Food snob?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Henhouse, Mar 18, 2006.

  1. Henhouse

    Henhouse Guest

    A friend of mine accused me of being a food snob the other day. Why?
    Because I don't buy processed food, and never go to fast food eateries.
    I also always buy free range chicken and use either eggs from our own
    free range chooks, or bought duck eggs. I also buy organic foods from
    time to time, and try to buy seasonally and locally (being aware of food
    miles etc.) Does this really make me a food snob? I feel quite insulted,
    to tell you the truth - I don't dictate what others should eat, I just
    make the choices I prefer. I enjoy cooking and have the time to spend
    doing it, plus access to great local produce - I'm not sure why this
    could be seen as wrong in some way!

    My friend got quite heated about it all, and told me that if I'd got
    four kids and was working full time, I'd soon change my ways and opt for
    foods I could just stick in the microwave (not that she has the four
    kids etc., just the one 25yr old son). I'm not likely to ever find
    myself in that position, but I imagine that if I had children I'd be
    even more concerned about the foods they were eating than I am about my
    own. I could be wrong, of course!

    This is the same friend who is happy to come to dinner at my house, but
    who refuses to return the favour, as she is 'frightened' of cooking for
    me, as I am (allegedly) good at it - LOL! I'd be happy with beans on
    toast, if someone else had cooked it - but that's by the by.

    Anyway, I was wondering if anyone else here has suffered a similar
    accusation, and had any good arguments with which to refute it? Or
    perhaps you think my friend is right and I'm just too precious about the
    whole topic? Opinions welcomed!

    Jo
     
    Tags:


  2. Andy

    Andy Guest

    Henhouse wrote:

    > A friend of mine accused me of being a food snob the other day. Why?
    > Because I don't buy processed food, and never go to fast food eateries.
    > I also always buy free range chicken and use either eggs from our own
    > free range chooks, or bought duck eggs. I also buy organic foods from
    > time to time, and try to buy seasonally and locally (being aware of food
    > miles etc.) Does this really make me a food snob?



    Henhouse,

    Not at all. Some people have no concept of good nutrition. It's that
    simple.

    Ignore their ignorance. Imho,

    Andy
     
  3. -L.

    -L. Guest

    Henhouse wrote:
    > A friend of mine accused me of being a food snob the other day. Why?
    > Because I don't buy processed food, and never go to fast food eateries.
    > I also always buy free range chicken and use either eggs from our own
    > free range chooks, or bought duck eggs. I also buy organic foods from
    > time to time, and try to buy seasonally and locally (being aware of food
    > miles etc.) Does this really make me a food snob?


    By typical American standards, yes.

    I feel quite insulted,

    Don't. You are in good company. The way I see it, if people want to
    feed themselves and their kids with that schlock, it's merely natural
    selection at work...

    -L.
     
  4. kilikini

    kilikini Guest

    "Henhouse" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > A friend of mine accused me of being a food snob the other day. Why?
    > Because I don't buy processed food, and never go to fast food eateries.
    > I also always buy free range chicken and use either eggs from our own
    > free range chooks, or bought duck eggs. I also buy organic foods from
    > time to time, and try to buy seasonally and locally (being aware of food
    > miles etc.) Does this really make me a food snob? I feel quite insulted,
    > to tell you the truth - I don't dictate what others should eat, I just
    > make the choices I prefer. I enjoy cooking and have the time to spend
    > doing it, plus access to great local produce - I'm not sure why this
    > could be seen as wrong in some way!
    >
    > My friend got quite heated about it all, and told me that if I'd got
    > four kids and was working full time, I'd soon change my ways and opt for
    > foods I could just stick in the microwave (not that she has the four
    > kids etc., just the one 25yr old son). I'm not likely to ever find
    > myself in that position, but I imagine that if I had children I'd be
    > even more concerned about the foods they were eating than I am about my
    > own. I could be wrong, of course!
    >
    > This is the same friend who is happy to come to dinner at my house, but
    > who refuses to return the favour, as she is 'frightened' of cooking for
    > me, as I am (allegedly) good at it - LOL! I'd be happy with beans on
    > toast, if someone else had cooked it - but that's by the by.
    >
    > Anyway, I was wondering if anyone else here has suffered a similar
    > accusation, and had any good arguments with which to refute it? Or
    > perhaps you think my friend is right and I'm just too precious about the
    > whole topic? Opinions welcomed!
    >
    > Jo


    I have a friend like that, too, and she's always inviting me to come over
    for lunch. What does she have on hand on a regular basis? Frozen burritos,
    Kraft mac 'n cheese, packaged ramen noodles, pizza rolls, frozen jalepeno
    poppers, frozen breaded chicken tenders - stuff like that. That's what she
    feeds her family. I politely decline, but then I feel compelled to offer
    her something from *my* fridge, which she always accepts because she knows
    what I prepare is made with fresh ingredients and it still tastes good!

    I keep shaking my head at my friend because she complains about her weight
    and her daughters' weight (her 15 year old daughter is over 300 pounds!, her
    12 year old is about 170) and I just want to shake her! I keep trying to
    tell her that it's the kind of food she's buying that's causing the weight
    gain, she nods and says "she knows", but she claims that this is all her
    kids will eat. Personally, I think she's killing her family. Sad thing is,
    all this junk "food" is supported by the government. Yep, you got it, Food
    Stamps. Someone should supervise what kinds of foods people should be
    allowed to buy on government assistance.

    kili
     
  5. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    Henhouse wrote:

    > A friend of mine accused me of being a food snob the other day. Why?
    > Because I don't buy processed food, and never go to fast food eateries.
    > I also always buy free range chicken and use either eggs from our own
    > free range chooks, or bought duck eggs. I also buy organic foods from
    > time to time, and try to buy seasonally and locally (being aware of food
    > miles etc.) Does this really make me a food snob? I feel quite insulted,
    > to tell you the truth - I don't dictate what others should eat, I just
    > make the choices I prefer. I enjoy cooking and have the time to spend
    > doing it, plus access to great local produce - I'm not sure why this
    > could be seen as wrong in some way!


    No that doesn't make you a food snob. There's nothing wrong with
    enjoying quality food ingredients and good food. I guess "processed" in
    most cases mean the commercially pre-prepared meals, cakes, cookies, etc
    in a broad sense? I don't buy those but if you consider flours, dried
    pasta, sweeteners, cheeses, butter, yogurts and fish as being processed
    which they are, then I do buy these products. I avoid fast food places
    for the most part but can't claim to have never gone. Personally, aside
    of discussions on this ng, I don't get into heated arguments over food.
    I have my style and IMO it's no one else's business. If I were you, I
    would take her comments in stride, shrug them off and carry on. They
    really are a form of compliment rather than an insult :)

    >
    > My friend got quite heated about it all, and told me that if I'd got
    > four kids and was working full time, I'd soon change my ways and opt for
    > foods I could just stick in the microwave (not that she has the four
    > kids etc., just the one 25yr old son). I'm not likely to ever find
    > myself in that position, but I imagine that if I had children I'd be
    > even more concerned about the foods they were eating than I am about my
    > own. I could be wrong, of course!


    Well your friend is wrong. It sound to me like she is trying to justify
    her cooking style to you even though she doesn't need to and perhaps she
    is feeling a little guilty that she does do things the way you do. We
    raised kids and I'll tell you they didn't eat microwave meals or fast
    food except on very rare occasions. They also didn't eat white sugar,
    candy, hot dogs, or processed lunch meats. I have always had a couple
    of fruit baskets out - kitchen, family room - and they were allowed to
    help themselves without asking. I always had to still have cut up
    vegetables in the crisper and again they could help themselves. If it
    makes you a food snob by teaching your kids proper nutrition from day
    one, then I'm guilty.
    >
    > This is the same friend who is happy to come to dinner at my house, but
    > who refuses to return the favour, as she is 'frightened' of cooking for
    > me, as I am (allegedly) good at it - LOL! I'd be happy with beans on
    > toast, if someone else had cooked it - but that's by the by.
    >
    > Anyway, I was wondering if anyone else here has suffered a similar
    > accusation, and had any good arguments with which to refute it? Or
    > perhaps you think my friend is right and I'm just too precious about the
    > whole topic? Opinions welcomed!


    I used to get a lot of comments from inlaws regarding the fact I
    wouldn't let the kids eat certain things. As if they would be
    maladjusted because they didn't eat candy! Seesh! I got to the point
    it would just go in one ear and out the other. On the flip side these
    very same people give me high praises for my canning. My canning shelf
    is in the kitchen and makes an impressive sight for anyone who hasn't
    seen it. The comments are always positive. The wife of one of DH's
    friends tried to goad me into an argument over canning insisting it was
    a waste of time and you could buy it cheaper in the stores. My reply
    was my homecanned food tasted better. She went on and on so finally I
    handed her a jar of my salsa to take home and try. She ended up
    apologizing :) Seriously it sounds like your friend is just trying to
    wind you up which she has, in order to make herself feel better.
    >
    > Jo
     
  6. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    -L. wrote:

    > Henhouse wrote:
    >
    >>A friend of mine accused me of being a food snob the other day. Why?
    >>Because I don't buy processed food, and never go to fast food eateries.
    >>I also always buy free range chicken and use either eggs from our own
    >>free range chooks, or bought duck eggs. I also buy organic foods from
    >>time to time, and try to buy seasonally and locally (being aware of food
    >>miles etc.) Does this really make me a food snob?

    >
    >
    > By typical American standards, yes.
    >
    > I feel quite insulted,
    >
    > Don't. You are in good company. The way I see it, if people want to
    > feed themselves and their kids with that schlock, it's merely natural
    > selection at work...
    >
    > -L.
    >

    It seems to be working too! Childhood obesity is a grown concern, no
    pun intended. I can remember seeing only one or two obese kids during
    my grade school years and they were teased endlessly. Now there are one
    or two obese kids per classroom. Obesity in general has increased. All
    you have to do is take a walk in a mall to see this trend. Along with
    obesity comes all the negative health effects.
     
  7. Henhouse <[email protected]> hitched up their panties and posted
    news:p[email protected]:

    >
    > Anyway, I was wondering if anyone else here has suffered a similar
    > accusation, and had any good arguments with which to refute it? Or
    > perhaps you think my friend is right and I'm just too precious about the
    > whole topic? Opinions welcomed!
    >
    > Jo


    Speaking for myself only; I'll have to say no. I make it a point to help
    my friends feel welcome in my home. I have a friend that prides herself on
    making Hamburger Helper. Diane down the street is a gourmet cook. When we
    all get together here (about once every 2 months) we make what we want.
    It's terrific and we have a blast. Even Diane will eat the Hamburger
    Helper ;)

    When we entertain I'll make a decent meal. It's usually nothing real
    flashy. However I have learned one thing. Garnish to the hilt ;)

    Michael



    --
    "The most remarkable thing about my mother is that for thirty years she
    served the family nothing but leftovers. The original meal has never been
    found."

    --Calvin Trillin
     
  8. Ward Abbott

    Ward Abbott Guest

    On Sat, 18 Mar 2006 10:31:40 +0000, Henhouse
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >A friend of mine accused me of being a food snob the other day. Why?


    And I bet she is grossly overweight. Every time I go to the store
    and observe shoppers, the overweight people ALWAYS have their cart
    filled with processed, prepared food.

    Thin people have good food in their cart and most likely know how to
    peel a potato and make a mashed potato.

    To be honest though...I have started buying the "bagged" salad mix in
    the store. It really is fresh and a thin the mix with fresh iceberg
    lettuce to make it last longer.
     
  9. "kilikini" <[email protected]> hitched up their panties and
    posted news:[email protected]:
    >
    > I have a friend like that, too, and she's always inviting me to come
    > over for lunch. What does she have on hand on a regular basis?
    > Frozen burritos, Kraft mac 'n cheese, packaged ramen noodles, pizza
    > rolls, frozen jalepeno poppers, frozen breaded chicken tenders - stuff
    > like that. That's what she feeds her family. I politely decline, but
    > then I feel compelled to offer her something from *my* fridge, which
    > she always accepts because she knows what I prepare is made with fresh
    > ingredients and it still tastes good!


    You and Alan are great cooks. I've seen the pics ;) However, I'd never
    refuse to eat lunch with a friend. It wouldn't matter what they serve up.


    >
    > I keep shaking my head at my friend because she complains about her
    > weight and her daughters' weight (her 15 year old daughter is over 300
    > pounds!, her 12 year old is about 170) and I just want to shake her!
    > I keep trying to tell her that it's the kind of food she's buying
    > that's causing the weight gain, she nods and says "she knows", but she
    > claims that this is all her kids will eat. Personally, I think she's
    > killing her family. Sad thing is, all this junk "food" is supported
    > by the government. Yep, you got it, Food Stamps. Someone should
    > supervise what kinds of foods people should be allowed to buy on
    > government assistance.
    >
    > kili


    The weight is an issue. If ya' eat junk you put on the pounds. I don't
    know about the Food Stamps. Can people buy just anything with them?

    Michael

    --
    "The most remarkable thing about my mother is that for thirty years she
    served the family nothing but leftovers. The original meal has never been
    found."

    --Calvin Trillin
     
  10. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    kilikini wrote:

    > "Henhouse" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]
    >
    >>A friend of mine accused me of being a food snob the other day. Why?
    >>Because I don't buy processed food, and never go to fast food eateries.
    >>I also always buy free range chicken and use either eggs from our own
    >>free range chooks, or bought duck eggs. I also buy organic foods from
    >>time to time, and try to buy seasonally and locally (being aware of food
    >>miles etc.) Does this really make me a food snob? I feel quite insulted,
    >>to tell you the truth - I don't dictate what others should eat, I just
    >>make the choices I prefer. I enjoy cooking and have the time to spend
    >>doing it, plus access to great local produce - I'm not sure why this
    >>could be seen as wrong in some way!
    >>
    >>My friend got quite heated about it all, and told me that if I'd got
    >>four kids and was working full time, I'd soon change my ways and opt for
    >>foods I could just stick in the microwave (not that she has the four
    >>kids etc., just the one 25yr old son). I'm not likely to ever find
    >>myself in that position, but I imagine that if I had children I'd be
    >>even more concerned about the foods they were eating than I am about my
    >>own. I could be wrong, of course!
    >>
    >>This is the same friend who is happy to come to dinner at my house, but
    >>who refuses to return the favour, as she is 'frightened' of cooking for
    >>me, as I am (allegedly) good at it - LOL! I'd be happy with beans on
    >>toast, if someone else had cooked it - but that's by the by.
    >>
    >>Anyway, I was wondering if anyone else here has suffered a similar
    >>accusation, and had any good arguments with which to refute it? Or
    >>perhaps you think my friend is right and I'm just too precious about the
    >>whole topic? Opinions welcomed!
    >>
    >>Jo

    >
    >
    > I have a friend like that, too, and she's always inviting me to come over
    > for lunch. What does she have on hand on a regular basis? Frozen burritos,
    > Kraft mac 'n cheese, packaged ramen noodles, pizza rolls, frozen jalepeno
    > poppers, frozen breaded chicken tenders - stuff like that. That's what she
    > feeds her family. I politely decline, but then I feel compelled to offer
    > her something from *my* fridge, which she always accepts because she knows
    > what I prepare is made with fresh ingredients and it still tastes good!
    >
    > I keep shaking my head at my friend because she complains about her weight
    > and her daughters' weight (her 15 year old daughter is over 300 pounds!, her
    > 12 year old is about 170) and I just want to shake her! I keep trying to
    > tell her that it's the kind of food she's buying that's causing the weight
    > gain, she nods and says "she knows", but she claims that this is all her
    > kids will eat. Personally, I think she's killing her family. Sad thing is,
    > all this junk "food" is supported by the government. Yep, you got it, Food
    > Stamps. Someone should supervise what kinds of foods people should be
    > allowed to buy on government assistance.


    This is just my observation but quite often people resort to the junk
    food like you mentioned because they don't know how to cook and/or don't
    have the necessary cooking equipment. Another problem is a lot of this
    pre-prepared food tends to ultimately be more expensive that the
    comparable made from scratch. So to me, it would make sense to offer
    free classes to help them learn about nutritious and how to cook. OTOH,
    you can't help someone who doesn't want to be helped :(
    >
    > kili
    >
    >
     
  11. Roberta

    Roberta Guest

    Ward Abbott wrote:
    > On Sat, 18 Mar 2006 10:31:40 +0000, Henhouse
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> A friend of mine accused me of being a food snob the other day. Why?

    >
    > And I bet she is grossly overweight. Every time I go to the store
    > and observe shoppers, the overweight people ALWAYS have their cart
    > filled with processed, prepared food.
    >
    > Thin people have good food in their cart and most likely know how to
    > peel a potato and make a mashed potato.
    >
    > To be honest though...I have started buying the "bagged" salad mix in
    > the store. It really is fresh and a thin the mix with fresh iceberg
    > lettuce to make it last longer.
    >


    You know what's funny - that isn't always true.

    I cook - I love to cook. Almost every dinner I serve in this house is
    cooked from scratch every night. I could stand to loose about 10
    pounds. I have a friend that is as skinny as a rail. She cooks maybe
    once a week - something like Tacos from a kit. Other nights she feeds
    her kids mac n cheese or chicken nuggets etc. The only reason she is so
    skinny is she doesn't eat often. Maybe one meal a day. We went out to
    dinner with she and her husband, she had a dinner salad no dressing.
    She doesn't eat dairy and no sugar. I wouldn't call her healthier than
    me - nor would I call her kids healthier. I do buy some processed
    food...not a whole lot but some (ego waffles, canned pizza sauce, a few
    other things like that)

    The funniest thing about the whole situation - I allow my kids one
    "sweet treat" a day (unless they are being punished) Which means they
    can have a cookie, some pudding, maybe a piece of chocolate or even
    *gasp* a small glass of soda with dinner....She thinks that is horrible.
    Because of course, grilled chicken - rice - steamed broccolis and a 6
    oz glass of Sprite is worse for you than chicken nuggets...


    Sorry - got off on my own rant there :)

    Roberta (in VA)
     
  12. Roberta <[email protected]> hitched up their panties and posted
    news:[email protected]:

    > Ward Abbott wrote:
    >> On Sat, 18 Mar 2006 10:31:40 +0000, Henhouse
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> A friend of mine accused me of being a food snob the other day. Why?

    >>
    >> And I bet she is grossly overweight. Every time I go to the store
    >> and observe shoppers, the overweight people ALWAYS have their cart
    >> filled with processed, prepared food.
    >>
    >> Thin people have good food in their cart and most likely know how to
    >> peel a potato and make a mashed potato.
    >>
    >> To be honest though...I have started buying the "bagged" salad mix in
    >> the store. It really is fresh and a thin the mix with fresh iceberg
    >> lettuce to make it last longer.
    >>

    >
    > You know what's funny - that isn't always true.
    >
    > I cook - I love to cook. Almost every dinner I serve in this house is
    > cooked from scratch every night. I could stand to loose about 10
    > pounds. I have a friend that is as skinny as a rail. She cooks maybe
    > once a week - something like Tacos from a kit. Other nights she feeds
    > her kids mac n cheese or chicken nuggets etc. The only reason she is so
    > skinny is she doesn't eat often. Maybe one meal a day. We went out to
    > dinner with she and her husband, she had a dinner salad no dressing.
    > She doesn't eat dairy and no sugar. I wouldn't call her healthier than
    > me - nor would I call her kids healthier. I do buy some processed
    > food...not a whole lot but some (ego waffles, canned pizza sauce, a few
    > other things like that)
    >
    > The funniest thing about the whole situation - I allow my kids one
    > "sweet treat" a day (unless they are being punished) Which means they
    > can have a cookie, some pudding, maybe a piece of chocolate or even
    > *gasp* a small glass of soda with dinner....She thinks that is horrible.
    > Because of course, grilled chicken - rice - steamed broccolis and a 6
    > oz glass of Sprite is worse for you than chicken nuggets...
    >
    >
    > Sorry - got off on my own rant there :)
    >
    > Roberta (in VA)
    >


    LOL... You eat like we do. For the most part it's fresh made on a daily
    basis. I *DO* like junk food now and then so I'll indulge in Kraft Mac 'N
    Cheese, Velveeta on crackers etc. I eat a lot of fish and seafood. I like
    fresh broccoli and/or spinach with it. Tilapia is my fave fish these days.
    Swordfish used to be my fave until it got to be $17 a pound.

    Michael

    --
    "The most remarkable thing about my mother is that for thirty years she
    served the family nothing but leftovers. The original meal has never been
    found."

    --Calvin Trillin
     
  13. Ward Abbott

    Ward Abbott Guest

    On Sat, 18 Mar 2006 07:49:38 -0500, Roberta <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >You know what's funny - that isn't always true.


    You know what's funny - there is an exception to every rule. <vbg>
     
  14. Ward Abbott <[email protected]> hitched up their panties and posted
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Sat, 18 Mar 2006 07:49:38 -0500, Roberta <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>You know what's funny - that isn't always true.

    >
    > You know what's funny - there is an exception to every rule. <vbg>


    You know what's funnier - The rules always change. <G>

    --
    "The most remarkable thing about my mother is that for thirty years she
    served the family nothing but leftovers. The original meal has never been
    found."

    --Calvin Trillin
     
  15. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Henhouse" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    >A friend of mine accused me of being a food snob the other day. Why?
    >Because I don't buy processed food, and never go to fast food eateries. I
    >also always buy free range chicken and use either eggs from our own free
    >range chooks, or bought duck eggs. I also buy organic foods from time to
    >time, and try to buy seasonally and locally (being aware of food miles
    >etc.) Does this really make me a food snob? I feel quite insulted, to tell
    >you the truth - I don't dictate what others should eat, I just make the
    >choices I prefer. I enjoy cooking and have the time to spend doing it, plus
    >access to great local produce - I'm not sure why this could be seen as
    >wrong in some way!
    >
    > My friend got quite heated about it all, and told me that if I'd got four
    > kids and was working full time, I'd soon change my ways and opt for foods
    > I could just stick in the microwave (not that she has the four kids etc.,
    > just the one 25yr old son). I'm not likely to ever find myself in that
    > position, but I imagine that if I had children I'd be even more concerned
    > about the foods they were eating than I am about my own. I could be wrong,
    > of course!
    >
    > This is the same friend who is happy to come to dinner at my house, but
    > who refuses to return the favour, as she is 'frightened' of cooking for
    > me, as I am (allegedly) good at it - LOL! I'd be happy with beans on
    > toast, if someone else had cooked it - but that's by the by.
    >
    > Anyway, I was wondering if anyone else here has suffered a similar
    > accusation, and had any good arguments with which to refute it? Or perhaps
    > you think my friend is right and I'm just too precious about the whole
    > topic? Opinions welcomed!
    >
    > Jo


    I have found thru experience there have usually been deep reasons for
    friends disapproving of my life style. I've had many people who will - to
    my face - say derisive things. I would have rather them said them behind my
    back and just leave me alone with their opinions. If you have tender
    feelings, then you will always be upset by people who disapprove of what you
    think and do. Some people are born with tender feelings. If you are, be
    happy with that and judge your friends accordingly.
    Dee Dee
     
  16. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    > The funniest thing about the whole situation - I allow my kids one "sweet
    > treat" a day (unless they are being punished) Which means they can have a
    > cookie, some pudding, maybe a piece of chocolate or even *gasp* a small
    > glass of soda with dinner....She thinks that is horrible. Because of
    > course, grilled chicken - rice - steamed broccolis and a 6 oz glass of
    > Sprite is worse for you than chicken nuggets...
    >
    >
    > Sorry - got off on my own rant there :)
    >
    > Roberta (in VA)


    I love rants!
    Dee Dee
     
  17. Roberta

    Roberta Guest

    Ward Abbott wrote:
    > On Sat, 18 Mar 2006 07:49:38 -0500, Roberta <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> You know what's funny - that isn't always true.

    >
    > You know what's funny - there is an exception to every rule. <vbg>
    >
    >


    Well yeah :) lol...I just needed to find somewhere to rant about it!

    Roberta (in VA)
     
  18. Roberta

    Roberta Guest

    Michael "Dog3" Lonergan wrote:
    > Ward Abbott <[email protected]> hitched up their panties and posted
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> On Sat, 18 Mar 2006 07:49:38 -0500, Roberta <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> You know what's funny - that isn't always true.

    >> You know what's funny - there is an exception to every rule. <vbg>

    >
    > You know what's funnier - The rules always change. <G>
    >


    Right about the time I learn 'em

    Roberta (in VA)
     
  19. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Dee Randall wrote:

    > I have found thru experience there have usually been deep reasons for
    > friends disapproving of my life style. I've had many people who will - to
    > my face - say derisive things. I would have rather them said them behind my
    > back and just leave me alone with their opinions. If you have tender
    > feelings, then you will always be upset by people who disapprove of what you
    > think and do. Some people are born with tender feelings. If you are, be
    > happy with that and judge your friends accordingly.


    I have a nephew who I really like despite his quirks. I am sure that he will do
    well in life despite his lack of education because he is street smarts and
    talented. He is estranged from his mother because she gets on his case all the
    time. He keeps his address and telephone number secret. He was on vacation with
    us last summer and during the course of a conversation said that he is very
    sensitive and doesn't take criticism well. Within a few minutes he said
    something I took offence to but then said he was just joking... pulling my
    chain. I told him that I was sensitive too, and that he should consider that
    when he thinks he should pull may chain.
     
  20. Ward Abbott

    Ward Abbott Guest

    On Sat, 18 Mar 2006 13:15:20 GMT, "Michael \"Dog3\" Lonergan"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >You know what's funnier - The rules always change. <G>


    ....and a rule to every exception. Get your name on the deed and you
    get to make the rules. ..no exceptions.
     
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