Food Vs. Fridge

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by [email protected], Jan 5, 2005.

  1. Is it safe to put food in the fridge shortly after cooking?

    My wife insists that just cooked food must be left on the counter to
    cool down before it is put in the fridge, otherwise it is prone to
    spoil. She says this is a well known fact amongst all fine people who
    cook. In fact, she claims, "any culinary school will tell you this,
    it's common fact and just plain common sense."

    Personally, this completely contradicts what I consider to be common
    sense. Heck - I was just trying to make room on the counter!

    This topic has come up a few times now and I'm hoping to get someone to
    back me up, or set me straight.

    -Colman
     
    Tags:


  2. tnguy

    tnguy Guest

    Colman
    As an old Navy cook I suggest you follow your lady's advice. If you
    place hot food in the fridge you lower the temp. You may not see of
    smell any probs immediately but, if you continue you run the risk of
    allowing bacteria to grow on other food. Let the new food cool to just
    warm, wrap in plastic (airtight as possible) and stow above cooler
    food. (as per the U.S. Navy Operation Manual) LOL

    Tnguy
     
  3. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Is it safe to put food in the fridge shortly after cooking?
    >
    > My wife insists that just cooked food must be left on the counter to
    > cool down before it is put in the fridge, otherwise it is prone to
    > spoil. She says this is a well known fact amongst all fine people who
    > cook. In fact, she claims, "any culinary school will tell you this,
    > it's common fact and just plain common sense."
    >
    > Personally, this completely contradicts what I consider to be common
    > sense. Heck - I was just trying to make room on the counter!
    >
    > This topic has come up a few times now and I'm hoping to get someone to
    > back me up, or set me straight.
    >
    > -Colman


    There are several variables.

    It important to remember refrigerators don't cool food they remove the heat
    from the interior. Yes there is a difference.

    The variables are:

    The size of the interior of the fridge.
    The mass of the food now in the fridge and its temperature.
    The mass of the cooked food and its temperature.

    Is it possible to raise the temperature of the food inside the fridge? Sure
    it could happen if you were to overload the fridge with a massive amount of
    food at a high temperature IMHO its not very likely.

    If you are dealing with the old "Icea Boxa" that used a 50 pound block of
    ice

    The risk here is leaving the food out too long and allowing the temperature
    to get into the danger range where bacteria grows. the FDA defines that zone
    as being from 40 to 140 degrees.

    Look here:
    http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets/Safe_Food_Handling_Fact_Sheets/index.asp

    Dimitri
     
  4. skoonj

    skoonj Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Is it safe to put food in the fridge shortly after cooking?
    >
    > My wife insists that just cooked food must be left on the counter to
    > cool down before it is put in the fridge, otherwise it is prone to
    > spoil. She says this is a well known fact amongst all fine people who
    > cook. In fact, she claims, "any culinary school will tell you this,
    > it's common fact and just plain common sense."
    >
    > Personally, this completely contradicts what I consider to be common
    > sense. Heck - I was just trying to make room on the counter!
    >
    > This topic has come up a few times now and I'm hoping to get someone to
    > back me up, or set me straight.
    >
    > -Colman


    I think your wife is mostly wrong. I wouldn't leave a roast out until it
    reaches room tempertaure.

    If it's a soup, stock or maybe stew, you can expedite the cool-down by
    filling a ziplock bag with ice cubes and submerging it. Then, put it in the
    refigerator. It won't be so warm as to overwhelm the fridge. I think this is
    Alton Brown's suggestion for when he makes lots of stock.

    -T
     
  5. In rec.food.cooking, [email protected] wrote:
    > Is it safe to put food in the fridge shortly after cooking?


    No. If you do this, you will surely die.

    --
    In the councils of government, we must guard against the
    acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought,
    by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the
    disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist.
    -- Dwight David Eisenhower
     
  6. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "skoonj" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Is it safe to put food in the fridge shortly after cooking?
    >>
    >> My wife insists that just cooked food must be left on the counter to
    >> cool down before it is put in the fridge, otherwise it is prone to
    >> spoil. She says this is a well known fact amongst all fine people who
    >> cook. In fact, she claims, "any culinary school will tell you this,
    >> it's common fact and just plain common sense."
    >>
    >> Personally, this completely contradicts what I consider to be common
    >> sense. Heck - I was just trying to make room on the counter!
    >>
    >> This topic has come up a few times now and I'm hoping to get someone to
    >> back me up, or set me straight.
    >>
    >> -Colman

    >
    > I think your wife is mostly wrong. I wouldn't leave a roast out until it
    > reaches room tempertaure.
    >
    > If it's a soup, stock or maybe stew, you can expedite the cool-down by
    > filling a ziplock bag with ice cubes and submerging it. Then, put it in
    > the refigerator. It won't be so warm as to overwhelm the fridge. I think
    > this is Alton Brown's suggestion for when he makes lots of stock.
    >
    > -T
    >


    Placing food in the fridge right after cooking is perfectly safe but wastes
    energy (the fridge has to work hard to cool it down) and may adversely
    affect other food in the fridge. Leaving it on the counter to cool is also
    perfectly safe, despite the hand-waving hysterics of some who are convinced
    it is a one-way ticket to the boneyard.


    --
    Peter Aitken

    Remove the crap from my email address before using.
     
  7. "Peter Aitken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > Placing food in the fridge right after cooking is perfectly safe but
    > wastes energy (the fridge has to work hard to cool it down) and may
    > adversely affect other food in the fridge. Leaving it on the counter to
    > cool is also perfectly safe, despite the hand-waving hysterics of some who
    > are convinced it is a one-way ticket to the boneyard.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Peter Aitken


    You have to use a little common sense. I'd not put a boiling pot of soup in
    the fridge, but I'd not leave a casserole sit out for five hours either.

    As a kid, I remember the leftover pork chop from dinner was often sat on the
    stove in case someone wanted it later. Sometimes it would sit a few hours.
    No one ever got sick from it.
     
  8. Thank you all for your responses! :)

    Our fridge is a standard size - i guess "medium" - residential kitchen
    fridge. I understand that putting, say ... a large pot of boiling
    water in there would bring the overall temperature of the fridge down
    considerably for a short period of time, thus giving bacteria in the
    other fridge items a chance to grow. This kind of event (squabbling
    over whether or not I can put something warm in the fridge) has only
    happened a handful of times during our six year marriage. So it's not
    like the fridge is constantly undergoing massive temperature shifts.

    I guess the heart of the matter is that my wife is standing by a "rule"
    she learned somewhere without understanding the cumulative knowledge
    that led to that conclusion. Interestingly, if this was a constant
    occurrance, then yes, food might spoil, but NOT the the most recent
    food causing the temperature decrease (which is the food she claims
    will spoil), but instead some food that had been in the fridge long
    enough to experience multiple temperature shifts.

    So in such extreme circumstances my wife is correct. But as I said,
    this event happens RARELY. So ... it's a draw as far as I'm concerned.
    I'll show my wife your posts and we'll see what she says! ;)
    Thank you all!

    -Colman
     
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