FOOCKING MIDGES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Gary, Jun 21, 2003.

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  1. Gary

    Gary Guest

    Just back from a camping / cycling weekend in Aberfoyle - let me tell you, the Midges were an
    absolute nightmare.

    We pitched tent in a fairly large clearance in a field around 7:30pm - average weather. After
    pitching the tent, we sat in it for maybe 30 minutes and suddenly started to hear what sounded like
    gentle rain. Opened the front door and I am not exaggerating when I say around 2000 midges had
    gathered at the door. We got out the tent as quickly as possible, probably swallowing 30 of the
    little shites as we ran for cover. After getting a thick hooded top on and tying the hood tight
    around my head, leaving only space for my eyes, I dismantled the tent and stuck it in the car -
    managed to find a proper camp site, took the highest point in a good breeze and the midges were no
    were to be seen.

    Next day, we started our cycle and managed to stay Midge free until Loch Katrine. Around two mile
    around Loch Katrine I started to swallow hordes of the little buggurs and every part of my body was
    being bitten! My eyes were also filling with Midge and I was infuriated, cursing terribly at the
    annoying little shits. Around 5 mile of the Loch Katrine section was swarming with Midge and there
    was no real way of escape, just cycled as fast as I could and looked forward to the open road.

    After Loch Katrine the Midges seemed to fade away, although I now look like I have the worst case of
    measles you have ever seen. I finished the cycle around 5:30 pm and I am still itching like mad, I
    must say it has put a total damper on an otherwise perfect weekend.

    If you are planning cycling in the Trossachs soon, be warned - these midge are on steroids.

    Gary.
     
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  2. David Nutter

    David Nutter Guest

    Gary <[email protected]> said:
    > Just back from a camping / cycling weekend in Aberfoyle - let me tell you, the Midges were an
    > absolute nightmare.

    'Tis the season for members of Clan Clegg I see :)

    There's an insect repellent that you only seem to be able to get in Scotland called Shoo! which,
    despite being an sinister bright blue colour and burning like fire if you get it on any sensitive
    skin, works very well against midges. Much better than the Jungle Formula stuff anyway.

    Thanks to Shoo! we all survived 2 weeks of canoeing on Loch Awe; though at one point our trangias
    started to go wrong due to the number of charred midge carcasses floating in the meths burner!

    Regards,

    -david
     
  3. Taywood

    Taywood Guest

    > If you are planning cycling in the Trossachs soon, be warned - these
    midge
    > are on steroids.

    Not much fun !! You've got our sympathy. But dont blame the midges, thats their home. The female
    needs blood, your blood, in order to reproduce, and what could me more natural than that. Mike
     
  4. Niv

    Niv Guest

    Apparently, & I don't intend to find out myself 'cos I've experienced the Scottish ones, Scots
    midges are quite small compared to Scandinavian ones. The further north, the bigger they come!

    Sounds like a B horror movie scenario. Niv. "Gary" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]...
    > Just back from a camping / cycling weekend in Aberfoyle - let me tell you, the Midges were an
    > absolute nightmare.
    >
    > We pitched tent in a fairly large clearance in a field around 7:30pm - average weather. After
    > pitching the tent, we sat in it for maybe 30
    minutes
    > and suddenly started to hear what sounded like gentle rain. Opened the front door and I am not
    > exaggerating when I say around 2000 midges had gathered at the door. We got out the tent as
    > quickly as possible,
    probably
    > swallowing 30 of the little shites as we ran for cover. After getting a thick hooded top on and
    > tying the hood tight around my head, leaving only space for my eyes, I dismantled the tent and
    > stuck it in the car - managed to find a proper camp site, took the highest point in a good
    > breeze and
    the
    > midges were no were to be seen.
    >
    > Next day, we started our cycle and managed to stay Midge free until Loch Katrine. Around two mile
    > around Loch Katrine I started to swallow hordes
    of
    > the little buggurs and every part of my body was being bitten! My eyes
    were
    > also filling with Midge and I was infuriated, cursing terribly at the annoying little shits.
    > Around 5 mile of the Loch Katrine section was swarming with Midge and there was no real way of
    > escape, just cycled as
    fast
    > as I could and looked forward to the open road.
    >
    > After Loch Katrine the Midges seemed to fade away, although I now look
    like
    > I have the worst case of measles you have ever seen. I finished the cycle around 5:30 pm and I am
    > still itching like mad, I must say it has put a total damper on an otherwise perfect weekend.
    >
    > If you are planning cycling in the Trossachs soon, be warned - these midge are on steroids.
    >
    > Gary.
     
  5. Taywood

    Taywood Guest

    "Niv" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Apparently, & I don't intend to find out myself 'cos I've experienced
    the
    > Scottish ones, Scots midges are quite small compared to Scandinavian
    ones.
    > The further north, the bigger they come!

    Of the several varieties of midge in the UK only the Scottish midge bites to breed. Mike
     
  6. The Mark

    The Mark Guest

    Taywood wrote:
    >> If you are planning cycling in the Trossachs soon, be warned - these midge are on steroids.
    >
    > Not much fun !! You've got our sympathy. But dont blame the midges, thats their home.

    The little b****rs have set up home in my garden, I had to go into the garage to work on the bike.

    > The female needs blood, your blood, in order to reproduce, and what could me more natural than
    > that. Mike

    I think I read somewhere that the female can breed once without sucking blood and can then breed
    again after sucking blood.
    --
    Mark

    I'm getting something special built for me.
     
  7. The Mark

    The Mark Guest

    Niv wrote:
    > Apparently, & I don't intend to find out myself 'cos I've experienced the Scottish ones, Scots
    > midges are quite small compared to Scandinavian ones. The further north, the bigger they come!
    >
    Except the ones in Iceland are so small you can hardly see the individuals you can only see them in
    a swarm. I don't know if they bite though.
    --
    Mark

    I'm getting something special built for me.
     
  8. The Mark

    The Mark Guest

    Taywood wrote:
    > "Niv" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> Apparently, & I don't intend to find out myself 'cos I've experienced the Scottish ones, Scots
    >> midges are quite small compared to Scandinavian ones. The further north, the bigger they come!
    >
    > Of the several varieties of midge in the UK only the Scottish midge bites to breed. Mike

    And there is more than one variety, see
    http://www.scotweb.co.uk/environment/midges/scottishmidge.html
    --
    Mark

    I'm getting something special built for me.
     
  9. Jim Price

    Jim Price Guest

    Taywood wrote:

    > Of the several varieties of midge in the UK only the Scottish midge bites to breed.

    Which I suppose makes the thread title more apt...

    --
    Jim Price

    http://www.jimprice.dsl.pipex.com

    Conscientious objection is hard work in an economic war.

    Aye!.
     
  10. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    "Gary" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Around 5 mile of the Loch Katrine section was swarming with Midge and there was no real way of
    > escape, just cycled as fast as I could and looked forward to the open road.
    >

    About 10 years ago I did a sponsored cycle ride from Stirling that went round Loch Katrine. I have
    *never* been so bitten in my entire life (and I spend around half my weekends up in the highlands
    somewhere). I'm no wimp (honest!) but I was almost in tears by the end of it from the sheer
    frustration and irritation.

    By the way, thanks, you've made me start feeling itchy now! :-(

    Have (itchy) fun!

    Graeme
     
  11. Andy P

    Andy P Guest

    "Graeme" <[email protected]> wrote

    > About 10 years ago I did a sponsored cycle ride from Stirling that went round Loch Katrine. I have
    > *never* been so bitten in my entire life (and I spend around half my weekends up in the highlands
    > somewhere). I'm no wimp (honest!) but I was almost in tears by the end of it from the sheer
    > frustration and irritation.

    I don't think I ever get actually bitten much by midges. If I do I certainly don't notice it and I
    never come up in red blotches or anything which is a bit odd because I used to react quite badly to
    gnat bites when I used to go fishing in the evenings as a kid. I just hate them crawling all over my
    face and getting in my eyes when they're really swarming.
     
  12. Call Me Bob

    Call Me Bob Guest

    On Sun, 22 Jun 2003 10:19:36 +0100, "Niv" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Apparently, & I don't intend to find out myself 'cos I've experienced the Scottish ones, Scots
    >midges are quite small compared to Scandinavian ones. The further north, the bigger they come!

    I couldn't comment on Scandinavian ones, but Swiss ones are bloody evil! They made a feast of me
    last week, but then it was my own fault entirely. The evening before I'd been smugly telling a
    bitten colleague how insects never snack on me no matter where I am. That night they just about
    chewed off my left arm.

    Bob
    --
    Mail address is spam trapped To reply by email remove the beverage
     
  13. Paul Kelly

    Paul Kelly Guest

    In news:[email protected], Call me Bob <[email protected]> typed:
    > On Sun, 22 Jun 2003 10:19:36 +0100, "Niv" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Apparently, & I don't intend to find out myself 'cos I've experienced the Scottish ones, Scots
    >> midges are quite small compared to Scandinavian ones. The further north, the bigger they come!
    >
    > I couldn't comment on Scandinavian ones, but Swiss ones are bloody evil! They made a feast of me
    > last week, but then it was my own fault entirely. The evening before I'd been smugly telling a
    > bitten colleague how insects never snack on me no matter where I am. That night they just about
    > chewed off my left arm.

    I think you will find that they do snack off you, but you do not respond - until now that is!

    pk
     
  14. Rj Webb

    Rj Webb Guest

    On Sun, 22 Jun 2003 09:29:36 +0100, "Taywood" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >> If you are planning cycling in the Trossachs soon, be warned - these
    >midge
    >> are on steroids.
    >
    >Not much fun !! You've got our sympathy. But dont blame the midges, thats their home. The female
    >needs blood, your blood, in order to reproduce, and what could me more natural than that. Mike

    But why are the numbers increasing so fast, and the range extending. Buttermere this last weekend
    was like Glencoe.

    When I lived in Scotland 20 years ago, June was often the last month of peace, before the little
    sods closed the place down until the blessed frosts of Autumn.

    Now May can be hell

    Richard Webb
     
  15. Rj Webb

    Rj Webb Guest

    >Of the several varieties of midge in Britain only the Scottish midge bites to breed. Mike
    >

    So why do the English sods bite? Malice.

    There are several biters in Scotland, the commonest, C. impunctatus, or as I call it the Addidas
    Midge is the usual culprit and is sadly all to prevalent in other parts of the island.

    Richard Webb
     
  16. Graeme Dods

    Graeme Dods Guest

    "Jerry" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > http://www.shoo.org/ShooHome.html

    Good stuff apparently. I've always thought it funny how they boast about being DEET free though.
    They use DiMP (Dimethyl Pthalate) which, like DEET (Diethyl Toluamide), was originally meant as an
    industrial plasticiser. This means it comes with similar risks, i.e. your lovely new
    waterproofs/rucsac/watch strap/etc. will weaken to the point of uselessness if you're not careful.

    I prefer the non-DEET/DiMP repellants. They usually smell nicer (to me, not the beasties).

    Have (bite free) fun!

    Graeme
     
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