Footballer cycling accident

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Squeaker, Jul 22, 2004.

  1. Squeaker

    Squeaker New Member

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  2. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 22/7/04 11:25 am, in article
    [email protected], "Squeaker"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > Sorry to hear this guy had an accident, but even sorrier the whole
    > team's been banned from cycling. I do find that when people first
    > discover I cycle on the roads they assume it's far more dangerous than
    > it really is.
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/6u3wp


    Especially in the light of the number of footballers who have been killed
    whilst driving. Should they be banned from driving as well?

    ...d
     
  3. "David Martin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:BD255908.1B04F%[email protected]

    > Especially in the light of the number of footballers who have been killed
    > whilst driving. Should they be banned from driving as well?


    At a guess I would put walking as more dangerous than cycling (it certainly *felt*
    more dangerous when I had to walk to work recently), so the team should be banned
    from walking!
     
  4. John Hearns

    John Hearns Guest

    On Thu, 22 Jul 2004 13:05:27 +0100, Adrian Boliston wrote:

    >
    > At a guess I would put walking as more dangerous than cycling (it certainly *felt*
    > more dangerous when I had to walk to work recently), so the team should be banned
    > from walking!


    Does anyone have the source for the plot in section 11.1
    and the figures?
    It renders so badly as to be unreadable.
    http://www.dft.gov.uk/strategy/futureoftransport/chapter11/challenge.htm
     
  5. >> Especially in the light of the number of footballers who have been
    >> killed whilst driving. Should they be banned from driving as well?

    >
    > At a guess I would put walking as more dangerous than cycling (it
    > certainly *felt* more dangerous when I had to walk to work recently),
    > so the team should be banned from walking!


    I reckon playing football gives 'em the most injuries, so I'd ban 'em from
    that as well. They seem to pick up loads of niggling injuries in training
    to so I'd discourage that too. Of all sportsmen only rugby players seem to
    have picked up on this, I presume this is why they spend an inordinate
    amount of time in the pub.
     
  6. David Hansen

    David Hansen Guest

    On Thu, 22 Jul 2004 11:44:08 +0100 someone who may be David Martin
    <[email protected]> wrote this:-

    >Especially in the light of the number of footballers who have been killed
    >whilst driving. Should they be banned from driving as well?


    Heading the ball is also dangerous, though less so than it was in
    the days of heavy waterlogged leather balls.


    --
    David Hansen, Edinburgh | PGP email preferred-key number F566DA0E
    I will always explain revoked keys, unless the UK government
    prevents me using the RIP Act 2000.
     
  7. On Thu, 22 Jul 2004 14:37:25 +0100, in
    <[email protected]>, David Hansen
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Thu, 22 Jul 2004 11:44:08 +0100 someone who may be David Martin
    ><[email protected]> wrote this:-
    >
    >>Especially in the light of the number of footballers who have been killed
    >>whilst driving. Should they be banned from driving as well?

    >
    >Heading the ball is also dangerous, though less so than it was in
    >the days of heavy waterlogged leather balls.


    A very good case for Football Helmets.

    --
    I remember when the internet was only in black & white.
    It only had a few pages but at least they all worked.
     
  8. Squeaker

    Squeaker New Member

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  9. sean

    sean Guest

    Squeaker <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Sorry to hear this guy had an accident, but even sorrier the whole
    > team's been banned from cycling. I do find that when people first
    > discover I cycle on the roads they assume it's far more dangerous than
    > it really is.
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/6u3wp


    Kevin Keegan has first hand, arm, shoulder, thigh, dignity experience
    of cycling. I wonder if he shared an aside with Graeme Souness?

    Some managers used to protect their players by banning them from
    playing football against a team that had Graeme Souness in it?
    Sean.
     
  10. Sue

    Sue Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Richard Bates
    <[email protected]> writes
    >>
    >>Heading the ball is also dangerous, though less so than it was in
    >>the days of heavy waterlogged leather balls.

    >
    >A very good case for Football Helmets.
    >

    Helmets wouldn't prevent the brain damage that results from heading the
    ball, but of course that's no reason for not insisting they be worn.

    --
    Sue ];:))
     
  11. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    Richard Bates <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:eek:[email protected]:

    > A very good case for Football Helmets.


    I was told once that when they allowed the wearing of helmets in shinty (or
    was it hurling) then they banned wearers from heading the ball. The ball is
    fairly small and can be travelling at a fair old speed, the idea of heading
    it *without* a helmet seems a bit extreme.


    Graeme
     
  12. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    [email protected] (sean) wrote in news:dd8669f3.0407220710.675bfd74
    @posting.google.com:

    > Kevin Keegan has first hand, arm, shoulder, thigh, dignity experience
    > of cycling.


    I remember watching him on "Superstars" (early 80's Sunday evening
    entertainment on BBC1) where he stuffed up on the bike race. Whether it was
    that time or another he said he'd really enjoyed it and intended to spend a
    few hundred quid on a bike. I remember thinking at the time "Surely no bike
    costs that much!" I've since learnt the truth :)

    Graeme
     
  13. >Sorry to hear this guy had an accident, but even sorrier the whole
    >team's been banned from cycling. I do find that when people first
    >discover I cycle on the roads they assume it's far more dangerous than
    >it really is.


    Again, it's a shame the guy had an accident. Comforting, in s strange way,
    though to realise my fifteen-year-old has a better understanding of the
    realities of the risk involved in cycling than a football manager who has
    stopped his team from cycling...

    I wonder if said football manager will be stopping his team from driving...
    walking...

    Cheers, helen s


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  14. >Do you now let your son make his own decisions on wearing a helmet?

    I do, and he does (wear one).

    Cheers, helen s


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  15. JohnB

    JohnB Guest

    dirtylitterboxofferingstospammers wrote:
    >
    >
    > Again, it's a shame the guy had an accident. Comforting, in s strange way,
    > though to realise my fifteen-year-old has a better understanding of the
    > realities of the risk involved in cycling than a football manager who has
    > stopped his team from cycling...


    Do you now let your son make his own decisions on wearing a helmet?
    ISTR you used to insist he did (apologies if that is wrong).

    John B
     
  16. JohnB

    JohnB Guest

    dirtylitterboxofferingstospammers wrote:
    >
    > >Do you now let your son make his own decisions on wearing a helmet?

    >
    > I do, and he does (wear one).


    I'm glad that you would permit him to go out riding without one.

    It's always going to be a difficult decision for a parent [1], and one
    that I have to make every day as my children sometimes want to wear one
    but more often don't - and yes they are very up on the reasons why :)

    In the end I *much* prefer them to go out riding without, rather than
    them not ride at all.

    [1] especially one that veers towards seeing those who wear helmets to
    be making compulsion more likely.

    John B
     
  17. >I'm glad that you would permit him to go out riding without one.
    >


    I honestly couldn't give a fig what you or anyone else thinks of my parenting,
    John.

    Cheers, helen s




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  18. JohnB

    JohnB Guest

    dirtylitterboxofferingstospammers wrote:
    >
    > >I'm glad that you would permit him to go out riding without one.
    > >

    >
    > I honestly couldn't give a fig what you or anyone else thinks of my parenting,
    > John.


    Huh? I am very supportive of your stance.
    It is a serious subject that raises itself many times in discussion
    between parents of children who cycle.
    At what point does the parent step back and give responsibility to their offspring?

    I am pleased that parents do give their children the choice to go out
    without wearing helmets (as you do) because, as well as increasing
    cycling, it gives children of today greater independence, improved
    health, develops responsible behaviour and promotes cycling as a safe
    and enjoyable activity.

    John B
     
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