Food around the country

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Scott, Mar 11, 2004.

  1. Scott

    Scott Guest

    I have it in mind to take a cross-country drive this summer--
    taking about two months or so to do it. I plan to camp most
    nights, if possible, motels other nights (especially when
    in/near a city).

    I was wondering if anyone could suggest places to stop
    (towns, routes, or specific eateries) to keep in mind--i.e.,
    particularly special places for food.

    My itinerary is up in the air to some extent, but I have a
    vague plan to, starting in New York, go west through PA, to
    Ohio, up through Michigan and across the Mackinaw Bridge,
    through Wisconsin, Minnesota,
    S. Dakota, Wyoming, Montana, that bit of Idaho, to
    Washington, then south through Oregon and into
    California. Stopping in San Francisco for a few days,
    then east through Nevada, Utah, Colorado (Colorado
    Springs and environs is a couple-days stop for me). I'm
    even less certain of where to go then... I suppose New
    Orleans would be interesting, then east/north from there.

    Any suggestions? I'm still figuring out what to see, so my
    path is subject to much change.

    I'm not interested in fancy places, and my focus isn't on a
    place that simply makes a very good hamburger (unless
    there's something to set it apart). I'd like places that,
    for example (1) have food you can't get elsewhere (either at
    all, or with nearly the same quality), and (2) serve well as
    a story to tell people--"I went to this interesting place
    outside of this town ...."

    I'll probably do a lot of cooking on my camp stove, so even
    places that sell things to later cook in a pot or cast-iron
    pan over a Coleman Dual-Fuel stove would be welcome (I'm
    bringing minimal food preparation gear, so I plan to keep
    such cooking simple). I haven't worked out the issue of
    refrigeration, yet.

    Any suggestions?

    --
    to respond, change "spamless.invalid" with "optonline.net"
    please mail OT responses only
     
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  2. Kilikini

    Kilikini Guest

    "Scott" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have it in mind to take a cross-country drive this summer--
    > taking about two months or so to do it. I plan to camp
    > most nights, if possible, motels other nights (especially
    > when in/near a city).
    >
    > I was wondering if anyone could suggest places to stop
    > (towns, routes, or specific eateries) to keep in mind--
    > i.e., particularly special places for food.
    >
    > My itinerary is up in the air to some extent, but I have a
    > vague plan to, starting in New York, go west through PA,
    > to Ohio, up through Michigan and across the Mackinaw
    > Bridge, through Wisconsin, Minnesota,
    > S. Dakota, Wyoming, Montana, that bit of Idaho, to
    > Washington, then south through Oregon and into
    > California. Stopping in San Francisco for a few days,
    > then east through Nevada, Utah, Colorado (Colorado
    > Springs and environs is a couple-days stop for me). I'm
    > even less certain of where to go then... I suppose New
    > Orleans would be interesting, then east/north from
    > there.
    >
    > Any suggestions?

    (snip)

    > Any suggestions?
    >
    > --
    > to respond, change "spamless.invalid" with "optonline.net"
    > please mail OT responses only

    Yes, if you go north in Wisconsin, hit Door County and go to
    a fishboil. Not only is the scenery up there beautiful, but
    many places do a fantastic fishboil that is to die for. No
    specific names of places, but camping grounds have them
    frequently. Perhaps someone else can give you specifics. In
    any case, it's an outdoor event due to the fact that it's
    done in a LARGE pot over a huge fire. What is it? Whitefish
    boiled with onions, potatoes, and corn, with lots of butter
    and seasonings. You usually get rolls and cherry pie also.
    It's so buttery and good (probably not good on cholesterol
    counts, but oh well). Door County is also *known* for its
    Cherry Pie - a must-have if you're passing through.

    kilikini
     
  3. On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 21:48:33 GMT, Scott <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I have it in mind to take a cross-country drive this summer--
    > taking about two months or so to do it. I plan to camp
    > most nights, if possible, motels other nights (especially
    > when in/near a city).
    >
    > I was wondering if anyone could suggest places to stop
    > (towns, routes, or specific eateries) to keep in mind--
    > i.e., particularly special places for food.
    [snip]

    If you haven't already checked it out,
    http://www.roadfood.com sounds like it might be a
    good starting place for you. Lots of reviews,
    organized by region, and the bonus is that they have
    pictures, too. Their forums also have a board where
    you can ask for specific recommendations along route
    or for cities if/when you figure out where your
    route will take you.

    Good luck, this sounds like it'll be an awesome trip!
    :)

    Ariane
     
  4. On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 21:48:33 GMT, Scott <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Wisconsin,

    You *gotta* do fried cheese curds, and buy FRESH cheese
    curds while in Wisconsin. It's just be wrong if you
    didn't. :)

    --
    Siobhan Perricone
    The actions taken by the New Hampshire Episcopalians are an affront to
    Christians everywhere. I am just thankful that the church's founder, Henry
    VIII, and his wife Catherine of Aragon, his wife Anne Boleyn, his wife Jane
    Seymour, his wife Anne of Cleves, his wife Catherine Howard and his wife
    Catherine Parr are no longer here to suffer through this assault on our
    "traditional Christian marriage."
    - Owen Keavney
     
  5. Cindy Fuller

    Cindy Fuller Guest

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Scott <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I have it in mind to take a cross-country drive this summer--
    > taking about two months or so to do it. I plan to camp
    > most nights, if possible, motels other nights (especially
    > when in/near a city).
    >
    > I was wondering if anyone could suggest places to stop
    > (towns, routes, or specific eateries) to keep in mind--
    > i.e., particularly special places for food.
    >
    > My itinerary is up in the air to some extent, but I have a
    > vague plan to, starting in New York, go west through PA,
    > to Ohio, up through Michigan and across the Mackinaw
    > Bridge, through Wisconsin, Minnesota,
    > S. Dakota, Wyoming, Montana, that bit of Idaho, to
    > Washington, then south through Oregon and into
    > California. Stopping in San Francisco for a few days,
    > then east through Nevada, Utah, Colorado (Colorado
    > Springs and environs is a couple-days stop for me). I'm
    > even less certain of where to go then... I suppose New
    > Orleans would be interesting, then east/north from
    > there.
    >
    > Any suggestions? I'm still figuring out what to see, so my
    > path is subject to much change.
    >
    > I'm not interested in fancy places, and my focus isn't on
    > a place that simply makes a very good hamburger (unless
    > there's something to set it apart). I'd like places that,
    > for example (1) have food you can't get elsewhere (either
    > at all, or with nearly the same quality), and (2) serve
    > well as a story to tell people--"I went to this
    > interesting place outside of this town ...."
    >
    > I'll probably do a lot of cooking on my camp stove, so
    > even places that sell things to later cook in a pot or cast-
    > iron pan over a Coleman Dual-Fuel stove would be welcome
    > (I'm bringing minimal food preparation gear, so I plan to
    > keep such cooking simple). I haven't worked out the issue
    > of refrigeration, yet.
    >
    > Any suggestions?

    It sounds as if you plan on taking I-90 to I-5, then east on
    I-80 from San Francisco. If you get anywhere near Glacier
    National Park in Montana (which is a far piece from I-90),
    you need to stop at the Park Cafe in St. Mary. It's at the
    eastern end of the Going-to-the-Sun Road (the main road
    through the park). They make good grub, but their true
    specialty is pies.

    When/if you come to Seattle, you must go to Pike Place
    Market. Go early in the morning to avoid the onslaught of
    turistas and cruise ship shoppers. Have breakfast at the
    Athenian Inn, or grab a baked goodie and some coffee and
    watch people, ferry boats, etc. in the park to the north of
    the market. On a nice day, you'll be able to see Mount
    Rainier from that park. You can also get provisions for the
    next couple of days on the road at the market.

    If you have problems with excessive heat and humidity in the
    summer, New Orleans is the last place you want to visit. It
    can be pretty oppressive, even in April or November. I hear
    tell the mosquitoes are the size of crows.

    Cindy

    --
    C.J. Fuller

    Delete the obvious to email me
     
  6. Sportkite1

    Sportkite1 Guest

    >From: Scott

    >I have it in mind to take a cross-country drive this summer--
    >taking about two months or so to do it. I plan to camp most
    >nights, if possible, motels other nights (especially when
    >in/near a city).
    >
    >I was wondering if anyone could suggest places to stop
    >(towns, routes, or specific eateries) to keep in mind--
    >i.e., particularly special places for food.
    >
    >My itinerary is up in the air to some extent, but I have a
    >vague plan to, starting in New York, go west through PA, to
    >Ohio, up through Michigan and across the Mackinaw Bridge,
    >through Wisconsin, Minnesota,
    >S. Dakota, Wyoming, Montana, that bit of Idaho, to
    > Washington, then south through Oregon and into
    > California. Stopping in San Francisco for a few days,
    > then east through Nevada, Utah, Colorado (Colorado
    > Springs and environs is a couple-days stop for me). I'm
    > even less certain of where to go then... I suppose New
    > Orleans would be interesting, then east/north from
    > there.

    >Any suggestions? I'm still figuring out what to see, so my
    >path is subject to much change.

    Sounds like an incredible journey. I'm envious. Before I get
    into the Oregon/California leg of your trip I'll jump ahead
    as to where I'd go after Colorado. I'd dip south to Taos and
    on to Santa Fe, NM. New Mexico is gorgeous, though hot hot
    hot in the Summer. But locally made SW cuisine is worth it.
    I'd trek quickly through Amarillo/OK City/Arkansas as fast
    as possible to get to Memphis, possibly moving through
    Tennesse with a planned stop in Nashville. But the ultimate
    end for me would be Asheville, NC. Check out those Smokies,
    man! Chase a few waterfalls, check out Chimney Rock, Lake
    Lure, Cherokee...it's all gorgeous. After that, hit the Blue
    Ridge Parkway and go north to Virginia.

    Back to Oregon. The coast is great, but Eugene is amazing.
    If you find yourself there around mid-July you have to go to
    the Country Faire. http://www.oregoncountryfair.org/It's an
    awesome blast to the past. Nothing like it in the world.
    Oregon micro beer is amazing. Check out McMennimins.

    >I'm not interested in fancy places, and my focus isn't on a
    >place that simply makes a very good hamburger (unless
    >there's something to set it apart). I'd like places that,
    >for example (1) have food you can't get elsewhere (either
    >at all, or with nearly the same quality), and (2) serve
    >well as a story to tell people--"I went to this interesting
    >place outside of this town ...."
    >
    >I'll probably do a lot of cooking on my camp stove, so even
    >places that sell things to later cook in a pot or cast-iron
    >pan over a Coleman Dual-Fuel stove would be welcome (I'm
    >bringing minimal food preparation gear, so I plan to keep
    >such cooking simple). I haven't worked out the issue of
    >refrigeration, yet.
    >
    >Any suggestions?

    Do some research once you have planned out your prospective
    route. Many towns have great farmers markets during the
    summer where you can hook up some great fresh produce, eat
    some great food and connect with the locals. Eat as you go!
    Another tip, check out your local health food stores. A good
    smoothie or freshly made vegie juice will keep you going
    healthfully during your trip. Good quality protein bars are
    a great snack, as are trail mixes.

    I'd invest in a supplement like Cell Food to add to your
    drinking water. Bottled water is the one thing you
    definitely want to have plenty of.

    While you are camping/cooking - have on hand some dried cups
    of "fill in the blank" mixes that only require hot water to
    reconstitute. Some of them are quite good. This is one of my
    favorite brands. http://www.rightfoods.com.

    Packets of instant oatmeal, aeseptic containers of rice milk
    and dried fruits will start off your morning. Shelf stable
    tuna is a high protein snack. If you are into tofu, Mori-Lu
    aeseptic is shelf stable, as are There are some pretty
    decent spice/dehydrated vegie mixes that can be combined
    with it for a good stirfry for dinner. Keep a bottle of
    olive oil on hand.

    As for dining out: Foodie musts in Oregon: Fresh Oregon
    Produce wherever you can. Spotted prawns right off the boats
    in Arcadia. Wild Salmon. Mushrooms. Handcrafted Beer!

    Foodie musts in San Francisco Dim Sum in Chinatown - don't
    do sit down, hit the bakeries for to-go. Mexican in the
    Mission for amazing burritoes and for sentimental reasons,
    Tommy's Joynt. http://www.tommysjoynt.com/

    One more thing. Keep us posted about your trip. You never
    know who might lend you a place to crash and a hot shower
    amongst this wild and crazy rfc's.

    Ellen
     
  7. Tracey

    Tracey Guest

    You might find some interesting information at
    www.roadfood.com

    "Scott" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    ge1.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
    > I have it in mind to take a cross-country drive this summer--
    > taking about two months or so to do it. I plan to camp
    > most nights, if possible, motels other nights (especially
    > when in/near a city).
    >
    > I was wondering if anyone could suggest places to stop
    > (towns, routes, or specific eateries) to keep in mind--
    > i.e., particularly special places for food.
    >
    > My itinerary is up in the air to some extent, but I have a
    > vague plan to, starting in New York, go west through PA,
    > to Ohio, up through Michigan and across the Mackinaw
    > Bridge, through Wisconsin, Minnesota,
    > S. Dakota, Wyoming, Montana, that bit of Idaho, to
    > Washington, then south through Oregon and into
    > California. Stopping in San Francisco for a few days,
    > then east through Nevada, Utah, Colorado (Colorado
    > Springs and environs is a couple-days stop for me). I'm
    > even less certain of where to go then... I suppose New
    > Orleans would be interesting, then east/north from
    > there.
    >
    > Any suggestions? I'm still figuring out what to see, so my
    > path is subject to much change.
    >
    > I'm not interested in fancy places, and my focus isn't on
    > a place that simply makes a very good hamburger (unless
    > there's something to set it apart). I'd like places that,
    > for example (1) have food you can't get elsewhere (either
    > at all, or with nearly the same quality), and (2) serve
    > well as a story to tell people--"I went to this
    > interesting place outside of this town ...."
    >
    > I'll probably do a lot of cooking on my camp stove, so
    > even places that sell things to later cook in a pot or cast-
    > iron pan over a Coleman Dual-Fuel stove would be welcome
    > (I'm bringing minimal food preparation gear, so I plan to
    > keep such cooking simple). I haven't worked out the issue
    > of refrigeration, yet.
    >
    > Any suggestions?
    >
    > --
    > to respond, change "spamless.invalid" with "optonline.net"
    > please mail OT responses only
     
  8. Marecat

    Marecat Guest

    On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 21:48:33 GMT, Scott <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I have it in mind to take a cross-country drive this summer--
    >taking about two months or so to do it. I plan to camp most
    >nights, if possible, motels other nights (especially when
    >in/near a city).
    >
    >I was wondering if anyone could suggest places to stop
    >(towns, routes, or specific eateries) to keep in mind--
    >i.e., particularly special places for food.
    >
    >My itinerary is up in the air to some extent, but I have a
    >vague plan to, starting in New York, go west through PA, to
    >Ohio, up through Michigan and across the Mackinaw Bridge,
    >through Wisconsin, Minnesota,
    >S. Dakota, Wyoming, Montana, that bit of Idaho, to
    > Washington, then south through Oregon and into
    > California. Stopping in San Francisco for a few days,
    > then east through Nevada, Utah, Colorado (Colorado
    > Springs and environs is a couple-days stop for me). I'm
    > even less certain of where to go then... I suppose New
    > Orleans would be interesting, then east/north from
    > there.
    >
    >Any suggestions? I'm still figuring out what to see, so my
    >path is subject to much change.

    Sounds like a wonderful trip!

    Add Texas to your list of places to visit. Very interesting
    and diverse state (very big state, too, so allow plenty of
    traveling time). Also, three cities in TX are among the 10
    largest cities in the U.S. (Houston--4th largest, Dallas--
    8th largest, and San Antonio--9th largest).

    >I'm not interested in fancy places, and my focus isn't on a
    >place that simply makes a very good hamburger (unless
    >there's something to set it apart). I'd like places that,
    >for example (1) have food you can't get elsewhere (either
    >at all, or with nearly the same quality), and (2) serve
    >well as a story to tell people--"I went to this interesting
    >place outside of this town ...."

    *Many* cities and towns in Texas have places that would meet
    both of those criteria. The food in TX is truly unique and
    much of it (at least with the same quality) cannot be found
    in other parts of the U.S.
     
  9. Saerah

    Saerah Guest

    Scott wrote in message ...
    >I have it in mind to take a cross-country drive this summer--
    >taking about two months or so to do it. I plan to camp most
    >nights, if possible, motels other nights (especially when
    >in/near a city).
    >
    >I was wondering if anyone could suggest places to stop
    >(towns, routes, or specific eateries) to keep in mind--
    >i.e., particularly special places for food.
    >
    >My itinerary is up in the air to some extent, but I have a
    >vague plan to, starting in New York, go west through PA, to
    >Ohio, up through Michigan and across the Mackinaw Bridge,

    the UP is gorgeous! (as are northern wisconsin and
    minnesota). ive spent some time nearly every summer since i
    was 2 there. my mother told me about a nice campground near
    naubinway ( i think, ill have to ask her tomorrow) that is
    on the lake. there is a state forest campground near garden
    as well, that is nice, but the beach has deteriorated
    somewhat since i was a kid. there are some decent hiking
    trails there, provided the tide is low. (otherwise, you have
    to double back :> ) somewhere between manistique and rapid
    river (closer to rapid river, i believe) there is an area of
    forest that burned down about 10 years ago or so, making
    room for *many* wild blueberries. great for pancakes and
    muffins (if you have that coleman camp oven) or just out of
    hand. the topgraphy of the UP lends to many waterfalls-
    there are nearly 200! the lake of the clouds is a very nice
    place to visit (in porcupine mountains state rec area, near
    ontanogan), especially in the morning when its more misty.
    da yoopers' tourist trap (Us 41 west of ishepeming) is cute,
    if its on your way, and it should be, because the pictured
    rocks national lakeshore (west of munising, along lake
    superior) is beautiful. west of munising is a town called
    christmas, which has alot of corny street signs and a huge
    santa ( at least 40 feet high) by the post office. big
    eric's bridge campground is also nice (20 miles outside of
    l'anse), at leastaccording to my mom. i don't remember :>

    >through Wisconsin, Minnesota,
    >S. Dakota, Wyoming, Montana, that bit of Idaho, to
    > Washington, then south through Oregon and into
    > California. Stopping in San Francisco for a few days,
    > then east through Nevada, Utah, Colorado (Colorado
    > Springs and environs is a couple-days stop for me). I'm
    > even less certain of where to go then... I suppose New
    > Orleans would be interesting, then east/north from
    > there.
    >
    >Any suggestions? I'm still figuring out what to see, so my
    >path is subject to much change.
    >
    >I'm not interested in fancy places, and my focus isn't on a
    >place that simply makes a very good hamburger (unless
    >there's something to set it apart). I'd like places that,
    >for example (1) have food you can't get elsewhere (either
    >at all, or with nearly the same quality), and (2) serve
    >well as a story to tell people--"I went to this interesting
    >place outside of this town ...."
    >
    >I'll probably do a lot of cooking on my camp stove, so even
    >places that sell things to later cook in a pot or cast-iron
    >pan over a Coleman Dual-Fuel stove would be welcome (I'm
    >bringing minimal food preparation gear, so I plan to keep
    >such cooking simple). I haven't worked out the issue of
    >refrigeration, yet.
    >

    for a long trip like this, pack the ice on top of the food
    in the cooler, and pack everything in watertight containers.
    it will keep things cooler. i would only travel with maybe
    meat and dairy, and condiments in the cooler, and buy
    produce roadside etc. as i needed it if this was me.

    >Any suggestions?
    >
    >--
    >to respond, change "spamless.invalid" with "optonline.net"
    >please mail OT responses only
     
  10. Louis Cohen

    Louis Cohen Guest

    Boston - for chowder, broiled scrod, and Indian pudding
    New York - a pastrami sandwich at Katz's Delicatessen, and
    of course lots of other stuff San Francisco - Dungeness
    crab, Chinese food, vegetarian at Greens or Millennium;
    grilled fish at the Tadich Grill Berkeley - whatever they
    are serving at Chez Panisse New Orleans - gumbo, oysters,
    crayfish, shrimp, muffaletta Kansas City - BBQ at Arthur
    Bryant's Texas - real fajitas in the Rio Grande valley;
    BBQ brisket Owensboro, Kentucky - BBQ mutton Santa Fe -
    chile verde, enchiladas - Note: The NM state question is
    "Red or Green?"

    Avoid all chains, of course. Ask local people where to find
    good local food.

    --
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------------
    ----
    Louis Cohen Living la vida loca at N37° 43' 7.9" W122° 8'
    42.8"

    "Scott" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    ge1.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
    > I have it in mind to take a cross-country drive this summer--
    > taking about two months or so to do it. I plan to camp
    > most nights, if possible, motels other nights (especially
    > when in/near a city).
    >
    > I was wondering if anyone could suggest places to stop
    > (towns, routes, or specific eateries) to keep in mind--
    > i.e., particularly special places for food.
    >
    > My itinerary is up in the air to some extent, but I have a
    > vague plan to, starting in New York, go west through PA,
    > to Ohio, up through Michigan and across the Mackinaw
    > Bridge, through Wisconsin, Minnesota,
    > S. Dakota, Wyoming, Montana, that bit of Idaho, to
    > Washington, then south through Oregon and into
    > California. Stopping in San Francisco for a few days,
    > then east through Nevada, Utah, Colorado (Colorado
    > Springs and environs is a couple-days stop for me). I'm
    > even less certain of where to go then... I suppose New
    > Orleans would be interesting, then east/north from
    > there.
    >
    > Any suggestions? I'm still figuring out what to see, so my
    > path is subject to much change.
    >
    > I'm not interested in fancy places, and my focus isn't on
    > a place that simply makes a very good hamburger (unless
    > there's something to set it apart). I'd like places that,
    > for example (1) have food you can't get elsewhere (either
    > at all, or with nearly the same quality), and (2) serve
    > well as a story to tell people--"I went to this
    > interesting place outside of this town ...."
    >
    > I'll probably do a lot of cooking on my camp stove, so
    > even places that sell things to later cook in a pot or cast-
    > iron pan over a Coleman Dual-Fuel stove would be welcome
    > (I'm bringing minimal food preparation gear, so I plan to
    > keep such cooking simple). I haven't worked out the issue
    > of refrigeration, yet.
    >
    > Any suggestions?
    >
    > --
    > to respond, change "spamless.invalid" with "optonline.net"
    > please mail OT responses only
     
  11. In article <cjfullerSPAMORAMA-
    [email protected]>,

    > If you have problems with excessive heat and humidity in
    > the summer, New Orleans is the last place you want to
    > visit. It can be pretty oppressive, even in April or
    > November. I hear tell the mosquitoes are the size of
    > crows. Cindy

    The ones in our Boundary Waters area have to file flight
    plans. FAA regs.
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> updated 3-8-04.
    Rec.food.cooking's Preserved Fruit Administrator (I've got
    the button to prove it!) "The only difference between a rut
    and a grave is the depth of the hole."
     
  12. Sportkite1

    Sportkite1 Guest

    >From: "Louis Cohen"

    >San Francisco - Dungeness crab, Chinese food, vegetarian at
    >Greens or Millennium; grilled fish at the Tadich Grill
    >Berkeley - whatever they are serving at Chez Panisse

    Greens, Milennium and Chez Panisse are some seriously pricey
    restaurants.

    Ellen
     
  13. Sportkite1

    Sportkite1 Guest

    >From: "Louis Cohen"

    >San Francisco - Dungeness crab, Chinese food, vegetarian at
    >Greens or Millennium; grilled fish at the Tadich Grill
    >Berkeley - whatever they are serving at Chez Panisse

    Greens, Milennium and Chez Panisse are some seriously pricey
    restaurants.

    Ellen
     
  14. In article
    <[email protected]>, Scott
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I have it in mind to take a cross-country drive this summer--
    > taking about two months or so to do it. I plan to camp
    > most nights, if possible, motels other nights (especially
    > when in/near a city).
    >
    > I was wondering if anyone could suggest places to stop
    > (towns, routes, or specific eateries) to keep in mind--
    > i.e., particularly special places for food.
    >
    > My itinerary is up in the air to some extent, but I have a
    > vague plan to, starting in New York, go west through PA,
    > to Ohio, up through Michigan and across the Mackinaw
    > Bridge, through Wisconsin, Minnesota,

    You'll let me know when, right?

    > serve well as a story to tell people--"I went to this
    > interesting place outside of this town ...."

    On our honeymoon we got sidetracked and wound up with an
    overnight stay in Sioux Falls, SD. We ate at the Tea
    Steakhouse, Tea, South Dakota. The steaks were hanging over
    the edge of the plates. It was out of town and a great
    place. We played cribbage in the bar until a table was
    ready. Maybe they'd sell you a raw steak. It's been 38
    years; I don't know what it's like now or even if it IS now.

    < http://www.tonydean.com/equip.html?sectionid=525>

    <http://www.henrysd.com/February%2017th%20Henry%20News%2020-
    03.htm> Don't miss the above link. :)

    > I'll probably do a lot of cooking on my camp stove, so
    > even places that sell things to later cook in a pot or cast-
    > iron pan over a Coleman Dual-Fuel stove would be welcome
    > (I'm bringing minimal food preparation gear, so I plan to
    > keep such cooking simple). I haven't worked out the issue
    > of refrigeration, yet.
    >
    > Any suggestions?
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> updated 3-8-04.
    Rec.food.cooking's Preserved Fruit Administrator (I've got
    the button to prove it!) "The only difference between a rut
    and a grave is the depth of the hole."
     
  15. In article
    <[email protected]>, Scott
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I have it in mind to take a cross-country drive this summer--
    > taking about two months or so to do it. I plan to camp
    > most nights, if possible, motels other nights (especially
    > when in/near a city).
    >
    > I was wondering if anyone could suggest places to stop
    > (towns, routes, or specific eateries) to keep in mind--
    > i.e., particularly special places for food.
    >
    > My itinerary is up in the air to some extent, but I have a
    > vague plan to, starting in New York, go west through PA,
    > to Ohio, up through Michigan and across the Mackinaw
    > Bridge, through Wisconsin, Minnesota,

    You'll let me know when, right?

    > serve well as a story to tell people--"I went to this
    > interesting place outside of this town ...."

    On our honeymoon we got sidetracked and wound up with an
    overnight stay in Sioux Falls, SD. We ate at the Tea
    Steakhouse, Tea, South Dakota. The steaks were hanging over
    the edge of the plates. It was out of town and a great
    place. We played cribbage in the bar until a table was
    ready. Maybe they'd sell you a raw steak. It's been 38
    years; I don't know what it's like now or even if it IS now.

    < http://www.tonydean.com/equip.html?sectionid=525>

    <http://www.henrysd.com/February%2017th%20Henry%20News%2020-
    03.htm> Don't miss the above link. :)

    > I'll probably do a lot of cooking on my camp stove, so
    > even places that sell things to later cook in a pot or cast-
    > iron pan over a Coleman Dual-Fuel stove would be welcome
    > (I'm bringing minimal food preparation gear, so I plan to
    > keep such cooking simple). I haven't worked out the issue
    > of refrigeration, yet.
    >
    > Any suggestions?
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> updated 3-8-04.
    Rec.food.cooking's Preserved Fruit Administrator (I've got
    the button to prove it!) "The only difference between a rut
    and a grave is the depth of the hole."
     
  16. Royal

    Royal Guest

    On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 21:48:33 GMT, Scott <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I have it in mind to take a cross-country drive this summer--
    >taking about two months or so to do it. I plan to camp most
    >nights, if possible, motels other nights (especially when
    >in/near a city).
    >
    >I was wondering if anyone could suggest places to stop
    >(towns, routes, or specific eateries) to keep in mind--
    >i.e., particularly special places for food.
    >
    >My itinerary is up in the air to some extent, but I have a
    >vague plan to, starting in New York, go west through PA, to
    >Ohio, up through Michigan and across the Mackinaw Bridge,
    >through Wisconsin, Minnesota,
    >S. Dakota, Wyoming, Montana, that bit of Idaho, to
    > Washington, then south through Oregon and into
    > California. Stopping in San Francisco for a few days,
    > then east through Nevada, Utah, Colorado (Colorado
    > Springs and environs is a couple-days stop for me). I'm
    > even less certain of where to go then... I suppose New
    > Orleans would be interesting, then east/north from
    > there.
    >
    >Any suggestions? I'm still figuring out what to see, so my
    >path is subject to much change.
    >
    >I'm not interested in fancy places, and my focus isn't on a
    >place that simply makes a very good hamburger (unless
    >there's something to set it apart). I'd like places that,
    >for example (1) have food you can't get elsewhere (either
    >at all, or with nearly the same quality), and (2) serve
    >well as a story to tell people--"I went to this interesting
    >place outside of this town ...."
    >
    >I'll probably do a lot of cooking on my camp stove, so even
    >places that sell things to later cook in a pot or cast-iron
    >pan over a Coleman Dual-Fuel stove would be welcome (I'm
    >bringing minimal food preparation gear, so I plan to keep
    >such cooking simple). I haven't worked out the issue of
    >refrigeration, yet.
    >
    If you're going to be on I90 in the Butte, Missoula area,
    ask around for a good place to get a buffalo burger. We
    haven't been there in 10 years, but folks in that area knew
    how to cook a buffalo burger. I remember they fell apart in
    your mouth. You can get a buffalo burger here in Florida,
    but the taste and texture isn't even close to what we had in
    Montana so we leave 'em be down here.
     
  17. Royal

    Royal Guest

    On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 21:48:33 GMT, Scott <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I have it in mind to take a cross-country drive this summer--
    >taking about two months or so to do it. I plan to camp most
    >nights, if possible, motels other nights (especially when
    >in/near a city).
    >
    >I was wondering if anyone could suggest places to stop
    >(towns, routes, or specific eateries) to keep in mind--
    >i.e., particularly special places for food.
    >
    >My itinerary is up in the air to some extent, but I have a
    >vague plan to, starting in New York, go west through PA, to
    >Ohio, up through Michigan and across the Mackinaw Bridge,
    >through Wisconsin, Minnesota,
    >S. Dakota, Wyoming, Montana, that bit of Idaho, to
    > Washington, then south through Oregon and into
    > California. Stopping in San Francisco for a few days,
    > then east through Nevada, Utah, Colorado (Colorado
    > Springs and environs is a couple-days stop for me). I'm
    > even less certain of where to go then... I suppose New
    > Orleans would be interesting, then east/north from
    > there.
    >
    >Any suggestions? I'm still figuring out what to see, so my
    >path is subject to much change.
    >
    >I'm not interested in fancy places, and my focus isn't on a
    >place that simply makes a very good hamburger (unless
    >there's something to set it apart). I'd like places that,
    >for example (1) have food you can't get elsewhere (either
    >at all, or with nearly the same quality), and (2) serve
    >well as a story to tell people--"I went to this interesting
    >place outside of this town ...."
    >
    >I'll probably do a lot of cooking on my camp stove, so even
    >places that sell things to later cook in a pot or cast-iron
    >pan over a Coleman Dual-Fuel stove would be welcome (I'm
    >bringing minimal food preparation gear, so I plan to keep
    >such cooking simple). I haven't worked out the issue of
    >refrigeration, yet.
    >
    If you're going to be on I90 in the Butte, Missoula area,
    ask around for a good place to get a buffalo burger. We
    haven't been there in 10 years, but folks in that area knew
    how to cook a buffalo burger. I remember they fell apart in
    your mouth. You can get a buffalo burger here in Florida,
    but the taste and texture isn't even close to what we had in
    Montana so we leave 'em be down here.
     
  18. stan

    stan Guest

    Scott <[email protected]> wrote:

    > My itinerary is up in the air to some extent, but I have a
    > vague plan to, starting in New York, go west through PA,
    > to Ohio, up through Michigan and across the Mackinaw
    > Bridge, through Wisconsin, Minnesota,
    > S. Dakota, Wyoming, Montana, that bit of Idaho, to
    > Washington, then south through Oregon and into
    > California. Stopping in San Francisco for a few days,
    > then east through Nevada, Utah, Colorado (Colorado
    > Springs and environs is a couple-days stop for me). I'm
    > even less certain of where to go then... I suppose New
    > Orleans would be interesting, then east/north from
    > there.

    > Any suggestions? I'm still figuring out what to see, so my
    > path is subject to much change.

    There are some interesting food possibilities in Lancaster
    County, PA. If you're seriously hungry and not too concerned
    about budget, stop by for lunch or dinner at Miller's
    buffet, which is on Route 30.

    If you're going to visit northern Utah, treat yourself to
    lunch at the restaurant on Robert Redford's Sundance resort.
    The food and service there are superb.
     
  19. stan

    stan Guest

    Scott <[email protected]> wrote:

    > My itinerary is up in the air to some extent, but I have a
    > vague plan to, starting in New York, go west through PA,
    > to Ohio, up through Michigan and across the Mackinaw
    > Bridge, through Wisconsin, Minnesota,
    > S. Dakota, Wyoming, Montana, that bit of Idaho, to
    > Washington, then south through Oregon and into
    > California. Stopping in San Francisco for a few days,
    > then east through Nevada, Utah, Colorado (Colorado
    > Springs and environs is a couple-days stop for me). I'm
    > even less certain of where to go then... I suppose New
    > Orleans would be interesting, then east/north from
    > there.

    > Any suggestions? I'm still figuring out what to see, so my
    > path is subject to much change.

    There are some interesting food possibilities in Lancaster
    County, PA. If you're seriously hungry and not too concerned
    about budget, stop by for lunch or dinner at Miller's
    buffet, which is on Route 30.

    If you're going to visit northern Utah, treat yourself to
    lunch at the restaurant on Robert Redford's Sundance resort.
    The food and service there are superb.
     
  20. "Scott" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have it in mind to take a cross-country drive this summer--
    > taking about two months or so to do it. I plan to camp
    > most nights, if possible, motels other nights (especially
    > when in/near a city).
    >
    > I was wondering if anyone could suggest places to stop
    > (towns, routes, or specific eateries) to keep in mind--
    > i.e., particularly special places for food.
    >
    > My itinerary is up in the air to some extent, but I have a
    > vague plan to, starting in New York, go west through PA,
    > to Ohio, up through Michigan and across the Mackinaw
    > Bridge, through Wisconsin, Minnesota,
    > S. Dakota, Wyoming, Montana, that bit of Idaho, to
    > Washington, then south through Oregon and into
    > California. Stopping in San Francisco for a few days,
    > then east through Nevada, Utah, Colorado (Colorado
    > Springs and environs is a couple-days stop for me). I'm
    > even less certain of where to go then... I suppose New
    > Orleans would be interesting, then east/north from
    > there.
    >
    > Any suggestions? I'm still figuring out what to see, so my
    > path is subject to much change.

    I think you may find little variation in foods
    travelling the northern route west of Minnesota until
    you get to Seattle.

    When you head east from San Francisco, stop in Reno; it's a
    cool town, nothing like Vegas, with some good places to eat.
    After Reno, split off route 80 in Fallon and take US Route
    50 through Nevada and Utah; it's very scenic and there are
    some cool towns to stop in along the way. There's a nice
    barroom in Austin, NV. When you get into Utah, stop in
    Salina and go to Mom's; it's a diner with good home-cooked
    style food. Real mashed potatoes, you know the drill. After
    that you can catch I-70 which will take you into Colorado.
    Notable stops along the way are Grand Junction and Glenwood
    Springs. After that head into Denver, which is a treasure
    trove of restaurants. You should visit Boulder, too. East of
    Denver begins another void, where everything blurs together
    into a chicken fried steak/burger/gravy joint kinda thing,
    so you may want to head south and east from there.

    >
    > I'm not interested in fancy places, and my focus isn't on
    > a place that simply makes a very good hamburger (unless
    > there's something to set it apart). I'd like places that,
    > for example (1) have food you can't get elsewhere (either
    > at all, or with nearly the same quality), and (2) serve
    > well as a story to tell people--"I went to this
    > interesting place outside of this town ...."
    >
    > I'll probably do a lot of cooking on my camp stove, so
    > even places that sell things to later cook in a pot or cast-
    > iron pan over a Coleman Dual-Fuel stove would be welcome
    > (I'm bringing minimal food preparation gear, so I plan to
    > keep such cooking simple). I haven't worked out the issue
    > of refrigeration, yet.

    Those electric coolers that plug in to cigarette lighters or
    the 12V outlets in trucks work well. The food has to be cold
    when placed in them, but they'll keep them cold. I used one
    on a x-country trip in 99 with success. Even regular coolers
    are incredibly insulated these days so carrying food on a
    road trip is a lot easier than it used to be.

    >
    > Any suggestions?
    >
    > --
    > to respond, change "spamless.invalid" with "optonline.net"
    > please mail OT responses only
     
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