foot ache

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by catch, Aug 2, 2004.

  1. catch

    catch New Member

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    I am gradually increasing my flexibility, getting into the drops more and finding myself able to turn bigger gears for longer periods of time - but i find the limiting factor is an aching that gradually builds in the sole of my feet - particularly the arches. Is this a common problem - if so is there a common solution?
     
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  2. mtulen

    mtulen New Member

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    Hi,

    My guess is you may be developing a heelspur ( http://heelspurs.com/index.html ). It's fairly common as a runners injury, which is where I got it from about a year ago (and from being a little overweight). Picking up cycling actually helps me to reduce this pain, though only while turning lighter gears w. high cadence.

    Take it seriously and go see a docter. If it is a heelspur, training as hard as you do will only make it worse, and it will take a looooong time to heal.
     
  3. Carrera

    Carrera New Member

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    I have felt pain in this area before. I'm also prone to cramp in the foot which seems to become a major problem if I consume bananas prior to a ride.
    I'm aware the suggestion I'm going to make could be criticized but it may help.
    I actually ride my roadbike without toe-clips or straps although this is something that happened by accident. What happened was a bike mechanic falsely claimed I could fit straps to the new pedals I purchased - but this turned out not to be true. I never got round to re-fitting strap pedals even though a specialist shop told me I should do so. The theory is that with straps or clips you can pull up on a stroke as well as down.
    However, there are advantages in not using straps. I'm certain I would have been knocked off my bike by now had I been using straps at given moments. Once a car went right into me and I was able to bang my foot out instantly and break a fall. Otherwise my bike would have been damaged.
    In your case, using no straps for a time will allow you to alter your foot position and take stress off the arch. This could be a temporary measure you could try and see if it helps.
    I still climb at 14 mph without straps so any disadvantage isn't really that acute. At some time I guess I'll refit straps but I don't worry about it and have found I don't get arch pain if I shift my feet about. Try paddling your feet with sponge as well if the pain is acute and see a physio.




     
  4. danch

    danch New Member

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    Plantar Fasciitus. Common solution is to rest for a loooong time (as mtulen pointed out). Oddly enough, some runners find that cycling doesn't bother them and turn to it to avoid losing their cardio fitness. Others are warned away from cycling with this problem.

    I'm dealing with the same issue right now in my right foot. One question - are you dropping your heels a lot when you push the bigger gears? From what I've read, that and a lack of flexibility in your calves (gastro complex) could be triggering the issue. Stretch those calves and spin more, rather than mashing big gears to avoid making it worse, but if it is plantar fasciitus, you may need to completely rest it.

    Arch supports may help - for runners there's a variety of orthotic inserts that support the arch and hold the heel to prevent over-pronation. I'm trying the Specialized BodyGeometry shoes right now, which have a built in varus wedge to keep oddly shaped feet from twisting on the pedal. Normally this (forefoot varus, a twist in the toes) causes knee problems, though, not arch.

    Personally, I'm avoiding doctors for now because I don't want to be told to stop cycling ;)
     
  5. swerwer

    swerwer New Member

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    This is propably no help to you, but i've had similar "problem" since young. I get huge cramps in the bridge of my foot. especially after a long hard ride at night in bed. I have very flexible feet and tend to wiggle them a lot. It has gotten to such a stage that i can at certain times move my foot in a certain way, and that would instantly provoke the cramping. Have learnt how to control it through foot movement etc. Sometimes it is actually quite fun to play with it. I don't get any other cramping and do not get it while cycling. If i lay off cycling for a long time it goes away though. then again if it's not bleeding it doesn't hurt. Good luck in finding a solution. Otherwise just live with it. :rolleyes:
     
  6. chisa1234

    chisa1234 New Member

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    i have suffered - and still do - with various pains and aches in my feet.

    from numb toes, to pains on the outside of me feet i've had most things.

    road cycling shoes can be a problem. the stiffness of the soles and the lack of cushioning causes the outside edges of my feet ache really bad sometimes. i have gotten off for a few minutes and rubbed them till i felt better.

    also they tend to be a rather tight fit to keep your feet in the right position - this makes my little toes go numb.

    after trying almost everything i have resolved just to put up with it!

    on thing i do recommend is to always wear socks as i once read of a rider whose big toe nails fell off due to the lack of cushioning between shoe and toe.

    also it may be worth trying to change the position of the cleats to put stress on different parts of the foot which may be more tollerant.
     
  7. catch

    catch New Member

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    Thanks I think that peseverance is the answer
     
  8. 04moto

    04moto New Member

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    Sounds exactly like Plantar Fasciitus. Here's how you cure that:

    1. Ice after you ride.
    2. You MUST wrap the foot somewhat tight whereby you put tape across the arch (from the bottom) and pull upward (on the inside of the foot) supporting the arch and taping across the top of the foot to hold the arch up. You must do this EVERY NIGHT before you go to bed. Shower in the morning (careful not to re-injure on first steps). Take tape off after HOT shower to loosen muscles.
    3. Once the pain has subsided. Go to a heat then ice each night for about an hour (20 minutes ice, 20 minutes rest, 20 minutes heat).

    Go to a doctor who an apply Ultra-Sound therapy, it will heal almost over night.

    I've had Plantar Fasciitus twice and both times my Chiropractor helped me ger rid of it in 1 week. Ultra-Sound is KEY!

    Good luck!

    BTW: If its a bone spur you might have to work through it or have it removed.
     
  9. danch

    danch New Member

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    Thanks for the advice! I'll have to be more diligent with the icing to get this thing to heal - This particular outbreak is pretty minor, so I've just been walking slower (I'm not a 'stroll' kinda guy) and avoiding hills. The taping is good information too, and getting rid of it in a week with ultrasound is freaking stellar!

    Did you get yours on the bike? From what I've seen, that's very rare.
     
  10. grampy bone

    grampy bone New Member

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    I have the same problem over long rides. I first got plantar faciitis from playing tennis and actually ruptured my plantar tendon (2 years ago). I was in an walking cast for 2 months which held my foot in place and allowed the tendon (or ligament?) to re-attach itself. I did 35 miles today through hilly terrain and afterward had the pain again in my arch. This is a very common problem, moreso for long distance runners. I'm a bit worried about it because I don't want a rupture again. There is a very good website on the problem, www.heelspurs.com which gives some good taping advise. Good luck.:eek:
     
  11. closesupport

    closesupport Banned

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    is it deffinately in the bottom of your foot, foot ganglion (synovial hernia\synovial cyst)(A small,usually hard nodule lying directly over a tendon or a joint capsule on the top or the bottom of the foot. Occassionally the nodule becomes quite large, sometimes a foot ganglion will regress and disapear only to reapear again at some other time.

    Body parts involved

    1) top or sole of the foot
    2) tendon sheaths
    3) any or many joint spaces in the foot

    signs ands symptoms

    1) hard lump that yields to presure because it is not solid.
    2) no pain usually, but overuse of the foot may cause mild pain discomfort and aching
    3) tenderness if the lump is pressed hard
    4) discomfort with extremes of motion (flexing or extending) and with repetition of the exercise that caused the injury.

    surgery is usually required, diagnosed by your sysmptom but require a further xray, healing process usually takes about 3 wks. if this is what you have see your doctor to be on the safe side.

    does that sound like you................
     
  12. danch

    danch New Member

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    No. No lump, and it was diagnosed as plantar fasciitus by a physician (albeit in an earlier episode). Not that docs can't be wrong, but in this case there's no evidence to contradict the original diagnosis.

    As to how my right foot is doing - the taping and RICE after hard rides (and wearing my very supportive running shoes as daily wear) has helped tremendously. It gets a bit achy in long or hard rights, but there's no huge problem. This episode has been rather minor, as opposed to the earlier one where I saw the doc - that time I spent a couple days unable to walk, this time I never even had a limp.

    Thanks again for everyone's help and input in this, and I'm hoping that the original poster is also having good luck in healing.
     
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