Foot flexion or extension w/ cycling?

Discussion in 'Health Nutrition and Supplements' started by swreed, Jul 20, 2016.

  1. swreed

    swreed New Member

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    Hi all, I'm normally a runner but have been having anterior tib pain with foot flexion/extension. I was wondering if cycling on a stationary bike keeps the foot neutral or if it would aggravate my injury. I have no pain when standing with my foot in neutral position. I haven't been able to run for 2 weeks and would like some exercise.

    Thanks
     


  2. sbayhylle

    sbayhylle New Member

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    My advice is to try the stationary bike. If that doesn't work and you have access to a rowing machine hop on the rower and try that.
     
  3. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    There's more than one way to pedal.
    If you want to keep your foot basically perpendicular to your lower leg for the whole duration of the rotation, go ahead.
    It's probably most common to do a little bit of ankling though, get some heel lift when the foot is going up.
    Personally, I tend to get a fair amount of heel lift when riding out of saddle.
     
  4. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Ummm ...

    Regardless of whichever pedaling technique you might employ while "cycling" ...

    Unless you have sustained a hairline stress fracture then what you are describing simply sounds like SHIN SPLINTS which can occur from over use but more often occur with a novice runner or someone who has changed his-or-her running style ...

    Shin splints are annoying, but otherwise harmless in 99.99% of the instances ...

    Because (by recollection) a shin splint is simply an adhesion of the tibialus anterior to the tibia due to a lack of lubricity in the muscle's sheath which is a consequence of prior 'inactivity' of that muscle/-group ...
    IMO, unless you are over 95, then I would suggest that you NEED the motion rather than lack of motion ...

    Consequently, EITHER employing low impact motion over a period of several days/weeks until lubricity is increased & the adhesion no longer occurs will probably eliminate the pain OR going-for-the-gold and simply running for two weeks should also eliminate the discomfort if there isn't a skeletal problem.
    Of course, OTHERS may disagree with my assessment & remedy and suggest the lack of motion which you feel is the correct remedy.






     
  5. DonS

    DonS New Member

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    I you still have shin splints, I use an easy, simple exercise to get over them. Sit on the floor with your back against the wall, and your legs stretched out in front of you. If you are doing the right shin, take your left leg and lift it over on top of the right leg and put your left foot down on top of your right foot. Your left foot will be pointing up and to the left at about 45 degree angle, and the edge of your left foot will be resting on top of your right foot where your toes join the foot. With your left foot, try to press your toes away from you, while resisting with your right foot you as you try to point them back toward you. It ends up being like an isometric exercise. Hold that for 10-20 seconds and do it 2-3 times per shin--you will feel the muscle on the front of your leg flex. Do this 2-3 times per day. For me, they are gone in a few days.
     
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