folding handybike

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by [email protected], Jan 29, 2006.

  1. Has anyone tried this thing?
    www.handybike.com

    I am looking for a light foldable bike to take on public transport and
    cycle 10 blocks to and from work. Regular bikes are too cumbersome to
    carry around. I tried a Dahon Presto, it might be OK, but it's still
    heavy (18 lbs, like my racing bike) and it takes forever to fold and
    unfold (and to adjust again and again).
     
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  2. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Has anyone tried this thing?
    > www.handybike.com
    >
    > I am looking for a light foldable bike to take on public transport and
    > cycle 10 blocks to and from work. Regular bikes are too cumbersome to
    > carry around. I tried a Dahon Presto, it might be OK, but it's still
    > heavy (18 lbs, like my racing bike) and it takes forever to fold and
    > unfold (and to adjust again and again).
    >

    ? This is 8 kilograms, which works out to ... 18 pounds.
    The US web site, www.corratecusa.com doesn't seem to work.
    6 inch wheels seem small -- my BikeE (and many folders) have 16 inch wheels,
    and that seems plenty small.
    I haven't tried it, but this cursory look doesn't seem promising. The women
    on the website are photographed well, but that's not much of a reason to buy
    the bike.
     
  3. SMS

    SMS Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Has anyone tried this thing?
    > www.handybike.com
    >
    > I am looking for a light foldable bike to take on public transport and
    > cycle 10 blocks to and from work. Regular bikes are too cumbersome to
    > carry around. I tried a Dahon Presto, it might be OK, but it's still
    > heavy (18 lbs, like my racing bike) and it takes forever to fold and
    > unfold (and to adjust again and again).


    18 pounds is actually quite light for a folding bicycle. The Brompton is
    12.8 kg, unless you opt for the titanium model. The Presto Lite would
    be a good choice, and once you learn how to fold/unfold it, it won't
    take forever.
     
  4. See, when folded the Dahon is not significantly more convenient to
    carry around than when it's unfolded. A unfolded Dahon looks, well,
    like a bike, but a folded one is essentially a pile of metal and rubber
    with sharp parts sticking out. But I guess it's true for all foldable
    bikes. To me an ideal bike would be smth I could jump off, spend 5 sec
    max filddling with, and rush down the escalator to catch the train.
    Repeat the same steps in reverse order when off the train. Doesn't
    quite work with my mntn and road bikes. Don't see how it can work with
    the Dahon. Since the handybike is so small, I thought It could be worth
    trying, but noone has it in stock here in SanFran. As for 6" wheels, I
    have skates wth 6" wheels (rollerskis, to be precise), and they can
    handle all kinds of bad pavement.
     
  5. [email protected] wrote:
    > See, when folded the Dahon is not significantly more convenient to
    > carry around than when it's unfolded. A unfolded Dahon looks, well,
    > like a bike, but a folded one is essentially a pile of metal and rubber
    > with sharp parts sticking out. But I guess it's true for all foldable
    > bikes. To me an ideal bike would be smth I could jump off, spend 5 sec
    > max filddling with, and rush down the escalator to catch the train.
    > Repeat the same steps in reverse order when off the train. Doesn't
    > quite work with my mntn and road bikes. Don't see how it can work with
    > the Dahon. Since the handybike is so small, I thought It could be worth
    > trying, but noone has it in stock here in SanFran. As for 6" wheels, I
    > have skates wth 6" wheels (rollerskis, to be precise), and they can
    > handle all kinds of bad pavement.
    >

    Skateboard?
     
  6. [email protected] wrote:
    > Has anyone tried this thing?
    > www.handybike.com


    I've never even heard of it, but it looks unwieldy to me. The seat
    appears to be set very far back from the crankset, which might affect
    pedaling and comfort badly. Also, your center of gravity would be
    almost vertically above the rear wheel. I expect that would make it
    bad handling in general, and prone to wheelies at the slightest uphill
    and/or acceleration.

    And I'll join those who judge the wheels to be far too small.

    >
    > I am looking for a light foldable bike to take on public transport and
    > cycle 10 blocks to and from work. Regular bikes are too cumbersome to
    > carry around. I tried a Dahon Presto, it might be OK, but it's still
    > heavy (18 lbs, like my racing bike) and it takes forever to fold and
    > unfold (and to adjust again and again).


    The Handybike is barely lighter than the Presto, and it's very unlikely
    to ride anywhere near as well. I know you're putting a higher priority
    on folding, but any bike needs to be _somewhat_ rideable.

    Folding a Dahon shouldn't take more than two minutes, especially with
    practice. You should mark the position of anything adjustable (for
    example, seatpost) so you don't have to do trial and error. Slide it
    to the mark, clamp it and ride.

    - Frank Krygowski
     
  7. yeah. I've never ridden one though, and I am too old to learn.
     
  8. Leo Lichtman

    Leo Lichtman Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote: (clip) Folding a Dahon shouldn't take more than
    two minutes, especially with practice. You should mark the position of
    anything adjustable (for example, seatpost) (clip)
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    I ride a Dahon some, and I can back up what Frank K. says. After you've
    folded and unfolded a Dahon a few times, the little snags and glitches seem
    to disappear. It actually takes me longer to slide the carrying bag onto
    the folded bike than folding it.

    The seatpost is the ONLY adjustment, and even if you don't mark it (I
    haven't) you get to know how high it should be in relation to your belly
    button (or whatever.)
     
  9. Rich

    Rich Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > yeah. I've never ridden one though, and I am too old to learn.


    Only if you believe that.
     
  10. SMS

    SMS Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > See, when folded the Dahon is not significantly more convenient to
    > carry around than when it's unfolded. A unfolded Dahon looks, well,
    > like a bike, but a folded one is essentially a pile of metal and rubber
    > with sharp parts sticking out. But I guess it's true for all foldable
    > bikes. To me an ideal bike would be smth I could jump off, spend 5 sec
    > max filddling with, and rush down the escalator to catch the train.
    > Repeat the same steps in reverse order when off the train. Doesn't
    > quite work with my mntn and road bikes. Don't see how it can work with
    > the Dahon. Since the handybike is so small, I thought It could be worth
    > trying, but noone has it in stock here in SanFran. As for 6" wheels, I
    > have skates wth 6" wheels (rollerskis, to be precise), and they can
    > handle all kinds of bad pavement.


    A Brompton can be folded in less than ten seconds, and folds very
    compactly with the chain on the inside. But even the lightest Brompton
    is close to 10 kg, and is quite expensive.
     
  11. SMS

    SMS Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Has anyone tried this thing?
    > www.handybike.com
    >
    > I am looking for a light foldable bike to take on public transport and
    > cycle 10 blocks to and from work. Regular bikes are too cumbersome to
    > carry around. I tried a Dahon Presto, it might be OK, but it's still
    > heavy (18 lbs, like my racing bike) and it takes forever to fold and
    > unfold (and to adjust again and again).


    Remember that the weight generally goes up as the wheel size goes down
    because it means more frame, seatpost, and stem, and less wheel.

    I.e., the Dahon Helios SL is only 16.7 pounds but uses 20" wheels, while
    the Dahon Presto Lite uses 16" wheels and weighs 18.7 pounds.
     
  12. Andy Gee

    Andy Gee Guest

    [email protected] wrote in news:1138577958.276205.89380
    @z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com:

    > Has anyone tried this thing?
    > www.handybike.com
    >
    > I am looking for a light foldable bike to take on public transport and
    > cycle 10 blocks to and from work. Regular bikes are too cumbersome to
    > carry around. I tried a Dahon Presto, it might be OK, but it's still
    > heavy (18 lbs, like my racing bike) and it takes forever to fold and
    > unfold (and to adjust again and again).
    >


    I have one of these hanging on my wall. If you can find someone still
    selling parts, please order me a rear wheel.

    This is in theory a fabulous short-haul ride -- I've folded it up and
    taken it to and from airports and on the plane. Has a custom bag, too.
    But the first generation had manufacturing that didn't meet the goal of the
    engineering. The rear rim would dvelop internal flaws and puncture tubes
    from the inside; the fold-up mechanism would stick, and the scooter-style
    hubs did _not_ wheel freely.


    Never the less, I'd like to get mine back in riding shape.

    --ag
     
  13. Collin O'Neill wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    > > yeah. I've never ridden one though, and I am too old to learn.
    > >

    > Fold-up scooter?
    >
    > http://www.sidewalkerusa.com/micro_photos.htm


    [Goes into other room, measures time to dismount and fold Micro, then
    reverses operation.]

    It took me approximately 15 seconds each way, but with practice I could
    get it down to near 10 seconds.

    However, the Micro is still a fairly large package when folded.

    --
    Tom Sherman - Fox River Valley
     
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