Folding bike : Trek F400 or F600 ?



Hi,

I am considering bying a folding bike. The only one available in my
area (Luxembourg) is a trek but I can't find any decent information
about it .

How much does it weight ?
Is it OK for tall riders ?
Is the frame stiff ?


Regards,

Eric
 
A

araby

Guest
<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> There no information about the weight of the bike on their Website.....
>

Trek don't quote weights, as for most of their models there are differences
in frame size, specs. etc. At least that's their story:)
However if you assume 24-26lb, you won't be far off. Why is weight so
important anyway?
If you want to expand your knowledge on folders, visit
http://www.nordicgroup.us/fold/

Cheers,

Roy
 
araby wrote:
> <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > There no information about the weight of the bike on their Website.....
> >

> Trek don't quote weights, as for most of their models there are differences
> in frame size, specs. etc. At least that's their story:)
> However if you assume 24-26lb, you won't be far off. Why is weight so
> important anyway?


Weight is arguably more important for folders than for most bikes.
You're expected to pick up and carry a folding bike from time to time!

- Frank Krygowski
 
S

SMS

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I am considering bying a folding bike. The only one available in my
> area (Luxembourg) is a trek but I can't find any decent information
> about it .


Designed and manufactured by Dahon

> How much does it weight ?


26.8 pounds

> Is it OK for tall riders ?


If it's the same as other Dahon bikes, it should be around 6'4"

> Is the frame stiff ?


Yes, but the long steer-tube, the fact that the handlebars are almost
directly above the wheel, and the long seat post, do affect handling.

Great thing about a folding bicycle, you can buy it in another country,
and take it home with you on the train! I'd recommend the Dahon Speed TR.
 
J

Just zis Guy, you know?

Guest
On 18 Dec 2005 10:32:14 -0800, [email protected] said in
<[email protected]>:

>I am considering bying a folding bike. The only one available in my
>area (Luxembourg) is a trek but I can't find any decent information
>about it .


For tall riders I recommend the Brompton. Also I recommend it for
short riders, and for families with both tall and short riders looking
to share a bike...

Guy
--
May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

85% of helmet statistics are made up, 69% of them at CHS, Puget Sound
 
J

Jeff Williams

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> araby wrote:
>
>><[email protected]> wrote in message
>>news:[email protected]
>>
>>>There no information about the weight of the bike on their Website.....
>>>

>>
>>Trek don't quote weights, as for most of their models there are differences
>>in frame size, specs. etc. At least that's their story:)
>>However if you assume 24-26lb, you won't be far off. Why is weight so
>>important anyway?

>
>
> Weight is arguably more important for folders than for most bikes.
> You're expected to pick up and carry a folding bike from time to time!
>
> - Frank Krygowski
>


Beyond picking it up and carrying it, you might also want to put it in a
case and ship it as cargo on a plane, train, bus...
 
G

gds

Guest
Not to hijach the thread too much but a couple of questions on folding
bikes from someone who knows nothing about them.
1) Are they rideable (comfortably)for distances over 25 miles?
2) What, if any, is the speed discount to a road bike given moderately
hilly roads?

Just wondering. I see folks on them doing centuries and such and they
seem to be struggling more than most. I assume it's the bike more than
the rider but really don't know.
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, gds
([email protected]) wrote:
> Not to hijach the thread too much but a couple of questions on folding
> bikes from someone who knows nothing about them.
> 1) Are they rideable (comfortably)for distances over 25 miles?
> 2) What, if any, is the speed discount to a road bike given moderately
> hilly roads?
>
> Just wondering. I see folks on them doing centuries and such and they
> seem to be struggling more than most. I assume it's the bike more than
> the rider but really don't know.


There is a school of thought which reckons that if one wants a bicycle,
one should buy a bicycle, and if one wants something which folds, one
should buy a deckchair...

However, as a rule of thumb, the better it rides, the less well it
folds. I see a lot of people doing 200 km brevets on Airnimals, for
example, and they don't seem to be suffering unduly. But that's about
the /only/ even remotely foldable machine I see out and about on long
rides. Though I do know that at least one maniac has done the 1400 km
London-Edinburgh-London on a Brompton, so anything is possible.

--
Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
I'm just a primitive creature of the heath, so pardon my savage
ignorance.
 
S

SMS

Guest
gds wrote:
> Not to hijach the thread too much but a couple of questions on folding
> bikes from someone who knows nothing about them.
> 1) Are they rideable (comfortably)for distances over 25 miles?


Yes, depending on the folder. Riding my Brompton is not something I'd
enjoy for long distances. OTOH, the Dahon Speed TR or the Montague Urban
are just fine for long rides.

> 2) What, if any, is the speed discount to a road bike given moderately
> hilly roads?


Again, depends on the folder. I wouldn't even try the Brompton on hilly
roads (well I have done it, but it wasn't enjoyable). OTOH, with a Trek
F400/F600, Dahon Speed, or Bike Friday, it'd be just fine.
 
S

SMS

Guest
Dave Larrington wrote:

> However, as a rule of thumb, the better it rides, the less well it
> folds.


Well I'd modify that, but saying the better it rides, the less small
that it folds. There are some excellent folders but they don't fold up
like a Brompton. I.e. "http://dahon.com/allegro.htm" and
"http://www.montagueco.com/productdx.html."

The Bike Friday's, and some of the higher end Dahon's are a good
compromise between ride quality and folded size, as is the Birdy. While
I love my Brompton, I have to admit that the ride quality leaves a lot
to be desired.
 
J

Just zis Guy, you know?

Guest
On 19 Dec 2005 07:46:22 -0800, "gds" <[email protected]> said in
<[email protected]>:

>1) Are they rideable (comfortably)for distances over 25 miles?


Yes, I know at least two people who use Bromptons as their only bikes,
including one who has completed century rides on his. I have ridden
mine 50 miles in a day without problems. It is slightly slower than
my other bikes, due to limited gears.

The Giant Halfway is also reportedly good, as is the Birdy.

>2) What, if any, is the speed discount to a road bike given moderately
>hilly roads?


About 10% in my experience, depending on gears and pedals.

Demountables like the Airnimal and Bike Friday offer little if any
penalty over a non-packing bike, but of course they don't fold in 15
seconds like the Brompton does.

Guy
--
May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

85% of helmet statistics are made up, 69% of them at CHS, Puget Sound
 
Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:
> On 19 Dec 2005 07:46:22 -0800, "gds" <[email protected]> said in
> <[email protected]>:
>
> >1) Are they rideable (comfortably)for distances over 25 miles?

>
> Yes, I know at least two people who use Bromptons as their only bikes,
> including one who has completed century rides on his. I have ridden
> mine 50 miles in a day without problems. It is slightly slower than
> my other bikes, due to limited gears.
>
> The Giant Halfway is also reportedly good, as is the Birdy.


I've been a bit suspicious of the Halfway, with it's one-sided fork and
cantilevered hubs. Anybody know about maintaining such things?

I tend to buy bikes for the long haul - like, 15 years - and would hate
to hear "Sorry, those hubs aren't made any more. Throw away that
bike."

- Frank Krygowski
 
G

gds

Guest
Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:
>>
> >2) What, if any, is the speed discount to a road bike given moderately
> >hilly roads?

>
> About 10% in my experience, depending on gears and pedals.
>
> Demountables like the Airnimal and Bike Friday offer little if any
> penalty over a non-packing bike, but of course they don't fold in 15
> seconds like the Brompton does.
>
>

That's interesting! Is it thought that the reduced speed is mainly
attributable to the upright position or gearing or what? I'd think that
a full size mountain bike has at least a 10% speed discount to a road
bike. So the foldables are roughly the same.
 
M

Matt O'Toole

Guest
On Mon, 19 Dec 2005 11:40:47 -0800, frkrygow wrote:

> Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:


>> On 19 Dec 2005 07:46:22 -0800, "gds" <[email protected]> said in
>> <[email protected]>:


>> >1) Are they rideable (comfortably)for distances over 25 miles?


>> Yes, I know at least two people who use Bromptons as their only bikes,
>> including one who has completed century rides on his. I have ridden mine
>> 50 miles in a day without problems. It is slightly slower than my other
>> bikes, due to limited gears.


>> The Giant Halfway is also reportedly good, as is the Birdy.


> I've been a bit suspicious of the Halfway, with it's one-sided fork and
> cantilevered hubs. Anybody know about maintaining such things?


> I tend to buy bikes for the long haul - like, 15 years - and would hate to
> hear "Sorry, those hubs aren't made any more. Throw away that bike."


I think the same way, but OTOH, there's always some geek hoarding parts
for almost anything somewhere. I know people still running Suntour gear
that's been unavailable for years. Helicomatic stuff too.

What bugs me is when something fails just before a ride that's important
to me, and I can't get a replacement immediately, like *right now.* LBS
are often not real sharp about getting on this stuff either. They forget
to make calls for days, etc. So I prefer to be self-sufficient, and use
stuff that's widely available (new or used), at non-ream-ya prices.

Matt O.
 
S

SMS

Guest
Jeff Williams wrote:

> Beyond picking it up and carrying it, you might also want to put it in a
> case and ship it as cargo on a plane, train, bus...


Too bad that the folders tend to be heavier than cumbersomes. A Brompton
T3, fully equipped, weighs approximately 12.9kg, 28.41b.

The extra bits and pieces for the folding, and the fact that most are
steel rather than aluminum contributes to this. Dahon has some folders
that are around 20 pounds.

I really like the Brompton for what it is. I can ride to the
supermarket, fold it up in about eight seconds, and put in into the
shopping cart. It's a great bike to take in the car or on the train. But
it isn't a great choice for long rides, or very hilly rides. I would not
have bought the UK manufactured Brompton unless I was using it daily on
a train or bus. I bought the Taiwanese Brompton for $235 (four of them
actually) and they are fine, though not nearly as good as the present
production of the UK Brompton.
 
Matt O'Toole wrote:
> I know people still running Suntour gear
> that's been unavailable for years.


Heh. I know somebody doing that. Know him well. Because it's me.
;-)

It helps that a buddy of mine gave me a pretty complete SunTour
sprocket board when he closed his little bike shop!

- Frank Krygowski
 
T

Tom Keats

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
SMS <[email protected]> writes:

> I really like the Brompton for what it is. I can ride to the
> supermarket, fold it up in about eight seconds, and put in into the
> shopping cart. It's a great bike to take in the car or on the train. But
> it isn't a great choice for long rides, or very hilly rides.


For a combination of long/hilly rides and some degree of portability
for occasional travel, I'd be inclined to investigate and consider
S&S Couplers.


cheers,
Tom

--
-- Nothing is safe from me.
Above address is just a spam midden.
I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
 
J

Just zis Guy, you know?

Guest
On Mon, 19 Dec 2005 13:44:44 -0800, [email protected] (Tom Keats)
said in <[email protected]>:

>For a combination of long/hilly rides and some degree of portability
>for occasional travel, I'd be inclined to investigate and consider
>S&S Couplers.


Or a Bike Friday. Or maybe a New Series Moulton (drool)

Guy
--
May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

85% of helmet statistics are made up, 69% of them at CHS, Puget Sound