guide books which invariably suggest an A to B and messing about with
    two cars (not much use to the solo walker). From the map, a round from
    Rhiconich looks like the obvious way of walking the two hills.
    --

    Russ Clare
     
  5. Lindsay

    Lindsay Guest

    Used the Srath Dionard route to climb Foinaven last year. We were
    given a lift in the rear of a pick up with the gammie. The vehicle
    was driven by one of the part owners of the estate who was accompanied
    by his wife both elederly. They were off to do some fishing in the
    River Dionard. (still there when we passed them on our return). The
    track is cycleable as there wasn't much bouncing about in the back of
    the pickup.

    They were happy to see walkers )and I presume cyclists) although they
    did point out that stalking was commencing the following week. I was
    already aware of that as I had already phoned the Estate.

    Worth checking the stalking arrangements first before setting out. We
    were there mid to late August.

    Lindsay
    www.caledoniahilltreks.com
     
  6. Phil Cook

    Phil Cook Guest

    Lindsay wrote:

    >Used the Srath Dionard route to climb Foinaven last year. We were
    >given a lift in the rear of a pick up with the gammie. The vehicle
    >was driven by one of the part owners of the estate who was accompanied
    >by his wife both elederly. They were off to do some fishing in the
    >River Dionard. (still there when we passed them on our return). The
    >track is cycleable as there wasn't much bouncing about in the back of
    >the pickup.
    >
    >They were happy to see walkers )and I presume cyclists) although they
    >did point out that stalking was commencing the following week. I was
    >already aware of that as I had already phoned the Estate.


    There is a sign on the gate by Gulain house implying that cycles are
    not welcome. Since it has no basis in law you may ignore it.

    From Scottish Outdoor Access Code:

    What you can do under access rights

    2.6 You can exercise access rights for recreational purposes, some
    educational activities and certain commercial purposes, and for
    crossing over land and water.

    2.7 “Recreational purposes” is not defined in the legislation. It is
    taken to include:

    ... pastimes, such as watching wildlife, sightseeing, painting,
    photography and enjoying historic sites;
    ... family and social activities, such as short walks, dog walking,
    picnics, playing, sledging, paddling or flying a kite;
    ... active pursuits, such as walking, cycling, horse riding and
    carriage driving, rock climbing, hill-walking, running, orienteering,
    ski touring, ski mountaineering, caving, canoeing, swimming, rowing,
    windsurfing, sailing, diving, air sports and wild camping; and
    ... participation in events, such as walking or cycling festivals, hill
    running races, mountain marathons, mountain biking competitions,
    long-distance riding events, orienteering events and canoeing
    competitions.
    --
    Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"
     
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