Folding Bikes on Planes - Advice Sought

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Elisa Francesca Roselli, Jan 24, 2006.

  1. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Elisa Francesca
    Roselli ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > [email protected] a écrit :
    >
    >> You'll need a pump anyway, but the really quick thing is co2 cylinders
    >> from mike dyason
    >> http://www.mwdyason.ltd.uk/shop
    >> Cool.

    >
    > Doubt they'd be allowed on planes, though.


    Buy them at the far end. Every bike shop has them these days. But do
    practice using one first - there is enough gas in one to pump a tyre up
    hard, but there's none to waste.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/


    ... a mild, inoffensive sadist...
     


  2. Elisa Francesca Roselli wrote:
    > I'm thinking about booking a cycling holiday in Bohemia this Spring.
    > Although the tour operator provides bikes for rent, I was so
    > uncomfortable on my rented bike on a similar holiday in the Netherlands
    > last year, that I'm thinking of bringing my beloved Dahon folding bike,
    > Flyzipper....
    >
    > This pits me against the problem of having to fly with him round-trip to
    > Prague from Paris. Dahon sells a special air-travel suitcase for its
    > folding bikes...


    This may sound silly, but are you positive you _need_ to fold the bike
    to fly it?

    Years ago, we traveled from New York to London Heathrow on British
    Airways with our standard bikes. At least at that time, weren't
    required to do anything but remove pedals and turn handlebars sideways.
    Even our panniers stayed in place. It's my understanding that this is
    still policy for some airlines.

    If the bike goes on the plane looking like a bike, it needs much less
    protection; the baggage handlers will treat it with reasonable care.
    OTOH, on a different overseas flight (different airline, charter
    flight) we were forced to box our bikes. Despite copious pleas for
    gentleness, "This side up" etc, we watched with horror as the boxed
    bikes were tossed from the roof of a truck's cab to the ground below.

    See if they'll take it unfolded.

    - Frank Krygowski
     
  3. [email protected] a écrit :

    > See if they'll take it unfolded.


    I'll phone the various airlines for more details. Unfortunately, Air
    France has never even seen a Dahon, so may not know their own policies.
    I would really hope to avoid a situation where the whole thing needs to
    be taken apart, wheels off, etc. and boxed. I am not sure I would know
    how to reassemble it at the other end even if I were carrying a toolbox.
    So far, only a front wheel has ever come off Fly. Even for that I was
    helped by a friend. The wheel went back on the wrong way and it took
    several weeks to get it recalibrated in a bike shop. And the riding
    quality has not been as good since. As for the back wheel, it is
    complicated by a Sram Dualdrive shifter.

    I had naively imagined, when I bought Flyzipper, that the whole point of
    a folding bike was that one could avoid all this palaver.

    The touring company is right to suggest that one leave the bike at home
    and use theirs. But judging from the pictures, their bikes have
    crossbars too high for me to get on comfortably. And I swore never again
    to ride a rented bike after the Netherlands last year.

    EFR
    Ile de France
     
  4. Elisa Francesca Roselli wrote:

    >
    > This pits me against the problem of having to fly with him round-trip to
    > Prague from Paris. Dahon sells a special air-travel suitcase for its
    > folding bikes, guaranteed to protect against scuffs and mistreatment,
    > but it's SO expensive, about 250 Euros, that it will lose me three hotel
    > nights in Prague. Moreover, I won't have much use for it at any other
    > time. Also, having to pack my bike in the suitcase makes it much harder
    > and heavier to transport, since I cannot unfold and roll it and use it
    > as a luggage trolley when I'm making my connections. Getting to the
    > airport will be a nightmare.


    What are the exact requirements by airline? You may not need anything
    too elaborate.

    A few years ago, I flew charter with my bike (regular roadbike) in a
    _BIG_ heavy duty transparent bag ( bought from the local intercity bus
    company for CDN$8.) It was enough to protect the bike and other
    peoples luggage and had the advantage that it was clearly seen as a
    bicycle. Upon arrival I folded up the bag and carried it with me on
    tour as an emergency shelter :) . Back at the airport, out with the bag
    load bike and away.
    John Kane, Kingston ON Canada
     
  5. Elisa Francesca Roselli wrote:
    > [email protected] a écrit :
    >
    > > See if they'll take it unfolded.

    >
    > I'll phone the various airlines for more details. Unfortunately, Air
    > France has never even seen a Dahon, so may not know their own policies.


    Well, it wouldn't be the first time an airline's representatives didn't
    know their own policies. But they don't need to know anything about
    Dahons. The question is "Can I bring my bicycle without putting it in
    a box?" (If they take a standard bike that way, they'll certainly take
    your Dahon.)

    If they answer "yes," your problems are over. If they answer "no" then
    the questions might continue.

    BTW, I've never understood some airlines' attitudes toward bikes. Golf
    clubs and baby carriages seem to be given less hassle. But, on the
    theory that it's maximum linear dimensions that somehow cause them
    trouble, rather than fragility,you could ask about flying the bike
    folded but un-boxed.

    And if you think it's desireable, you might explore flying the bike in
    a soft bag with a little extra padding added for protection.

    - Frank Krygowski
     
  6. Leo Lichtman

    Leo Lichtman Guest

    "Dave Larrington" wrote: Only if you deflate them at the check-in desk...
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    :) Yes, and how would you reinflate them at your destination?

    How about making (or having made) a plywood box that opens and closes with a
    screwdriver?
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>,
    Leo Lichtman ([email protected]) wrote:
    >
    > "Dave Larrington" wrote: Only if you deflate them at the check-in desk...
    > ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    > :) Yes, and how would you reinflate them at your destination?


    Blow into them. Very VERY hard...

    --
    Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
    Murdock's Gardening Law: If it's green, the paving isn't finished yet.
     
  8. Leo Lichtman

    Leo Lichtman Guest

    "Elisa Francesca Roselli" wrote: (clip) since I cannot unfold and roll it
    and use it as a luggage trolley when I'm making my connections.(clip)
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    How does that work (using it as a luggage trolley)? Do you just balance a
    suitcase on the seat while rolling along? To me it sounds kinda klumsy.
     
  9. SMS

    SMS Guest

    Elisa Francesca Roselli wrote:
    > I'm thinking about booking a cycling holiday in Bohemia this Spring.
    > Although the tour operator provides bikes for rent, I was so
    > uncomfortable on my rented bike on a similar holiday in the Netherlands
    > last year, that I'm thinking of bringing my beloved Dahon folding bike,
    > Flyzipper. At least I know I'm comfortable on Fly for hours at a
    > stretch, that he does not give me carpal tunnel syndrome or mangle my
    > soft parts, and that he does not need a fortnight of adjustments before
    > he fits me.


    Elisa:

    See "http://gaerlan.com/dahon/pack.htm" which is a page entitled
    "Packing a 20" Wheeled Dahon Folder for Commercial Air Travel"

    and

    "http://gaerlan.com/bikes/jumbo/jumbo.html"

    This guy sells the suitcases, but I don't know where you could buy it
    where you are. It's a lot cheaper than the Dahon case. I've seen them
    cheaper somewhere once (from one of those Indian owned shops that sells
    overseas electronics stuff in the U.S.) but I can't find the other
    source anymore.

    But you could always use a very large wheeled duffel bag, and pack your
    clothes around the bike to pad it (putting your clothes in zip-lock
    bags). Be very careful of the rear derailleur.
     
  10. SMS

    SMS Guest

    SMS wrote:

    > This guy sells the suitcases, but I don't know where you could buy it
    > where you are. It's a lot cheaper than the Dahon case. I've seen them
    > cheaper somewhere once (from one of those Indian owned shops that sells
    > overseas electronics stuff in the U.S.) but I can't find the other
    > source anymore.


    I did find it, it's http://welectronics.com/luggage.shtml but they don't
    have a picture of it.
     
  11. Leo Lichtman wrote:
    > "Elisa Francesca Roselli" wrote: (clip) since I cannot unfold and roll it
    > and use it as a luggage trolley when I'm making my connections.(clip)
    > ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    > How does that work (using it as a luggage trolley)? Do you just balance a
    > suitcase on the seat while rolling along? To me it sounds kinda klumsy.


    Well see, when I was in the Netherlands I bought two wonderful zipped
    waterproof bags designed for bicycle grocery shopping. They just hook
    onto the baggage rack. On arrival at the shop I unhook them and take
    them in with me in the trolley, pack them at the checkout till and
    rehook them to ride off. Then when I come home I unhook again and tote
    the groceries upstairs. Those two bags can also be used as "weekend
    bags" and the two together should carry enough luggage to get me through
    a week if I travel light.

    So my romantic vision was to just hook up, roll along, unhook and fold
    up at the check-in, on arrival unfold and rehook, and wheel away towards
    Wenceslas Square...


    EFR
    Ile de France
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>,
    Tony Raven <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Pity its not the US. There is a company there which collects your
    > sports equipment from your house and delivers it to you hotel (and vice
    > versa) for a fee.

    *********
    There is? That is SO COOL! What company?
     
  13. Ryan air? Are you talking about flight that burned and crashed in
    Florida? Those were OXYGEN not co2. And they were much bigger than
    the tiny bike co2 carts.
    co2, ie carbon dioxide won't burn.

    But since the crash in Fla, they are looking whereas they weren't
    before.

    Another reason to not allow co2 carts is their other use as a weapon
    power source.

    Rick.
     
  14. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Elisa Francesca
    Roselli ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > I had naively imagined, when I bought Flyzipper, that the whole point
    > of a folding bike was that one could avoid all this palaver.
    >
    > The touring company is right to suggest that one leave the bike at home
    > and use theirs. But judging from the pictures, their bikes have
    > crossbars too high for me to get on comfortably. And I swore never
    > again to ride a rented bike after the Netherlands last year.


    Nil desperandum.

    Three possibilities

    (1) Find a bag (doesn't have to be a hard one, but some padding would be
    good) big enough to take Fly as you would normally fold him. Take the
    plane.

    (2) Take the train (yes, I do understand about fifteen-hour journeys.

    (3) Choose a different holiday nearer home.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    [ This .sig subject to change without notice ]
     
  15. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

  16. Ric

    Ric Guest

    I regularly take my Brompton on flights to Paris Orly as hand luggage, in
    its Brompton soft bag. I unfold it as soon as I am in the arrivals hall,
    ride it through the airport halls, along the travelators, past the Douanes,
    out of the airport, and direct to the RER station.
     
  17. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > If the bike goes on the plane looking like a bike, it needs much less
    > protection; the baggage handlers will treat it with reasonable care.
    > OTOH, on a different overseas flight (different airline, charter
    > flight) we were forced to box our bikes. Despite copious pleas for
    > gentleness, "This side up" etc, we watched with horror as the boxed
    > bikes were tossed from the roof of a truck's cab to the ground below.
    >


    That a long and much disputed debate. There are benefits and
    disadvantages both boxed and unboxed. Bikes get damaged both ways and
    survive both ways depending of the vagaries of the baggage handler you
    get on any day.

    --
    Tony

    "The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
    right."
    - Lord Hailsham
     
  18. But, on the
    theory that it's maximum linear dimensions that somehow cause them
    trouble, rather than fragility,you could ask about flying the bike
    folded but un-boxed.
    And if you think it's desireable, you might explore flying the bike in
    a soft bag with a little extra padding added for protection.

    this does not solve the riding to and from the airport problem, but my
    suitcase is a standard Antler hard round the edges with the two big
    sides soft sizes 11inch by 19inch by 28inch externally.Getting the bike
    in is not at all hard and leaves plenty of space for your socks and
    toothbrush. I was having thoughts of buying some big wheels for the
    case, but these are just pipedreams.
    Second hand cases on ebay are cheap.One on the uk site is myseriously
    full, locked, caveat emptor.I wouldn't get that one.

    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Antler-Blue-a...ryZ11236QQssPageNameZWD1VQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
    May I add that caring too much about your bike can be a disabilty.
    TerryJ
     
  19. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Violet Tigress wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Tony Raven <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Pity its not the US. There is a company there which collects your
    >> sports equipment from your house and delivers it to you hotel (and vice
    >> versa) for a fee.

    > *********
    > There is? That is SO COOL! What company?


    SportsExpress IIRC

    --
    Tony

    "The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
    right."
    - Lord Hailsham
     
Loading...
Loading...